uppatree uppatree

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Shauna ( Upp ) Mullins  Lover of life, looser of keys, fan of breakfast for dinner. Photographer • SF & beyond

http://www.blog.uppatree.com/

#Homeschooling at the #beach = Life Goals

NorCal State Competition take II. A little power outage, and 24 hour delay can't keep this team down. Let's go @accelgymnasticsteam , you got this!

Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951) was a mother, grandmother, daughter, and wife. Tragically, Mrs. Lacks past away from cervical cancer at at age 31. However her cells live on today, 66 year after her passing, and have been essential to developing the polio vaccine, in vitro fertilization, gene mapping, and cloning. They have been used to develop cancer drugs, HIV treatment, Parkinson’s disease and hundreds of other applications. Her cells were the first immortal human cells ever grown in culture.
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Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the only hospital in the area that treated black patients, with cervical cancer after the birth of her fifth child in 1951. During her treatments, two tissue samples were taken from Lack's without her permission or knowledge, at the time it was not required. These samples were given to a researcher, George Gey, who labeled them with the first two letters of Henrietta Lacks's first and last name. The sample became known as HeLa. Lacks’s cells were different then the other samples that sciences had been working with for decades, her cells reproduced at a very rapid rate and could be kept alive long enough to study. This working sample divided multiple times without dying, her HeLa cells became known as “immortal”.
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Henrietta Lacks has likely contributed more to the advancement of biomedical research then any other single person in history. HeLa cells have been part of over 11,000 patents and scientist have produced over 20 tons of cell material from the cell samples taken from her. Amazingly, it wasn’t until 1970 that her family became aware of the important roll that Henrietta’s cells played in the science community. .
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Henrietta Lacks left behind a piece of herself, a legacy that lives on today in our science and medical community, saving lives and improving the health of our global community. #henriettalacks #herstory #womenshistorymonth .
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In 2010 Rebecca Skloot's book about Henrietta Lacks's life, legacy and family, "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" , made the best seller list and brought her story to the world.
Find more info by clicking the link on my bio.

Her Story: Maya Angelou (1928-2014)
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Maya Angelo (born Marjorie Annie Johnson in April 4th 1928) was an American poet, an award-winning author and civil rights activist. She was an amazingly brilliant and talented human being that persisted through adversity with grace and heart. Angelou achieved critical acclaim in 1969 with her memoir, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" , which made history as the first nonfiction best-seller by an African-American woman. .
Read more on our blog "Her Story" , link on bio.
#nationalpoetryday #BlackGirlMagic #BlackGirlFly #blackhistory #womenshistorymonth

Her Happy Place (and mine).... that #Friday feeling.

Her Story: Angela Davis .
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Angela Davis (born 1944), is an activist, scholar, politician and educator. Born in Birmingham, Alabama in an area referred to as “Dynamite Hill” because so many African American homes in this neighborhood had been bombed over the years by the Ku Klux Klan. Davis is known around the world for her ongoing work to fight all forms of oppression in the U.S. and internationally.
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Davis became politically active as a youngster in Alabama attending civil-rights activities with her mother, and continued her activism through high school and college. In 1969 that she came to national attention when she was removed from her teaching position at UCLA as a result of her social activism. She took the case to court and won her job back. In 1970 she was placed on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List on false charges and was the center of one of the most famous trials in recent U.S. history. During her incarceration, a huge international "Free Angela Davis" campaign was organized. She was acquitted in a federal trial in 1972. .
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As an activist and writer, Davis promotes women's rights, prison reform and social justice. Over the last twenty-five years, Davis has lectured in Europe, Africa, the Caribbean, the former Soviet Union and all of fifty states in America. She as authored nine books as well as numerous articles and essays the have been featured in several journals and anthologies. .
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Davis’ teaching career as a professor has included work at San Francisco State University, UC Berkeley and Mills College. She also has taught at UCLA, the Claremont Colleges, Vassar, and Stanford University. She has spent the last fifteen years at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she is now Distinguished Professor Emerita.
#womenshistorymonth #blackhistory

Her Story: Mamie Smith .
Actress and singer, Mamie Smith (1883-1946) made history in 1920 when she recorded "Crazy Blues" considered by scholars to be the very first blues recording.
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Smith was glamorous and multi-talented performer who began her career at age 10 as a vaudeville singer. She toured with the four dancing Mitchell's and other groups through her teens. By the time she was 20 she was living and working in Harlem.
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In 1918 Smith stared in "Made in Harlem" at the Lincoln Theater. The producer, Perry Bradford, also composed the song "Crazy Blues" , and asked Mamie Smith and a group of musicians called the Jazz Hounds to record it in 1920 when he was finally able to find a studio that was willing to work with them. "Crazy Blues" is widely considered the first blue song on record. It was wildly successful, selling 75,000 copies in the first few months of its release.
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Smith's recording paved the way for other black female singers to enter popular music culture. The immense popularity prompted other recording companies to sign-on other female black singers to capture the new market of Blues.
#womenshistorymonth #BlackGirlMagic #herstory #stateofwomen #shepersisted #naturalhair #naturalkids

Her Story: Viola Davis
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The amazingly talented Viola Davis (born August 11, 1965) recently made history when she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, making her the very first African-American performer to win Tony, Emmy and Oscar awards in acting categories. Only 22 others in history have accomplished this amazing honor. Davis is also the first woman of color and the first African-American actress to win five Screen Actors Guild Awards and is the first black actress to receive an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
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Davis was born on her grandmother's farm in St. Matthews, South Carolina, and grew up in Central Falls, Rhode Island where her family moved shortly after her birth. Her father worked as a horse groomer and trainer, her mother worked as a maid and factory worker. Davis reports growing up very poor, watching movies became her escape at an early age. She attended Central Falls High School where she first got involved in the arts and discovered her love for acting. After high school Davis studied theater at Rhode Island College then went on to attend Juilliard School in New York City.
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Over the course of her career Davis has played a variety of rolls and meaningful characters. Davis is a strong advocate for more relevant roles for African-American women, "It is a time when Black women now have no choice but to take matters in their own hands and create images for ourselves ... It's up to us to look for the material, it's up to us to produce it ourselves, it's up to us to choose the stories." .
@violadavis #BlackGirlMagic #womenshistorymonth #herstory #stateofwomen #shepersisted

Roger Arliner Young (1889-1964) was the first African-American woman to be awarded a Ph.D. in zoology in 1940. She was also the first African-American woman to research and publish in the field of animal biology during her Ph.D. studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Young made many scientific contributions stemming from the research she performed at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. During her career Young taught at several of universities, including Howard University, Shaw University, North Carolina, North Carolina College for Negroes, as well as at colleges in Louisiana,Mississippi and Texas. .

Roger Arliner Young was an African-American pioneer in zoology, it took grit and determination to overcome the racial and gender barriers she faced to achieve this place of honor in history.

Her Story: Toni Stone

In 1953 Toni Stone signed with the National League's Indianapolis Clowns to play 2nd base in Hank Arron’s place, making her the first woman ever to play professional baseball in the United States. During the fifty games that Stone played for the Clowns, her batting average was .243, and one of her hits was off the legendary Satchel Paige.
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Stone began playing baseball at age 10, by the time she was 15 she was playing with the St. Paul Giants, a men’s semi-professional team. Her professional career began with the San Francisco Seal Lions in 1949 where she batted in two players her first time at the plate. She went on to play for the Black Pelicans of New Orleans and the New Orleans Creoles before signing with Indianapolis. In 1953 she retired from the Kansas City Monarchs because of a lack of playing time. She spent the rest of her life in Oakland, California working as a nurse. Stone passed away in 1996 at age 75.
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While Stone was the first female player in the Negro Leagues and in professional baseball, she was not well received by the players. She was shunned and harassed, but Stone took it all in stride, and was proud that she was seen as a threat to the other players because it meant that she was a good competitor.
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Stone has been inducted into the Women’s Sports Hall of Fame as well as the International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame. She was included in two exhibits at the Baseball Hall of Fame, “Women in Baseball” and “Negro League Baseball”. Stone’s hometown of Saint Paul, Minnesota has declared March 6th as “Toni Stone Day” and they have named a baseball field after her. This rebel followed her passion and honed her talents to make a place in history for herself and blazed a trail for generations of girls to come. . “I loved my trousers. I love cars. Most of all I loved to ride horses with no saddles. I wasn’t classified. People weren’t ready for me.” -Toni Stone
#womenshistorymonth

Sojourner Truth was a womens’ rights activist and abolitionist. She was born into slavery in the State of New York c 1797 as Isabella Baumfree. When she was just 9 years old she was sold for $100 with a flock of sheep and separated from her parents and siblings. Truth suffered abuse and violence at the hands of her owner, and over the next two years she was sold twice more. In 1817 her owner arranged for Truth to marry an older slave. They had two daughters, Elizabeth and Sophia, and a son, Peter.
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The state of New York began to negotiate the abolition of slavery in 1799, but it wasn't until July 4th, 1827 that all slaves were emancipated. However, Truth took matters into her own hands in 1826, escaping to freedom with her youngest daughter. Soon after her escape Truth learned that her son Peter, who was 5 at the time, was illegally sold to a man in Alabama. She took the case to court and became one of the first black women to win a court case against a white man in the United States.
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Isabella Baumfree changed her name to Sojourner Truth in 1843 and devoted her life to Methodism, the abolition of slavery and women’s rights. She began traveling and speaking to large crowds about rights and reform. Over time her reputation grew, she was a force to be reckoned with, even in progressive circles some of her ideas were considered radical. . .
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Truth spoke passionately for the rest of her life advocating for women's rights, universal suffrage, property rights, prison reform and an end to capital punishment. She is remembered as one of the most influential leaders of the abolition movement and one of the earliest advocates of women's rights. #internationalwomensday

Barbara Hillary (1931)

Barbara Hillary was the first African-American woman to reach the North Pole in in 2007. Five years later Hillary made history again when she stepped foot on the South Pole at age 79, becoming the first African-American woman on record the reach both poles.
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Before Hillary became an adventurer she had a long career in nursing. She graduated from New York University with a Masters degree focusing on Gerontology which she applied to her career. Hillary has been a community activist is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of "The Peninsula Magazine" , a multi-racial and non-profit publication in Queens, New York. .
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Hillary survived breast cancer in her 20's and lung cancer in her 60's which became the impetus for her adventures. Since her expeditions to both polls, she has become an inspirational speaker around the world, her mission is to encourage people to live life to the fullest. But this spunky, smart, driven woman isn't not done exploring, we can't wait to hear about her next adventure! #shepersisted #blackhistorymonth #herstory #dresslikeawoman

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