[PR] Gain and Get More Likes and Followers on Instagram.

xicanisma_ xicanisma_

860 posts   99296 followers   80 followings

  Dismantling oppressive isms through tears. 👩🏽‍💻 Avatar: `A Modest Proposal’ by Yto Barrada

http://patreon.com/xicanisma

I never get tired of admiring my friends Los Dos (@losdos_maintainstudio @maintainstudio) beautiful work. This one is `Sister Cities’ based on Juarez/El Paso. 💜💜 (I’m covering the words that say “JRZ”) 📷 by @eatthiscity.

“A national conversation about structurally enabled sexual violence in this country needs to address prisons and detention centers. According to a 2012 Justice Department report, an estimated 200,000-plus people are sexually abused in U.S. detention centers every year, with nearly half of all reported instances citing prison guards or staff as the alleged abuser (these are only the reported cases in a context of notoriously underreported incidents). Only about 10 percent of allegations were even followed by an investigation; only 1 percent of prison staff found to have engaged in sexual misconduct were subjected to criminal conviction._
_
This low number is especially disturbing given that under law, any and all sex between corrections officers and the incarcerated people they oversee is considered rape. But the letter of the law’s recognition of the coercive power dynamic between a prison guard and a prisoner has little relevance in a system in which that very power imbalance keeps victims silenced, ignored, and routinely disbelieved._
_
In a 2003 federal law was meant to put a stop to sexual assault in the nation’s prisons, jails and juvenile detention centers and more than $110 million in state and federal taxpayer money has been spent to help states tackle the problem. By last fall, every state was supposed to have dozens of new standards in place, ranging from increased training of staff about sex abuse policies to procedures meant to help inmates safely report attacks. “We need to remember that sexual violence has been part of the prison system since it started, but this has been unnoticed and unhighlighted,” Victoria Law, an Intercept contributor and author of “Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women,” told me. Survivors attempting to report predators in powerful positions can always expect negative consequences, Law explained, but in prisons the challenges are unique. “In these cases,” she said, referring to assaults by prison officials, “the person you’re trying to speak out against has the keys to your freedom.””_
_
https://theintercept.com/2017/11/21/prison-rape-sexual-assault-violence/

Trump Administration Says That Nearly 200,000 Salvadorans Must Leave_
_
“Nearly 200,000 people from El Salvador who have been allowed to live in the United States for more than a decade must leave the country, government officials announced Monday. It is the Trump administration’s latest reversal of years of immigration policies and one of the most consequential to date._
_
Homeland security officials said that they were ending a humanitarian program, known as Temporary Protected Status, for Salvadorans who have been allowed to live and work legally in the United States since a pair of devastating earthquakes struck their country in 2001._
_
Salvadorans were by far the largest group of foreigners benefiting from temporary protected status, which shielded them from deportation if they had arrived in the United States illegally. The decision came just weeks after more than 45,000 Haitians, the second largest group, lost protections granted after Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, and it suggested that others in the program, namely Hondurans, may soon lose them as well. Nicaraguans lost their protections last year._
_
Immigrant advocates and the El Salvadoran government had pleaded for the United States to extend the program, as it has several times since 2001, saying that conditions in El Salvador were still dire. A sense of dread gripped Salvadorans and their employers in California, Texas, Virginia and elsewhere.”_
_
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/01/08/us/salvadorans-tps-end.html?referer=http%3A%2F%2Fm.facebook.com

Reminder.

This is what we’re doing right now? 😒😒 Instead of accepting that someone is trash, we’re blaming Central Americans and accusing them of “racism” (can’t even be a thing, by the way) when we’re the ones spewing anti-Central American sentiments daily and refusing to check ourselves and our own privileges? It’s not even surprising honestly, Chicanxs love playing victim when confronted by other Latinxs on our xenophobic bullshit.

If y’all haven’t seen the whole clip of this guy showing his ignorant anti-Black ass, look it up. He tells her she needs to do “more Beyoncé and less Macy Gray,” calls her “Nutella Queen,” says you can’t be elegant with an afro, and then proceeds to gaslight her when she’s so finally fed up. These are the anti-Black comments and interactions Black/Afro-Latinxs are subjected to all the time by non-Black Latinxs. It’s 2018 why are people still “confused” about how you can be Black and Latinx at the same damn time!? Let’s admit this guy sounds like someone we know irl. I hope we are able to call out our own family members and friends the same way everyone is calling out this guy online._
_
On a lighter note, I’m so happy to see Amara la Negra get the recognition and praise she deserves. 💜💜

“You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, who had ever been alive.” —James Baldwin_
_
A gentle reminder to myself, and everyone else, to read more this year. Feel free to comment with book recommendations below.

vía Libres y Salvajes on FB.

#StopErasingBlackWomensWork2018_
_
“Time Magazine unveiled their Person of the Year, of which, the #MeToo movement received the top honor. According to TIME, the #MeToo movement “unleashed one of the highest-velocity shifts in our culture since the 1960s.” They dubbed the people behind the movement “The Silence Breakers” and on the cover featured Ashley Judd, Susan Fowler, Adama Iwu, Taylor Swift and Isabel Pascual. It was one of the better days on the Internet as many women rejoiced, feeling that they’ve finally been seen and had their pain heard._
_
However, like hundreds of Black women on social media, I was incredibly disappointed to see that Tarana Burke — the founder of the #MeToo movement — was left off of the cover._
_
Let’s be clear, the outrage over Tarana’s absence on the cover isn’t about who gets credit for a hashtag — it’s about the marginalization of Black women in movements that we’ve started. We have long lived in a society that rushes to heap praise and credit on white women for the accomplishments of others (see also: Kim Kardashian’s “trendy boxer braids”), but since #MeToo is all about giving voice to the previously silenced, let’s do it right this time._
_
Many have pointed out that Tarana is in fact included in the accompanying article and she’s given her credit as the person who coined the phrase “Me Too” ten years ago. But she’s buried 2000 words deep — the literal definition of marginalization — and much of her section is dedicated to praising Alyssa Milano (who, upon reading it in black and white, clearly appropriated Tarana’s phrase and put it on social media) for lighting the match that sparked the movement.”_
_
https://www.bet.com/celebrities/news/2017/12/07/tarana-burke.html

It’s always interesting seeing fellow non-Black Latinxs “shocked” at reading about other non-Black Latinxs being anti-Black as fuck. We need to take a look at our history, culture, community, and acknowledge that they’re rooted in anti-Blackness. More importantly, we need to take a look at *ourselves* and examine the ways in which we perpetuate those sentiments. No, not all non-Black Latinxs are marching with KKK, but anti-Blackness also looks like erasing, dismissing, and denying Black/Afro-Latinx lives and experiences. We (non-Black Latinxs) benefit from anti-Blackness and therefore hold non-Black privilege. It’s no surprise so many non-Black Latinxs align themselves with white supremacy in the US of it means that we get to feel “American,” aka anti-Black. Let’s start 2018 by not only acknowledging these things, but continuing to work on checking ourselves, families, and community._
*_
*_
*_
“The presence of these Latino men at the largest white nationalist event in recent memory underscores the complicated racial position of Latinos in the United States. Latino white supremacy, it turns out, might not be a contradiction in terms._
_
Another Pew Research Center study from December found that 59% of U.S. adults with Latino heritage who identify as white believe others see them as white, too. Over time, the study found, descendants of Latino immigrants stop identifying with their countries of origin and consider themselves more and more American._
_
Ramos, however, rejects any notion that he’s racist, insisting he went to Charlottesville in defense of free speech and as a show of force against left-wing groups like Black Lives Matter and Antifa._
_
During the nearly hourlong video Ramos posted to Facebook, he became agitated at users who challenged him for marching with the KKK and jumping a black man._
_
“Yeah, I stood side-by-side with racist people, but they weren’t racist to me,” Ramos said. “They did not call me a ‘spic,’ they did not call me a ‘fucking wetback,’ they didn’t say nothing as such. We stood for the same common goal.””_
_
Find full article by searching title on google.

“8. Bitter Brown Femmes - Two Bitter Brown Femmes aim to dismantle -isms while running their mouths. Coming at you with critique and commentary of social justice, pop culture, and Latinx/Xicanx issues/cultura from a comedic lens.” —Full post at http://podcastsincolor.com
_
Thank you for including us in this list amongst so many other amazing podcasts, @podcastsincolor! Excited to continue putting out even better episodes in 2018! Thank you to everyone who has listened. And for those who haven’t, jump in! We are now on iTunes!_
_

SoundCloud:_
https://soundcloud.com/bitterbrownfemmes/have-yourself-a-merry-little-chisme-1
_
Audioboom:
https://audioboom.com/channels/4939795

A few months ago, strippers in NYC started striking in response to racism/colorism and wage theft in clubs. Strip clubs need to be owned and operated by sex workers themselves. Primarily by trans women and Black women/WoC (who get it). I hope we continue to show solidarity to all sex workers this year. Follow @nycstripperstrike for updates. You can also check our article link below for full story. ***Image vía @cummanifesto, another sex worker account to follow documenting sex work.
_
“Inseparable from the difficulties with bartenders is the issue of colorism. Among dancers, there is near-universal agreement that dark-skinned women cannot get hired as bartenders, and often miss out on other opportunities as well (Panama, for her part, has plenty of stories of dark-skinned women not allowed to work in VIP areas, and of being told not to bother showing up to work on specific nights). For Sinnamon, this is another chapter in a long story of discrimination in the sex industry—a story that is written by the (mostly) men who own film studios, strip clubs, and the like,who are forcing their idea of attractiveness onto their clients. She tackled colorism in sex work in an essay found in the 2013 anthology The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure._
_
“In the early to mid-'90s, video vixens pretty much had to pass a paper bag test,” she remembers. “You would see all of the women had a very similar look to them; they were all fairly fair-skinned, curly hair, very petite, yet curvy figures. The image of women of color in porn is very built around these white, male company owner fantasies of what makes black or Latin or Asian women attractive. Much of that is because of their consumer base—at that time, at least—was primarily white men. They're producing and distributing porn for white male consumption, because that's their consumer base._
_
http://www.complex.com/life/2017/11/the-story-behind-nyc-stripper-strike

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags