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Whitney Museum of American Art  The Whitney houses one of the world's foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art. Grams by Sarah Meller in Marketing.

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#ElizabethCatlett concluded The Negro Woman series with a depiction of a single African American woman's upturned face. Her pose suggests that she is contemplating the experiences of those who came before, while also preparing for what may lie ahead. Catlett once told fellow artist and writer Samella Lewis: “I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential… I have learned from many people: from the restlessness and inquisitiveness of the young, from my mother, from other Black people who have struggled to better themselves… We have to create an art for liberation and for life.” She gave this final print the title "My right is a future of equality with other Americans" (1946). See the entire series later this spring as part of a new permanent collection exhibition. #WhitneyCollection #BlackHistoryMonth
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[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), My right is a future of equality with other Americans, 1947, printed 1989. From the series The Negro Woman. Linoleum cut, sheet: 10 5/16 × 7 1/2in. (26.2 × 19.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 95.203. Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

For "In Phillis Wheatley I proved intellectual equality in the midst of slavery," #ElizabethCatlett depicted Wheatley, the first African American to publish a book of poetry (Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, 1773), with her quill poised over a fresh page. The women standing behind her with shackled hands offer a biting reminder that Wheatley achieved prominence despite being enslaved by a white family in Boston. Her writings inspired many who were active in the movement to end slavery.
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This week, we're featuring prints from Elizabeth Catlett’s The Negro Woman series. The entire series will go on view later this spring as part of a new permanent collection exhibition. You can see them all by tapping the link in our profile. #WhitneyCollection #BlackHistoryMonth
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[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), In Phillis Wheatley I proved intellectual equality in the midst of slavery, 1946, printed 1989. From the series The Negro Woman. Linoleum cut, sheet: 10 9/16 × 7 9/16 in. (26.8 × 19.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 95.196. Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

#ElizabethCatlett's In Harriet Tubman I helped hundreds to freedom (1946) celebrates Tubman's guidance of travelers along the Underground Railroad. In Catlett's depiction, Tubman points assuredly ahead. Yet she also looks cautiously over her shoulder, a gesture that reminds the viewer of the palpable risks she faced while helping others.
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This week, we're featuring prints from Elizabeth Catlett’s The Negro Woman series. The entire series will go on view later this spring as part of a new permanent collection exhibition. You can see them all by tapping the link in our profile. #WhitneyCollection #BlackHistoryMonth
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[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), In Harriet Tubman I helped hundreds to freedom, 1946, printed 1989. From the series The Negro Woman. Linoleum cut, Sheet (Irregular): 10 1/4 × 7 3/4in. (26 × 19.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 95.194. Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

For the title of each print in The Negro Woman series, #ElizabethCatlett used the first person as a way to connect to the experiences of other African American women, whether they labored in fields, worked in domestic settings, or fought for social reform. The title "In Sojourner Truth I fought for the rights of women as well as Negroes" commemorates Truth's struggle for the abolition of slavery and women's rights, and invokes this historical predecessor as a revolutionary touchstone for contemporary action.
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This week, we're sharing prints from Elizabeth Catlett’s The Negro Woman series. The entire series will go on view later this spring as part of a new permanent collection exhibition. You can see them all by tapping the link in our profile. #WhitneyCollection #BlackHistoryMonth
***
[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), In Sojourner Truth I fought for the rights of women as well as Negroes, 1947 (printed and retitled In Sojourner Truth I fought for the rights of women as well as Blacks, 1989). From the series The Negro Woman. Linoleum cut, Sheet: 10 1/4 × 7 3/8in. (26 × 18.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 95.195. Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

#ElizabethCatlett’s The Negro Woman series commemorates the courage, strength, and leadership of African American women. Created at the Taller de Gráfica Popular (People’s Graphic Workshop) in Mexico City, the fifteen linoleum cuts form a sequential narrative that celebrates black women’s contributions as field laborers, domestic workers, educators, and activists. Catlett hoped her art would stimulate social change: “Art for me now must develop from a necessity within my people. It must answer a question, or wake somebody up or give a shove in the right direction—our liberation.”
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This week, we will feature five of the fifteen prints in the series, starting with the opening print, I am the Negro Woman, 1947 (printed and retitled I am the Black Woman, 1989). The series will go on view later this spring as part of a new permanent collection exhibition. You can see them all by tapping the link in our profile. #WhitneyCollection #BlackHistoryMonth
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[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), I am the Negro Woman, 1947 (printed and retitled I am the Black Woman, 1989). From the series The Negro Woman. Linoleum cut, Sheet (Irregular): 10 1/8 × 7 9/16in. (25.7 × 19.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 95.189. Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

It’s never too early to start planning for next weekend! This coming Friday, join us at 6:30 pm for a salon with curators and scholars exploring works on view in Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s. Participants include @rossbleckner, @Walterrobinsonstudio, @roomwithabiew, Lowery Stokes Sims, and Wendy White. An open discussion will conclude the program. Tickets at the link in our profile! #1980sPainting [Installation view of Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, January 27–May 14, 2017). 📷 by Ronald Amstutz]

Today marks the 10th (!) day of Orbit. 3 artists are living around-the-clock in the narrow space between the windowpanes of our theater. The enclosed environment has everything they need: composting toilet, plants (thanks to @dianamaeflowers), and a food & water supply. Observe their project through this Sunday at 12 pm. #OrbitREDINVIEW #REDINVIEW [MPA with Amapola Prada and Elizabeth Marcus-Sonenberg, Orbit (part of the exhibition RED IN VIEW), February 15, 2017, at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 📷 © Paula Court]

When the Worlds Collide...in more ways than one! @kennyscharf made this painting in 1984 in his good friend #KeithHaring's studio. On the bottom right of When the Worlds Collide, you can see Scharf's version of a Haring baby on a little pedestal, which the artist calls "my little thanks" to Haring for letting him use his studio. The wall paper beneath Scharf's work is from a floor-to-ceiling mural that Haring made for the Pop Shop, a retail store in downtown Manhattan that he opened in 1986. The Pop Shop derived from Haring's long-held desire to increase the accessibility of his art. Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s curator Jane Panetta hung these works on the entry wall of the exhibition to demonstrate the blurring of boundaries emblematic of the decade. #1980sPainting

🔴Orbit update! 🔴3 artists are living in the narrow space between the windowpanes of our theater. Today is day 7!
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The performance, part of the exhibition MPA: RED IN VIEW, is inspired by the simulation projects conducted by universities and space agencies to test human life on spacecrafts and Mars. The enclosed environment includes a composting toilet, plants, and food & water. Visit the theater to see them during regular Museum hours, OR 24/7 by looking up from the corner of West & Gansevoort Streets through Sunday. #OrbitREDINVIEW #REDINVIEW

A #ValentinesDay sentiment that transcends the decades: this 1988 painting by #AndrewMasullo is made on a found panel and features an excerpt from Edna St. Vincent Millay's sonnet "What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why” written in 1920. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet often wrote on love, desire, and feminism. ❤️💔 #Valentine #1980sPainting #Poetry #WhitneyMuseum [Andrew Masullo (b. 1957), 1918, 1988. Oil on found wood, 17 7/8 × 15 1/16in. (45.4 × 38.3 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner P.2014.23. © Andrew Masullo]

“‘Fast Forward’ reveals a complex subject crying out for attention by outlining how the Neo-Expressionists and their ’80s cohort broke painting wide open. Their legacy is a sense of freedom and possibility that infuses the medium to this day.” —@robertasmithnyt on our new exhibition focusing on #1980sPainting from the collection. Tap the link in our profile to read more! #WhitneyMuseum [Left, Kathe Burkhart’s painting “Prick: From the Liz Taylor Series (Suddenly Last Summer),” from 1987, reprises a movie scene with Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift. Right, “Baron Sinister” from 1986, by Walter Robinson. 📷 by @JakeNaughton for @NYTimes]

Final weekend! It's your last chance to see the full two-floor exhibition Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney's Collection, which mines the Museum's holdings to offer new perspectives on one of art’s oldest genres. See works by Glenn Ligon, Alice Neel, and Andy Warhol, among others. Floor 7 will remain on view through April 2. #WhitneyPortraits #WhitneyMuseum