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“I feel like sometimes when I talk about ‘Transparent,’ I’m in a cult,” actress Amy Landecker said of her experience starring in the Amazon series. “And in some ways, I guess I sort of am.” Landecker, of course, isn’t in a cult – to her, being in this cast as eldest daughter Sarah is a “religious experience.” @transparentamazon returns with its fourth season today. Read more her interview with our friends at @thelilynews through the link in our bio. (Photo by @brinsonbanks)

This week’s foreign correspondent spotlight comes to us from the Gaza Strip.

An electricity crisis, sparked by a feud between Hamas, which controls #Gaza, and the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank, has added to Gaza's woes in recent months. Raw sewage has been pumped into the sea as treatment plants have ceased to function. Salaries have also been cut increasing economic pressure.
Still, some people enjoy the seafront cafes like this one, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea.

Jerusalem bureau chief @lovedaymorris captured this shot last week.

Park View’s vibe is distinctive. It's just a quarter of a square mile in area but its colorful rowhouses stand out in a streetscape similar to other Washington neighborhoods like Adams Morgan and Woodley Park. It's soundtrack is played on full volume each night: the rhythmic thud of basketballs on cement courts, the chorus of bugs singing in the trees and muffled music seeping from passing car windows. Scroll through the photos to see more views of this vibrant D.C. neighborhood. (Photos by Calla Kessler/The Washington Post)

Hurricane Maria churned across Puerto Rico Wednesday as the most powerful storm to strike the island in more than 80 years. It ripped roofs off buildings, filled homes with water, and knocked out power to the entire population. As homes shook and glass windows shattered from the force of the storm, residents took refuge at places like Roberto Clemente Coliseum, pictured above, which is the largest shelter on the island. (Photo Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post) #hurricanemaria #Sanjuan #puertorico

After a 7.1-magnitude earthquake struck 76 miles southeast of Mexico City, residents dug through immense piles of pancaked rubble that had once been high-rise buildings, searching for survivors. Our Mexico Bureau Chief, @partlowj , captured this video as volunteers worked side by side to clear away chunks of concrete in the dusty air. Throughout the city, they formed lines to pass along containers filled with rubble and dump them into waiting trucks. #mexicocity #mexico #earthquake

Of a total of 1.1 million Rohingya that remained in Burma despite repeated waves of violence since the late 1970s, more than 400,000 have fled to neighboring Bangladesh in just the past month. Burma’s military, together with Buddhist villagers, is terrorizing the Rohingya, emptying and razing their villages, and attempting to hound them out of the country. As the Rohingya flee persecution, conditions are dire, food is scarce and the monsoon rain is torrential. In the photo above, a Bangladeshi boy is walking toward a parked boat as smoke rises from Burma, suggesting more Rohingya homes had been set alight. (Photo: Dar Yasin/AP) #burma #rohingya #myanmar

Watch as the Washington Monument bisects the rising sun on Sept. 16. This specific view comes from the Netherlands Carillon in Virginia. #🌅 (Video by Kevin Ambrose)

Carter “Quis” Hill was perched in his car seat as glass shattered all around him. A bullet had burrowed into the 4 year old's head, an inch above his right temple. Blood trickled down over his eyes, along his nose and into his mouth. The 36-pound preschooler had become one of the nearly two dozen children shot every day in the United States. Soon after, a white Pontiac blew past, disappearing into the distance. His mother, Cecelia Hill, knew it was the same car that had been chasing them for miles before someone inside fired eight shots in an extraordinary act of road rage. Hill faced forward and punched the gas, pushing the speedometer past 100 mph. She veered off an exit, stopped and leapt out of the car before a passing driver pulled up and called 911. “Please don’t let my son die,” prayed Hill, a 27-year-old housekeeper who had raised her kids mostly alone. But in the back of her mind, she feared it might already be too late. Read Carter's full story through the link in our bio. (Photos by Ricky Carioti/ The Washington Post)

This week's foreign correspondent spotlight comes from @erinmcunningham.

On the European side of Istanbul lie these Ottoman-era Süleymaniye Mosque towers. The neighborhood is one of the oldest in the city, home to historic sites and colorful bazaars. Terrorist attacks and political unrest have caused a downturn in tourism in Turkey in recent years, but the area remains of hub of local commerce.

Cassini crashed and burned – literally. After launching almost 20 years ago on Oct. 15, 1997, the @nasa spacecraft completed its mission of surveying Saturn and its surrounding moons in a fiery plunge to the very planet it was sent to see.
And, in case you’re wondering, Cassini's trip was always going to end this way. Bye, Cassini 👋

This image, one of many captured by #Cassini, was taken earlier this year. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via AP)

This salad of shredded chicken tossed with a colorful slaw of red bell pepper, green cabbage and carrot is designed to hold up well in the refrigerator. It's an ideal make-ahead dinner, packed lunch or potluck party dish. The key is to store its aromatic and Asian-inspired dressing separately, then toss it with the salad within several hours, or right before serving. For the whole recipe, click the link in our bio, via our friends at @wapofood (Photo: Goran Kosanovic/For The Washington Post)

Like many northeastern cities, Washington has long struggled with rodents. But the problem has recently reached record levels in the nation’s capital, driven by a combination of factors. The city’s booming population, combined with hundreds of new restaurants and bars, means a lot more trash. Recent mild winters mean fewer rats die from frigid temperatures. And construction across The District has disrupted subterranean burrows, sending the creatures scurrying onto sidewalks, residential yards and into homes. (Photos by @salwangeorges /The Washington Post)

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