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The Broad  The Broad is a contemporary art museum in #DTLA. Visit us with friends & fam this holiday - book free general admission 🎟 to skip the line!

New on view! The Broad presents a new monographic gallery featuring poignant works from #BroadCollection artist #RobertLongo. “My work exists somewhere between movies and monuments,” says the artist. Longo explores the importance of images in popular culture and the stereotypical portrayals of the individual’s alienation within a complex society. His aesthetic and conceptual approach came to symbolize the changing landscape of 1980s New York City—with its rapid gentrification, vibrant nightlife, and ascendant stock market. Longo’s images depict violent physicality and psychological angst motivated by an undefined source left to the viewer’s speculation. Here, Longo commemorates a historic moment, featuring a crowd of women at an anti-Trump rally in New York in early 2017. Book your advance tickets to see this and other new installations, link in bio. #NowOnView
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Robert Longo, Untitled (Black Pussy Hat in Women's March), 2017. Charcoal on mounted paper. © Robert Longo

The Broad's building has a signature detail on our façade facing Grand Avenue - do you know what it’s called? Hint: on the other side of the window is the space where we host lectures, performances, and workshops. Comment with your answer below and we’ll gift the FIRST person to answer correctly a pair of VIP General Admission passes to skip the line during the holidays - with access to #YayoiKusama's Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away!
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📷 @theotamvakis

London-born artist Cecily Brown shied away from the buzzing "Young British Artists" movement and took her work to New York City in the early 1990s where her practice garnered a lot of attention. Through her work, Brown explores how painting can illuminate the erotic charge of the human form. Building on the overtly sexualized female figures and all-over compositions developed by male artists like #WillemdeKooning, she creates paintings that successfully subvert her male abstract expressionist predecessors and creates a space for women artists in the genre of grotesque. In Tender is the Night, the figure is not immediately apparent, but mixed into the jabs and tangles of yellow and flesh-toned paint is a female form on all fours. Though not overt in the carnal details that the pose conjures, the work suggests a state of hazy ecstasy; the figure’s immersion into her frenetic surroundings points to a moment of pure instinct, when consciousness and the physical world become one. #OnViewNow #WomenArtistsWednesday
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Cecily Brown, Tender is the Night, 1999. Oil on linen. © Cecily Brown

Tan Tan Bo a.k.a Gerotan: Scorched by the Blaze in the Purgatory of Knowledge (2018) is The Broad's latest acquisition by artist @takashipom. Murakami’s influence on Japan rivals Andy Warhol’s on the United States, and he is known for disseminating and promoting pop art strategies in ways unforeseen by American critics and artists. Unifying many strands of culture that are frequently considered in opposition—traditional Japanese painting with Western influences, the realm of fine art with otaku lifestyle (juvenile culture obsessed with toys, anime, and video games), and commercial retail spaces with museums and other public venues—Murakami’s work is recognized for its ambition, polish, and fine execution. His artistic practice is expansive, spilling into fashion, film, and other commercial areas, but his symbols and interests come from deeper impulses. Come see this new work alongside your favorite Murakami works this holiday season. Skip the line and book your tickets in advance! Link in bio.
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Takashi Murakami, Tan Tan Bo a.k.a Gerotan: Scorched by the Blaze in the Purgatory of Knowledge, 2018. Acrylic on canvas mounted on board. © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

Happy birthday to #BroadCollection artist Julie Mehretu! The Ethiopian-born, New York-based painter and printmaker produces her works much in the way a city gathers its memories. She starts each painting with a geometric structure that serves as the basic anchor and organization for the image. From that point on, Mehretu’s method is intuitive: she adds and subtracts images and drawings according to how she envisions the painting’s resolution. These actions are the literal history of Mehretu’s process—some marks exist in the completed work, other marks appear only as ghosts or memories that have partially disappeared. The highly worked, finished piece acts as a timeline of weather and events, as if it is the unexpected result of the original geometry, the outcome of something that did not quite go according to plan.
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In the Conjured Parts series, the artist titles paintings by pairing various body parts such as “heart” and “head” with places such as Aleppo and Homs in Syria, suggesting both physical experiences and sites of political strife. Conjured Parts (eye), Ferguson (2016) is an abstract painting composed of gestural marks and lines of muted colors. Beginning with a photograph from Ferguson, Missouri, Mehretu blurs and layers ink and paint to the point of complete abstraction, leaving no pictorial cue of the tragic event it reflects. Instead, what remains is a feeling, an experience, and an association through language.
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Find this work and others #OnViewNow in our central gallery on the third floor.
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#JulieMehretu, Conjured Parts (eye), Ferguson, 2016. Ink and acrylic on canvas. © Julie Mehretu, Photo by Cathy Carver. Congress, 2003. Ink and acrylic on canvas. © Julie Mehretu. Invisible Sun (algorithm 8, fable form), 2015. Ink and acrylic on canvas. © Julie Mehretu, Tom Powel Imaging. Cairo, 2013. Ink and acrylic on canvas. © Julie Mehretu

“I didn’t want a completely passive viewer. I wanted to make work where the viewer wouldn’t walk away; he would either giggle nervously, get pulled into history, into fiction, into something totally demanding and possibly very beautiful.”—Kara Walker
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Happy birthday to #BroadCollection artist @kara_walker_official! Walker’s body of work recovers the iconography of the antebellum South, exploring the intersectionality of race, gender, and sexuality. Walker is known for her revival of the 19th century art of silhouetting, reinterpreting it to create intense explorations of the dynamics of power. Her cutouts are nearly life size and depict scenes of degradation, sex, and violence as she paints the history of pre–Civil War race relations and the current tensions of today. Political, funny, and beautiful, these satirical comments on race, slavery, lust, and domination generate controversy from all sides. View her monographic gallery on our third floor featuring works like African’t, pictured here. #OnViewNow
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#KaraWalker, African't, 1996. Cut paper on wall. © Kara Walker. 📷 @brucedamonte. Photo of Kara Walker at The Broad’s Un-Private Collection talk with the artist and director Ava DuVernay. 📷 Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging.

On Fridays we match! 👯‍♀️
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#fanfriday #repost 📷 @danielleduffpix
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Mark Tansey, Four Forbidden Senses, 1982. Oil on four canvas panels. The Broad Art Foundation. © Mark Tansey

Today we want to express how thankful we are for YOU. Thank you for bringing your friends and family to experience the art on view or our public programs – and for sharing your photos of the museum and your visits! We know that it has been especially difficult for so many of us during the last few weeks, and we hope that we can offer an inclusive and safe space to gather, reflect, find inspiration, and enjoy art. Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at The Broad!
📷 @sanjeet_mukadam, @loveartluna, @e92mac, and @lotsohbear
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#repost #fanphoto #thankful #thanksgiving #thankyou #gratitude

Bonjour! ¡Hola! Xin Chào! Kumusta! Today, The Broad celebrates #WorldHelloDay and all the languages spoken by our staff and visitors alike. We currently offer weekly tours as well as brochures in English and Spanish. Our VSAs speak many languages including Armenian, French, Italian, Mandarin, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Comment below and say “Hello” in your favorite language!

When you visit The Broad, take a 57-second ride up our 105-foot long escalator to the third floor, and don’t forget to look up as you arrive! Our permanent collection on the third floor is illuminated by diffused natural light, thanks to the innovative skylights in our stunning structure that was designed by @diller_scofidio_renfro.
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Can you guess how many north-facing skylights cover our third floor galleries? Comment below with your best guess and the 2 closest winners will each receive 2 VIP general admission passes to skip the line and see Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Years Away. Submissions will close Wednesday, November 28 at 11 am PT. Winners will be contacted via direct message the same day. Good luck!
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📷 @captureimaging

Our hearts are with everyone in Los Angeles and California who have been impacted by the terrible events of the past week. Our deepest thanks to the first responders who have risked their lives to keep us safe, and to all the heroes out there working to help those who are suffering. ❤️
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Andreas Gursky, Los Angeles (detail), 1998. Chromogenic print mounted on Plexiglas in artist's frame. The Broad Art Foundation. © Andreas Gursky / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn [Not on view]

Mark Bradford engages the discarded materials of urban life, often remnants of informal economic systems that arise out of necessity in the inner city. Bradford, whose mother ran three hair salons, was born and raised in Los Angeles. From early on, he used the materials found around salons, including the paper rectangles used for permanents, bobby pins and hair dyes. Over time, his art making grew to include video, installation and photographs, alongside his continued interest in printmaking and collage.

The layers in Scorched Earth create a topography that represents the deep psychological and physical ruins of a disappeared people and another time and place. In this work, Bradford depicts an aerial map of an area that has been blacked out. The blackness of this land mass resonates on many levels: black as in the demographics of this neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, at one time called “Negro Wall Street,” where many black-owned businesses thrived, until a race riot erupted in 1921 and the violence obliterated this unique area and its history; black, as the title suggests, meaning burnt or scorched; black as in redacted; and black as in nothingness.
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#MarkBradford, Scorched Earth, 2006. Billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, carbon paper, acrylic paint, bleach and additional mixed media on canvas. The Broad Art Foundation. © Mark Bradford
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#AmericaRecyclesDay

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