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The Colorful World of Etro: There have been a lot of family businesses in fashion, and for good reason. Providing a clan is functional, the attendant mutual support can build, reinforce and protect a singular vision. Missoni, Versace and Hermès are a few examples. The Milan-based Etro, run by 78-year-old patriarch Gerolamo Etro, known as Gimmo, and his four children, is another. Known for a cheeky take on traditional luxury and wild, mismatched fabrics—especially its over-the-top paisleys—the family-owned-and-operated Etro has thrived in mainstream categories like menswear and womenswear, accessories and perfume by bucking the conventional practice of scaling up. Where others tend to hire experts or outsource to produce as they expand into new areas, the Etros have transcended their original mission of high-end textile design the old-fashioned way: with all hands on deck, learning as they go. “We were taught to be curious,” says Veronica Etro, the creative director of womenswear and the baby of the bunch at 43. Etro family values, she explains, mean “everyone was brought up to search for beauty, for the new.” Pictured is the office of Kean Etro, 53, creative director of menswear. Read the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: Alexandra Marshall, 📸: @luca.campri) #WSJMagazine #Etro

Kick the dust up...
💃🏻✨ Photography: Lachlan Bailey
Model: Anja Rubik
Styling: Geraldine Saglio
Hair: Rudi Lewis
Make-Up: Petros Petrohilos
#wsjmagazine

Smile! It's Friday. And it's almost #sweaterweather! @jean_campbell wears @balenciaga photographed by @angelopennetta and styled by @emimikareh for the #septemberissue of @wsjmag ❤️ #wsjmagazine #biggestissueever

Faretta wears Givenchy in Venice, 2017.
WSJ Magazine
#georgecortina
#mariosorrenti
#givenchy
#christiaan
#aarondemey
#faretta
#wsjmagazine

As London's iconic River Cafe celebrates its 30th anniversary with a new book, chef and co-founder Ruth Rogers reflects on the establishment’s evolution in our upcoming September Women's issue. “There were two kinds of restaurants back then,” Rogers says of the restaurant's early days. “You either got dressed up and were intimidated by the scary chef, sommelier and waiter, or you went to the local trattoria and had a good time but probably didn’t eat very well. We thought, Well, why can’t you have the fun and drama you’d have at a trattoria but eat really well, too?” Read the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: @howiekahn, 📸: @bailey_studio) #WSJMagazine

Saturday night swing state from our upcoming September Women's Style issue. Move freely in fluid separates ✨✨ See the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (📸: @studio_jackson, styling by @sagliogeraldine) #WSJMagazine #metallics

“Being an artist is a self-determined activity. You just say you’re an artist and let the chips fall where they may," says Kiki Smith in our September issue cover portfolio of the Venice Biennale. "I don’t make art every day. When I’m in New York, I work from 10 to 6 but sometimes the gardens or housecleaning takes over. [Productivity] is a mysterious thing because you don’t know what’s productive or not. Sometimes when it doesn’t look like you’re working, you are. It’s good for artists to have something that takes them out of their houses and out of their brains. When I was young, a man told me that your work shouldn’t be so idiosyncratic and personal that people can’t find an entrance for themselves into it, and it can’t be so general that they can’t see what you have at stake in it. You want to feel that people have something profound at stake in your work, and at the same time you want to be able to fill your life with it. It’s not that you want to see your own experience, but you want to have your own experience. It’s like a mirage.” Read it 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: @tgebremedhin, 📸: @mario_sorrenti) #WSJMagazine #KikiSmith

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Greek Revival by Katerina Tsigarida Architects.
The covered courtyard with a well (at right) was built in 1477, the paint colours are original to the house, but have been refreshed using traditional powder pigments.

The Colorful World of Etro: There have been a lot of family businesses in fashion, and for good reason. Providing a clan is functional, the attendant mutual support can build, reinforce and protect a singular vision. Missoni, Versace and Hermès are a few examples. The Milan-based Etro, run by 78-year-old patriarch Gerolamo Etro, known as Gimmo, and his four children, is another. Known for a cheeky take on traditional luxury and wild, mismatched fabrics—especially its over-the-top paisleys—the family-owned-and-operated Etro has thrived in mainstream categories like menswear and womenswear, accessories and perfume by bucking the conventional practice of scaling up. Where others tend to hire experts or outsource to produce as they expand into new areas, the Etros have transcended their original mission of high-end textile design the old-fashioned way: with all hands on deck, learning as they go. “We were taught to be curious,” says Veronica Etro, the creative director of womenswear and the baby of the bunch at 43. Etro family values, she explains, mean “everyone was brought up to search for beauty, for the new.” Pictured is the office of Kean Etro, 53, creative director of menswear. Read the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: Alexandra Marshall, 📸: @luca.campri) #WSJMagazine #Etro

Bern - Switzerland

Kick the dust up...
💃🏻✨ Photography: Lachlan Bailey
Model: Anja Rubik
Styling: Geraldine Saglio
Hair: Rudi Lewis
Make-Up: Petros Petrohilos
#wsjmagazine

As London's iconic River Cafe celebrates its 30th anniversary with a new book, chef and co-founder Ruth Rogers reflects on the establishment’s evolution in our upcoming September Women's issue. “There were two kinds of restaurants back then,” Rogers says of the restaurant's early days. “You either got dressed up and were intimidated by the scary chef, sommelier and waiter, or you went to the local trattoria and had a good time but probably didn’t eat very well. We thought, Well, why can’t you have the fun and drama you’d have at a trattoria but eat really well, too?” Read the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: @howiekahn, 📸: @bailey_studio) #WSJMagazine

Daniel Storto | Autumn 2017 | My design studio during the 80s and 90s was located in Pasadena California in a former office occupied by Albert Einstein. My work changed dramatically. | Lambskin Leather | Hand Sewn [needle thread thimble only] | Image Daniel Storto 2017
#antoinearnault #axeldumas #pierrealexisdumas #francoispinault #cathyhoryn #guytrebay #robertasmith #tmagazine #vanessafriedman #vogueitalia #voguejapan #wsjmagazine #wmagazine #artforum #acnepaper #greymagazine #gentlewomanmagazine #lofficielparis #systemmagazine #blackandwhitephotography #hanyayanagihara #loveofglove

1987 + Now = Fashion Joyride #wsjmagazine #herringbone #ralphlauren #giorgioarmani #fendi #ferragamo ... & the inimitable #tatjanapatitz

Saturday night swing state from our upcoming September Women's Style issue. Move freely in fluid separates ✨✨ See the story 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (📸: @studio_jackson, styling by @sagliogeraldine) #WSJMagazine #metallics

Via @wsjmag (and thank you for sending @mikalbx and @asweliveandeat) x
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“Being an artist is a self-determined activity. You just say you’re an artist and let the chips fall where they may," says Kiki Smith in our September issue cover portfolio of the Venice Biennale. "I don’t make art every day. When I’m in New York, I work from 10 to 6 but sometimes the gardens or housecleaning takes over. [Productivity] is a mysterious thing because you don’t know what’s productive or not. Sometimes when it doesn’t look like you’re working, you are. It’s good for artists to have something that takes them out of their houses and out of their brains. When I was young, a man told me that your work shouldn’t be so idiosyncratic and personal that people can’t find an entrance for themselves into it, and it can’t be so general that they can’t see what you have at stake in it. You want to feel that people have something profound at stake in your work, and at the same time you want to be able to fill your life with it. It’s not that you want to see your own experience, but you want to have your own experience. It’s like a mirage.” Read it 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: @tgebremedhin, 📸: @mario_sorrenti) #WSJMagazine #KikiSmith

“Being an artist is a self-determined activity. You just say you’re an artist and let the chips fall where they may," says Kiki Smith in our September issue cover portfolio of the Venice Biennale. "I don’t make art every day. When I’m in New York, I work from 10 to 6 but sometimes the gardens or housecleaning takes over. [Productivity] is a mysterious thing because you don’t know what’s productive or not. Sometimes when it doesn’t look like you’re working, you are. It’s good for artists to have something that takes them out of their houses and out of their brains. When I was young, a man told me that your work shouldn’t be so idiosyncratic and personal that people can’t find an entrance for themselves into it, and it can’t be so general that they can’t see what you have at stake in it. You want to feel that people have something profound at stake in your work, and at the same time you want to be able to fill your life with it. It’s not that you want to see your own experience, but you want to have your own experience. It’s like a mirage.” Read it 🖥: now, 📰: August 26. (🖊: @tgebremedhin, 📸: @mario_sorrenti) #WSJMagazine #KikiSmith

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