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Immigrant children, many of whom have been separated from their parents under a new "zero tolerance" policy by the Trump administration, walk in a single-file line between tents in a compound next to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tornillo, Texas, on June 18. Even as images of children held in chain-link pens and audio of toddlers crying in detention facilities were broadcast on Monday, the administration doubled down on its policy of separating parents and children apprehended at the #border. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen delivered an unyielding performance in the White House briefing room, defending the practice and calling on lawmakers to overturn it with a sweeping #immigration overhaul. Nielsen denied that it is designed to deter other families and said the separations are the result of loopholes in the law that need to be fixed. Within hours, she was contradicted by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who acknowledged in a Fox News interview that prosecuting parents and separating them from their children is, in part, meant to send a signal to others: “Yes, hopefully people will get the message,” Sessions said, “and come through the border at the port of entry and not [come] across the border unlawfully.” President Trump remained defiant during remarks at the White House, saying the U.S. “will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility.” He continued to attempt to deflect blame for his own administration’s policy onto political opponents, adding: “I say it’s very strongly the Democrats’ fault.” Photograph by Mike Blake (@msk8blake)—@reuters

#WorldCup fans look on during a match between Tunisia and England at Volgograd Arena on June 18. Two goals by @harrykane, including a header in the 90th minute, lifted England to a 2-1 victory over Tunisia. Photograph by Gleb Garanich—@reuters

Jesse Starr III, 50, poses with his 28-year-old son, Jesse Starr IV, in Jackson, Miss. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "To raise a black man in this society, I was fortunate enough to be able to be raised around a father that was in the workforce, and he was a teacher. So I saw a work ethic early," the elder Starr told Roye. "And then I have a bloodline of just hustlers and entrepreneurs, so that just gave me the work ethic to know that you’ve got to have your own business... All black men in America and beyond need to have their own business." For more photos, and to hear more stories, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Shaykh Abdur Rashied, 70, with his son Malcolm Matthews, 20, in Chicago. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "I realized at an early age that he was a very spiritual guy. But he had his own mind," Rashied told Roye. "He would have to learn just from observing me." For more photos, and to hear more stories, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Victor P. Mason, sheriff of Hinds County, poses with his son, Christopher Mason, 35, in Jackson, Miss. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "When I became an officer in law enforcement in the early ’80s, I knew how the environment was here, so I didn’t want my son to be a victim. I wanted him to be a vessel," the 62-year-old told Roye. "I was very protective of [my sons], but I let them get their knees skinned. I would take him to the funeral home. I would let him see bodies in the back that were shot up because guys were trying to commit crimes, and let him know this was just one-way; there are consequences." For more photos, and to hear more stories, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Remi Bereola, 38, poses with his 4-year-old son, Kaden, in Oakland. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "Every day, we talk about how our day was and about being a leader and a good listener and a good helper," Bereola told Roye. "His school is African-centered and teaches the greatness of precolonial kings and kingdoms, rather than him learning about slavery as if that were our first entry point into history. My father is Nigerian, so we make sure that’s a part of his understanding of who he is-that when he enters in the room, he has that greatness that he carries within him." For more photos, and to hear more stories, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Fredrico Don Broom, 41, with his sons Vincent, 7, in lap, and Diego, 12, in Catonsville, Md. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "I teach my sons that when life gets hard, never give up. There was a time when I was going to lose it all. It was on #FathersDay," Broom told Roye. "I work as an engineer, in my father’s footsteps. I got a call from my job: to come in, stabilize the boiler room. Before I could leave, one of the stabilizer tanks exploded. I got cracked across the head. I was out for 2½ years. I sold everything I had just to keep a roof over our heads. To keep things afloat, I started my own business. It’s always good to show a physical example of strength, determination and the willingness to never give up." For more photos, and to hear more stories, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Dame Drummer, 40, poses with his son, Damon, in Oakland. On assignment for TIME in recent weeks, photographer @ruddyroye, a father of two boys, met with black dads across America to hear about their fears and hopes for their sons in America today. "I know that I have a special boy," Drummer told Roye. "But my reality as a father is, one day, this 10-year-old could not come home—at the hands of foolishness or hatred or misunderstanding." What advice has Drummer told his son? “Take your life one day at a time, man. Don’t let this world suck you into it with the illusions of happiness and the illusions of self-worth. Be your own man. Make your own mind. Have your own decisions. And above all, don’t be afraid of anything.” For more photos, and to hear more stories on this #FathersDay, visit TIME.com/black-fathers. Photograph and interview by @ruddyroye for TIME

Iceland, the smallest country ever to qualify for the #WorldCup, scored a 1-1 draw in its tournament debut against Argentina on June 16. That impressive finish was made possible in part when the Nordic island nations' goalie, Hannes Thór Halldórsson, saved a penalty kick by @leomessi in the 64th minute. All eyes in Iceland were on the squad—nicknamed Strákarnir Okkar, or “Our Boys”—ahead of the match. TIME recently spent a few days with the team in Reykjavík as the players trained for the World Cup. Read our recent International cover story on the ultimate underdog at TIME.com. Photograph by @thomas_prior for TIME

Border Patrol agents on horses track a man along the Rio Grande River after he illegally crossed into the U.S. from Mexico in Sunland Park, New Mexico, onJune 15. Photograph by @adreeslatif@reuters

A two-year-old Honduran girl cries as her mother is searched and detained near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas, on June 12. They were in a group of asylum-seekers who had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents, before being sent to a processing center for possible separation. In early May, the Trump Administration announced a “zero tolerance” agenda on the U.S. border. The policy seems simple: anyone who crosses the border without authorization is subject to prosecution for a federal misdemeanor, which can result in a sentence of 180 days for a first offense. Because children can’t be jailed alongside adults, minors must be separated and kept in juvenile facilities while their moms or dads are incarcerated. The crackdown on prosecutions has triggered an explosion of family separations. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families at the border over a six-week period in April and May, according to government figures obtained and reported by the Associated Press on June 15. The separations of 1,995 minors from 1,940 adults, between April 19 and May 31, were not broken down by age; they included separations for illegal entry, #immigration violations or possible criminal conduct by the adult, the AP adds. Photograph by @jbmoorephoto@gettyimages

In less than a year, Donald Trump went from threatening Kim Jong Un with annihilation to the first face-to-face talks between a sitting U.S. President and a North Korean leader. The summit on June 12 was the latest and most dramatic example of how the impulsive President is upending the global order. Days earlier, after a testy economic gathering with six of America's closest allies, Trump watched Canadian Prime Minster Justin Trudeau declare that new U.S. trade tariffs were unfair and ordered his aides to back out of thar summit’s final communiqué, which had already been publicly released. That’s how things work now. Early on, Trump heeded his top aides when they urged caution. In the past six months, he has taken increasingly dramatic risks—especially in foreign policy. In December, Trump committed to moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, overriding the dire predictions about Middle East chaos. In March, he threatened to impose stiff trade tariffs on China and Europe, then enacted them two months later after global markets generally bounced back from initial losses. In May, he withdrew the U.S. from the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, even though Europe, international agencies and some of his own senior aides said Iran was complying with it. Trump has become energized by the idea that he’s shattering precedent, and feels vindicated by the results of his moves, according to interviews with more than a dozen friends, aides and former officials. “He recognizes that people always are running around, it seems, with their hair on fire,” senior White House aide Kellyanne Conway told TIME. Nowhere are the stakes are higher than in North Korea. Read this week’s full cover story on TIME.com. Photograph by Kevin Lim (@limkevo)—@straits_times/@gettyimages. Animation by @brobeldesign for TIME

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