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Whitney Museum of American Art  The Whitney houses one of the world's foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art. Grams by Sarah Meller in Marketing.

http://whitney.org/

Now on view in our new exhibition An Incomplete History of Protest, #MelvinEdwards’s Pyramid Up and Down Pyramid (1969) was first seen at the Whitney in the artist's 1970 solo exhibition. Constructed from barbed wire, the work connotes prisons, animal pens, and physical pain within the vocabulary of minimal sculpture. The artist #DavidHammons remarked of Edwards’s work in the 1970 Whitney exhibition: “That was the first abstract piece of art that I saw that had cultural value in it for Black people. I couldn’t believe that piece when I saw it because I didn’t think you could make abstract art with a message.” Edwards himself said: “All systems have proven to be inadequate. I am now assuming that there are no limits and even if there are I can give no guarantees that they will contain my spirit and its search for a way to modify the spaces and predicaments in which I find myself.” #WhitneyCollection

#SarahCharlesworth’s The Arc of Total Eclipse, February 26, 1979 from the #WhitneyCollection belongs to her series Modern History, which examines how photographic images function within the editorial practices of newspapers. For this work, the artist selected as her subject front-page coverage from locales across the path of the 1979 solar eclipse over North America. Charlesworth removed all written language except for the mastheads in her actual-sized re-presentations of these 29 newspapers. Although they represent the same spectacle, the images vary, as do their size and position, depending on the publications’ photographers and editors and on the relative importance of the unseen articles sharing the page. The result is a visual allegory of how varied media perspectives contribute to an understanding of the world. Charlesworth remarked: “The eclipse interested me metaphysically, because there wasn’t any single image that was consistent, or even any single point in time represented. Each town along the eclipse path had its own experience of the same event.” #SolarEclipse2017 #EclipseDay
[Details of The Arc of Total Eclipse, February 26, 1979, 1979, from the series Modern History, 1977–2003. Twenty-nine gelatin silver prints, dimensions variables. Edition of 3. Purchase with funds from the Photography Committee 94.60a–cc. © The Estate of Sarah Charlesworth]

Works by #AlexanderCalder are activated every day during #CalderHypermobility!
***
Monday–Thursday:
12, 2 & 4 pm
Friday:
12, 2, 4, 7:30, 8 & 9 pm
Saturday:
11 am; 12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
Sunday:
11 am; 12, 1, 2, 3 & 4 pm

Open today: An Incomplete History of Protest looks at how artists from the 1940s to the present have confronted the political and social issues of their day. Whether making art as a form of activism, criticism, instruction, or inspiration, the featured artists see their work as essential to challenging established thought and creating a more equitable culture. The exhibition offers a sequence of historical case studies focused on particular moments and themes—from questions of representation to the fight for civil rights—that remain relevant today. At the root of the exhibition is the belief that artists play a profound role in transforming their time and shaping the future. #WhitneyCollection
[Installation view of #NancySpero's Hours of the Night (1974) and #EdwardKienholz's The Non War Memorial (1970)]

We got a first look at An Incomplete History of Protest, opening this Friday. The wall pictured here is part of a gallery titled “Mourning and Militancy,” which is what activist and critic Douglas Crimp argued was required to address the AIDS crisis. During the 1980s and 1990s, AIDS and complications from it killed nearly half a million people in the U.S., a disproportionate number of them gay men and people of color. The artist community lost thousands; still more friends, lovers, and family members faced lives transformed by grief, fear, indignation, and illness. Many artists made activist work that criticized government inaction, promoted awareness and treatment, and expressed support for people fighting and living with the virus. #WhitneyCollection

Meet Max and Sam! These two Amazon parrots inhabit #HélioOiticica's Tropicália (1967), the first of four portraits of Brazil, and Rio in particular, that Oiticica would create over the course of his career. In the installation, Oiticica addresses a series of clichés associated with tropicalness using sand, gravel, lush foliage, and exotic birds. Max and Sam are on loan from @AHelpingWing, a parrot rescue center in New Jersey. While in residence at the Whitney—the parrots will return to their caretakers following the exhibition—they are being cared for by Museum staff members who have received training from A Helping Wing employees (they are also regularly checked on by our friends at the Center for Avian and Exotic Medicine).

Walking around #HélioOiticica’s NC6 Medium Nucleus 3 (NC6 Núcleo medio 3) (1961–63) to get a better look! This large golden-orange sculpture is from a series Oiticica called the Nuclei. In 1959, the geometric forms that had populated the artist’s early paintings on cardboard began to take to the air. These works established a physical relationship to the viewer in a way that Oiticica couldn’t achieve through his flat paintings on the wall: viewers have to walk around the works in order to fully experience them.

Summer Fridays were made for the Whitney! We're open till 10 pm tonight with pay-what-you-wish beginning at 7 pm. Explore the outdoor galleries, walk barefoot in the sand in #HélioOiticica, or have a drink on the terrace at Studio Cafe. #LarryBell #WhitneyMuseum [📷 by Ian Allen]

#SneakPeek: We recently acquired a significant collection of protest posters against the war in Vietnam, a selection of which will be presented for the first time as part of the exhibition An Incomplete History of Protest, opening next Friday. Posters were essential tools of education and persuasion in the antiwar movement. Produced rapidly and often distributed for free, they appeared everywhere—from public spaces to college dorm room walls. Much like Internet memes today, these posters combined image and text in compelling ways and were lacerating in their critique. #WhitneyCollection

A catnap pictured by #EdwardHopper purrfectly encapsulates a lazy summer day. 😸💤 #InternationalCatDay
[Edward Hopper (1882–1967), detail from Study of a Sleeping Cat, 1895–99. Graphite pencil on paper. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art]

Opening next week: Through the lens of the #WhitneyCollection, An Incomplete History of Protest looks at how artists from the 1940s to the present have confronted the political and social issues of their day. Whether making art as a form of activism, criticism, instruction, or inspiration, the featured artists see their work as essential to challenging established thought and creating a more equitable culture. The exhibition foregrounds concepts—from questions of representation to the fight for civil rights—that still incite protest today, both at the Whitney and in the world. Members will see the new exhibition first during special preview days on August 16 and 17. Tap the link in our profile to join. [#AnnetteLemieux (b. 1957), Black Mass, 1991. Latex, rhoplex, gesso, and oil on canvas, 95 13/16 × 105 × 1 13/16 in. (243.4 × 266.7 × 4.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Promised gift of Emily Fisher Landau © Annette Lemieux]

#AndyWarhol was born #onthisday in 1928! Warhol based $199 Television (1961), his earliest painting in the #WhitneyCollection, on small black-and-white ads from the newspaper. See it on view in Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney's Collection, 1900–1960. 📺

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