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Woodland Trust  We want to see a UK rich in native woods and trees, for people and wildlife. #WoodlandTrust 🌳

Today marks the start of the @BTObirds #NationalNestBoxWeek! Pop up a nest box for your garden friends and give them a helping hand this spring. Natural nest sites for birds such as holes in trees or old buildings are disappearing fast, so nest boxes create a safe place for them.

Taking part in NNBW gives you the chance to contribute to bird conservation whilst giving you the pleasure of observing any breeding birds that you attract to your nest box. Will you be putting one up this weekend? If you do share it with us using #WoodlandTrust!🐦

All you need is love...a hug is all you need! Happy #ValentinesDay everyone, trees need love too. What better way to show your appreciation for trees by giving them a big hug today. Let us know why you love trees below and #ShowTheLove💚 🌳

A wonderful ancient sweet chestnut tree found in Betchworth Park, Surrey. Did you most of our remaining ancients are found in parks and historic royal hunting grounds rather than ancient woodland?

Few trees in woodland settings actually reach ancient status. While they are young and vigorous they can compete with their neighbours, but once they decline with old age, their canopy retrenches and the younger trees around them will outcompete them to reach the space in the canopy. As they are shaded out the older trees die off relatively quickly.

In open settings, such as wood pasture and parkland, trees do not have to compete excessively with each other for space, light, water or nutrients. Their root systems can expand much further, as can their crowns. Open-grown trees generally have short, squat, fat trunks with large diameters and spreading limbs, some of which can be almost horizontal! Now you can impress your friends with this knowledge when you spot one!🌳 (Photo by Jim Smith-Wright)

Our trees can help us tackle #ClimateChange. They store carbon, mitigate flooding and provide renewable alternatives to fossil fuels. Together we can combat climate change, fight for our trees and #ShowTheLove this February 🌳💚 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Follow the link in our bio to find out how you can get involved and send green hearts soaring. @theclimatecoalition have some great resources on their website too!

#BenShieldaig is an entire ecosystem in one of the best known upland landscapes in the UK. Did you know it's also home to the UK's smallest dragonfly, the black darter?

We've been given the incredibly rare opportunity to purchase our very first mountain and begin the process of planting, protecting and regenerating this Site of Special Scientific Interest. We want Ben Shieldaig to thrive and let wildlife flourish. Will you help? You can support our appeal at woodlandtrust.org.uk/mountain (link in bio too) .
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#WoodlandTrust#Shieldaig#BlackDarterDragonfly#AncientWoodland#ScottishHighlands

Our climate is changing, and we need your help to track its effects on the natural world. Recorders Valerie and Greg talk about why they track the seasons on #NaturesCalendar 🐝Swipe across for full video 👉

This rewarding hobby makes a real difference to our records. You can take part wherever you are in the UK and help us monitor the effects of #ClimateChange on our flora and fauna.

Register online and record with Nature's Calendar today naturescalendar.woodlandtrust.org.uk (link in bio too)

Gribbet!🐸 One of the first signs of spring is the spawning of frogs and toads. Look for masses of jelly-like frog spawn in local ponds and ditches. There's evidence that frogs and toads are breeding earlier, so start looking in February. Let us know when you spot your first frogspawn on Nature's Calendar (link in bio or go to naturescalendar.woodlandtrust.org.uk)
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#WoodlandTrust#NaturesCalendar#Frogs#Frogspawn#BritishWildlife

Birch trees are among the first trees to come into leaf each year. They were consecrated to the god Thor in Scandinavian mythology, and were seen as a symbol of spring. Anglo Saxons also regarded birch as a symbol of renewal and purification. In fact their goddess of spring, Eostre, was celebrated around and through the birch tree between the spring equinox and Beltane. (Photo by Marcus Obal)
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#WoodlandTrust#SilverBirch#BetulaPendula#FolkloreThursday#Folklore

This week's most recorded Nature's Calendar species is the blackcap. The blackcap's rich and varied song has earned it the name of ‘northern nightingale’. Males and females are grey-brown in colour, but males have a distinct black cap on their head. Females have a red-brown one.

Have you spotted any throughout winter? When did you spot your first one? You can add your record here naturescalendar.woodlandtrust.org.uk (link in bio too😊) There's some suggestion that more of these summer visitors are overwintering in the UK. Warmer winters caused by climate change and an increase in the number of people feeding birds are thought to have driven this change. Your records are so important as they help us monitor this. (Photo by Hedera Baltica via Flickr)
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#WoodlandTrust#NaturesCalendar#Blackcap#Sylviaatricapilla#BirdWatching#BritishWildlife

Did you know know nettles are very nutritious? They contain high levels of vitamin A and D and are packed with minerals too! They’re one of the first early spring greens to emerge with new growth usually appearing in early February. The young leaves should be picked between late February and early June - the tips are the most tender and give the best flavour!

Gather only the youngest leaves from the top of each plant and make sure to wash well and remove tougher stems before cooking.

It’s an unmistakable plant and grows pretty much everywhere. Just remember to avoid roadside and pesticide-ridden areas. You can use nettle in the same way as spinach or to make tea, beer or soup (try creamy nettle and potato).
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#WoodlandTrust#Nettles#StingingNettles#Foraging#WildFood#SignsOfSpring

How beautiful does our Loch Arkaig site look on a clear winter's day? Loch Arkaig Pine Forest is one of the UK’s most significant remaining fragments of native Caledonian pinewood. It lies within an iconic landscape of sparkling lochs fringed by mountains and heather-covered moors. With its rare wildlife and flora, this vast forest is a hugely exciting recent purchase for us. We're working closely with the local community to restore this rare and irreplaceable forest to its former glory and preserve it for future generations.

Thank you to volunteer Liz Bracken for this wonderful photo!
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#WoodlandTrust#LochArkaig#CaledonianPinewood#Lochaber#ScottishHighlands#WestHighlands

Remember Nellie's tree from our #TreeOfTheYear contest? After winning the UK and English competition, this romantic tree is in the running to be named European Tree of the Year 2019. We need your help to secure a place in history for Vic and Nellie’s story and their tree!

Nearly 100 years ago, Vic Stead would walk to the nearby village to visit Nellie, the young lady he was courting. One day, he came across three beech saplings on his route, and grafted one sapling between the other two to form the letter N, in an attempt to woo his sweetheart. Vic and Nellie would go on to marry and have a family, and although they are both gone now, Nellie’s tree, also known as the Love Tree, still remains.
Cast your vote at www.treeoftheyear.org/ (link in bio too!)🌳

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