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#windowtax

MAIS RECENTES

In 18th century Britain you were taxed upon how many windows you had, so to avoid tax people would brick up their windows 🤓 #symmetry #whitewall #windowtax #kingwilliam #historylesson #minimalist #whitelines #londonhistory #geometrical #uselessfacts

This week we are busy getting some final quotes for building work before the scaffolding goes up ☹️ It’s going to be dirty work, but will provide much needed repair to our roof, chimneys, gutters and rendering. We will also be having insulation installed to this ice bucket 👏🏼 Once complete, we can get cracking on the exciting stuff and begin with the interiors 😊 🎨#oldhouses #windowtax #georgianhouse #home #homeimprovement #georgianwindows #renovation #diy #countrylife #yorkshire #highmoorhouse

On the plus side at least the AC units sort of disappear. #purple #windowtax #airconditioning

a sneak peek at our second planning application of 2018, it’s for a new build house in Surbiton... 🤞🏼

Meard street, soho W1- one of my favourite streets in #london, it takes you back in #time 🧐 #georgianarchitecture #georgianhouse #london #soho #beautiful #windowtax

When in London we discovered a lot about the city’s east end where we were staying, a good deal due to the East End Food Tour we took with Eating Europe. More than just a food experience, we learned about the neighbourhood’s evolution and history.
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Like the Window Tax. Did you know in the early 1700’s people were charged a tax based on the number of windows in their residence? You’ll notice in some of these homes, windows bricked up as a way to avoid paying this tax.
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You can see highlights from our tour on our YouTube.com/EverythingMom channel.
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#history #eastendlondon #londoneats #londoneastend #travelgram #traveligers #travelwithkids #familytravel #wanderlust #explorelondon #visitlondon #eatingeurope #foodtour #foodiefamily #travelblogger #architecture #windowtax #instatravel #exploretheworld #traveldiary

A side door of an old mansion in Bristol, UK. I learned that the Windows Tax was first introduced to England in the 1696. Even though it was repealed about 150 years later, it was brought back in the 18th century. It was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. Many landlords of rich mansions like this one would brick up their big glass doors and windows, replaced them with everything else to avoid tax. That explains so many buildings with tiny windows in the England. The law was abolished in the winter of 1850 and was substituted with inhabited houses in 1851.
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#england #architechture #windows #buildings #bricks #law #propertytax #windowtax #taxlaw #greatbritain #bristol

Window tax blank windows. This must be the only building I've seen with such a high ratio of blank v actual windows #camden #london #igerslondon #windows #blankwindow #falsewindow #windowtax

Many of our historical buildings show the legacy of the “Window Tax”. You may have noticed that some of our old homes have bricked up or filled in windows. Some properties were built in such a fashion to balance the look of a building but for many their windows were filled in to avoid paying a tax that was introduced in 1696.
n 1696 under the reign of William III a new act called “Act of Making Good the Deficiency of the Clipped Money” was introduced. The law-makers at the time thought it was only fair that those living in big houses paid more tax as they were deemed to be better off. For this reason this new act became known as the “tax on light and air” and although it is not recorded it is widely thought that the saying “Daylight robbery” originates from the introduction of this Act.

It was a banded tax, for instance, in 1747 for properties with ten to fourteen windows paid a total of 4 shillings and for over 20 windows homeowners paid 8 shillings. The tax was raised six times between 1747 and 1808. By then the lowest band started at six windows which was raised in 1825 to eight windows.

For many property owners the only way to avoid paying the tax was to brick up windows. The building of new properties during this period also reflected tax avoidance as they were built with fewer windows and historical records show that the production of glass from 1810 to 1851 remained the same despite the housing boom at the time.

#interiorexteriorblogger #exterior #exteriordesign #histroy #brickedupwindows #windowtax #instagood #instadaily #blogger #design #architecture

Not even a window of opportunity here. #windowtax, #pittstreet, #kensington #w8#roomwithoutaview

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