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The American embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel, will be moved to Jerusalem and be opened by the end of 2019, Vice President Mike Pence said during an address to Israel's parliament on Jan. 22. Pence received a rousing ovation as he pledged to barrel ahead with a plan that has set off weeks of unrest and thrown U.S. peace efforts into disarray. The move, in the first ever address of a sitting American vice president to the Israeli Knesset, marked the highlight of Pence’s three-day visit to Israel celebrating President Trump’s decision last month to controversially recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Video sources: AP, CNN

The Philippines’ most active #volcano exploded thunderously on Jan. 22, sending a huge gray column of ash, steam and lava fragments into the sky and prompting authorities to warn a violent eruption could be imminent. The noontime explosion of Mount Mayon, seen in this timelapse video, shrouded nearby villages in darkness, officials said, the Associated Press reports. More than 27,000 villagers have fled since Mayon started acting up more than a week ago. Authorities raised the alert level to four on a scale of five, which means an explosive eruption is possible within hours or days. A danger zone around Mayon was expanded to 5 miles (8 kilometers) from the crater. Video source: AP

Aerobatic dancers under the direction of Spanish theatrical company La Fura dels Baus perform in "The Rise of the Tritons" during the opening of the European Capital of Culture program at Valletta 2018 in Malta on Jan. 20. Photograph by Darrin Zammit Lupi (@darrinzl)—@reuters

In the lower deck of a wooden boat, sub-Saharan refugees and migrants—mostly from Eritrea—wait to be rescued by aid workers from the Spanish NGO @proactivaopenarms, 34 miles north of Libya on Jan. 16. The United Nations has recorded at least 4,085 sea arrivals to Europe in 2018, with at least 184 migrants and refugees dead or missing in the Mediterranean. Photograph by @santipalacios@ap.images/@shutterstock

Speaking at the #womensmarch in Los Angeles, Natalie Portman detailed the “environment of sexual terrorism” she endured in her youth that impacted the trajectory of her career. @nportmanofficial, one of the actors behind the #TimesUp initiative combatting sexual harassment and abuse in Hollywood and other industries, said she experienced sexual harassment at the age of 13 when her first film, 1994’s Léon: The Professional, came out. Her first-ever piece of fan mail, she said, was a rape fantasy written by a man. Her local radio show created a countdown to her 18th birthday, “euphemistically,” she told the crowd of 500,000 people, “the date that I would be legal to sleep with.” And movie reviewers would mention her “budding breasts” in reviews. Portman said she rejected roles with a “kissing scene” and developed a reputation as “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious, in an attempt to feel like my body was safe and my voice would be listened to.” Video source: CNN

"I am speaking today not just for the 'me toos'—because I was a #metoo," @violadavis told a crowd on Jan. 20 during the #womensmarch in Los Angeles. "But when I raise my hand I am aware of all the women who are still in silence. The women who are faceless. The women who don't have the money and don't have the constitution and who don't have the confidence. And who don't have the images in our media that gives them a sense of self worth enough to break their silence that's rooted in the shame of assault." The Academy Award-winning actress took the podium as thousands of women and men in Los Angeles, and across the country, marched on the one-year anniversary of President Trump's inauguration. Video source: CNN #womensmarch

Across the globe on Jan. 20, people hit the streets on the anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration to march against his policies and in support of the #MeToo movement. In Palm Beach, a group of women wearing red cloaks and white hats like the characters in the book and TV show “The Handmaid’s Tale” marched in formation, their heads bowed. Elsewhere around the U.S., people congregated in New York, Chicago, Houston, Denver, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and more. They were among more than 200 such actions planned for the weekend around the world. Video sources: CNN, CrowdSpark, AP #womensmarch

Participants attend a rally to honor the one-year anniversary of the Women's March and Park City's March on Main on Jan. 20, 2018. Tens of thousands of women and men packed streets across the country on Saturday, uniting in a call for social change on the first anniversary of the inauguration of President Trump. Photograph by Angela Weiss (@angelaweissphoto)—@afpphoto/@gettyimages #womensmarch

It is perhaps apt that @nasa is studying #Antarctica the same way it often studies distant worlds—from above, with a flying collection of multisensory instruments. And it is perhaps apt too that so many of the pictures could pass for ones of the barren moon; of broken Mars; of the great, cracked ice-cover of Jupiter’s moon Europa. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined NASA's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula, chronicling the toll of #climatechange on polar ice. Over the course of eight- to 12-hour expeditions covering up to 2,500 air miles out and back, the flights maintained an average cruising altitude of just 1,500 ft.—and sometimes much lower. Read the TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME

This massive chunk of free-floating sea ice is about 100 ft. thick from waterline to top—or roughly the height of a 10-story building. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined @nasa's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula. Scientists onboard surveyed the state of the ice with a suite of instruments. No single mission is likely to produce breakthrough results. Rather, the flights yield cumulative data—sometimes granular­ ­findings that can add to the overall picture of polar melt. Read the TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME #antarctica #climatechange

Climate change has become our species’ great destructive equalizer, leaving no part of the planet safe from the harm we do. In March 2017, the sea ice around both poles reached a record low for that time of year. In July, a 1 trillion–ton iceberg, roughly the size of Delaware, calved off of the Larsen C ice shelf in western Antarctica. The damage to the ice is being done not just from above, as the planet’s air warms, but from below, as its oceans do too. In November, @pellegrinpaolo joined @nasa's IceBridge mission for a series of research flights over the west Antarctic peninsula. Scientists onboard surveyed the state of the ice with a suite of instruments including laser altimeters, radars, magneto­meters and gravimeters. No single mission is likely to produce breakthrough results. Rather, IceBridge flights yield cumulative data—sometimes granular­ ­findings that can add to the overall picture of polar melt. Read the full TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Video by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME #Antarctica #climatechange

A crevasse measuring a few thousand feet, seen during a November research flight with @nasa scientists studying the toll of #climatechange on the west Antarctic peninsula. NASA has long employed satellites to monitor weather and climate from space, but the most detailed work requires getting a lot closer. The agency's IceBridge mission fills that gap. Established in 2009, it's an annual series of flights over both polar regions, surveying the state of the ice. Over the course of eight- to 12-hour expeditions covering up to 2,500 air miles out and back, the flights maintain an average cruising altitude of just 1,500 ft.—and sometimes much lower. "Over some mountain ranges we get pretty low, maybe 100 ft. or less," says Nathan Kurtz, the project scientist—NASA-speak for boss. "We leave those decisions to the pilots." Read the full TIME International cover story, and see the full photo essay, on TIME.com. Photograph by @pellegrinpaolo@magnumphotos for TIME

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