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Whitney Museum of American Art  The Whitney houses one of the world's foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art. Grams by Sarah Meller in Marketing.

http://collection.whitney.org/artist/621/EdwardHopper

Get to know #HélioOiticica! This Saturday at 3 pm, we're screening a documentary about the Brazilian artist by his nephew, filmmaker César Oiticica Filho. Through rare archival audio and visual material, the documentary allows Hélio Oiticica himself to narrate his life and expound upon his art in his own words. The artist’s commentary guides us through his artistic development and expansive political and aesthetic interests, from his modernist paintings and sculptures in the 1960s to his expanded cinema installations and slide show environments of the 1970s, and from the favelas and the lively street life of Rio de Janeiro, New York City, and London to samba schools and the Tropicália cultural movement. After the screening, join us for a Q&A with the filmmaker, as well as the curators of the exhibition @donna_de_salvo and Elisabeth Sussman. Free with Museum admission!

This fall, we're thrilled to present @toyinojihodutola's first solo museum exhibition in New York! Opening October 20, the exhibition will present a series of interconnected fictional portraits chronicling the lives of two aristocratic Nigerian families. Enigmatic and mysterious, these life-size figures appear alone or in groups, set against luxurious backdrops of domesticity and leisure. Highly attentive to detail and the nuances of space, class, and color—whether of palette or skin—Ojih Odutola considers questions of narrative, authenticity, and representation.
[#ToyinOjihOdutola (b. 1985), Pregnant, 2017. Charcoal, pastel and pencil on paper, 74 1/2 x 42 in. ©Toyin Ojih Odutola. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York]

Did you know the #WhitneyCollection is home to over 3,100 works by #EdwardHopper? In honor of the artist's birthday today, tap the link in our profile to explore his works online or see these in-person in the exhibition Where We Are. #bornonthisday

Happy birthday to artist #AlexanderCalder! The exact date of Calder’s birth is a bit of mystery—Philadelphia's City Hall, the doctor who delivered him, and his own family all offer differing accounts as to whether it's on July 22 or August 22. As for Calder, he celebrated both. Who can argue with that? 😉 #otd #calderhypermobility [Alexander Calder with Gamma, 1947, and Sword Plant, 1947, Alexander Calder, Buchholz Gallery/Curt Valentin, New York, 1947. © 2017 @CalderFoundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

“I wanted to elevate television to an art form that was as highly valued as the music of Johann Sebastian Bach.”—#NamJunePaik, born #otd in 1932. V-yramid (1982), shown here installed in the 2015 exhibition America Is Hard to See, is a ziggurat of forty television sets of decreasing size. Made for the artist’s retrospective at the Whitney in 1982, the work draws a visual analogy between ancient pyramidal architecture and modern media technology. 📺#WhitneyCollection #TBT [📷 by Ron Amstutz]

#HélioOiticica's work is “alive in a way almost no art feels now,” proclaims @nytimes. Tap the link in our profile to read more about Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium, the Brazilian artist's first full-scale U.S. retrospective in two decades. [📷 by Matthew Carasella]

Artist #ChristianMarclay is performing #AlexanderCalder’s first hanging mobile, Small Sphere and Heavy Sphere (1932/33), with cellist @Okkyung_Lee this Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. The mobile consists of two spheres—a heavy iron sphere and a smaller wooden one—that hang on either end of a horizontal iron rod. Everyday objects such as glass bottles, a tin can, and a wooden crate are situated on the floor by the viewer. When the iron sphere is activated, the wooden sphere is propelled on an unpredictable series of misses and collisions with these objects. Small Sphere and Heavy Sphere is an open composition: Calder did not set any final placement of the objects; instead, he intended the viewer to step into the role of composer and determine the arrangement, thereby removing the artist's control. Can’t make these performances? Our specially trained art handlers will activate the work in an arrangement determined by Marclay throughout the week during Museum hours. Tap the link in our profile to buy performance tickets and to view a complete activation schedule. #CalderHypermobility [Small Sphere and Heavy Sphere, 1932 / 1933. © 2017 @CalderFoundation, New York / Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York]

#AlexanderCalder's Blue Feather (1948) comes to life in this enchanting #flipbook. Check out more at the #MuseumShop! #CalderHypermobility [© 2017 @CalderFoundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

Taking in #WillaNasatir's large, six-part installation made specifically for her new exhibition (opened yesterday!). Nasatir's compositions are highly manipulated, but primarily through analogue rather than digital means. The artist begins by creating makeshift sculptures in her studio, altering found objects ranging from decorative fans to car headlights. Nasatir then photographs the elements, routinely reflecting light onto the print using mylar or plexiglass, and then rephotographs the image.

Immerse yourself in #HélioOiticica: To Organize Delirium, opening today! The exhibition is the Brazilian artist's first full-scale retrospective in the U.S. in 2 decades, with a particular focus on the years he spent in New York. Oiticica’s work began with formal, geometric investigations in painting and drawing and eventually took the form of large-scale installations and environments, as well as experimental writing, filmmaking, and photography.

A #tbt in celebration of #nationalfrenchfryday! 🍟#ClaesOldenburg has famously written that he is "for an art that...twists and extends and accumulates and spits and drips, and is heavy and coarse and blunt and sweet and stupid as life itself." In this commitment to imbue his art with the energy of "life itself," Oldenburg has frequently turned to commonplace objects as his subject matter, transforming them through unexpected contexts, materials, or scale shifts. Though his earliest works were in canvas, he discovered that using vinyl provided the desired contrast between hard and soft and the manufactured and the handmade. French Fries and Ketchup (1963), shown here installed in the Breuer building in 2009, is among his early vinyl works. #WhitneyCollection

#Sneakpeek of #HélioOiticica: To Organize Delirium, opening this Friday! The exhibition is the Brazilian artist's first full retrospective in the U.S. in two decades, with a particular focus on the years he spent in New York. Oiticica’s work began with formal, geometric investigations in painting and drawing and eventually took the form of large-scale installations and environments, as well as experimental writing, filmmaking, and photography. As his career advanced in Brazil, New York, and beyond, his work became increasingly immersive, transforming the viewer’s role from spectator to active participant. Check out our Story to see more! And feel free to remove your shoes to get in the mood. 👟

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