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#unnecessaryinterventions

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This was Leona's costume on her birthday last year. 🎉😂
We were 8 days past our due date and declined to be induced the day before. We went on to complete a 65# Grace 🏋🏻 in 3 mins flat at Barbells for Boobs 🎀 and Movember fundraiser at the gym. It was the top time in the scaled division, but turns out Joshy G ✌🏼️couldn't find✌🏼️our score card. 😜 We proceeded to PR another race a few hours later. ☺️💪🏼👶🏼 #halloweenbaby 🎃#mileycyrus #wreckingball #paradisocrossfit #venicebarbellclub #41weeksand1daypregnant #unnecessaryinterventions 🙄#birthfit #raisingLeona 10/31/15

Yup, it does, I know because I researched it, a LOT.

I have previously mentioned that my first birth was a traumatic hospital birth, I won't go into details now, but it would be easy to extrapolate to say that the reason why my second birth was a planned homebirth was because I didn't want to birth in hospital, that I was perhaps too scared to go back.

This assumption would be incorrect.

The truth?! A traumatic birth led me to ask a LOT of questions and do a LOT of reading and research. How could I avoid the negatives that occurred? Don't rely on a hospital system that treats you as a number, don't birth with someone who doesn't understand or support your birth plan AND homebirth is statistically proven to be the safest place to birth to avoid unnecessary interventions. And, so, I considered homebirth with a private midwife. As a medically-minded scientist I was skeptical, I trust medicine. But, do you know what I innately trust more? Biology. Physiology. Evolution. When these things are supported then medicine and surgery are rarely needed.

As a vet, most illness occurs and medical intervention is required when the husbandry isn't right - ie. when the body isn't provided with everything that it needs to function optimally. A lot of veterinary medicine focuses on preventative medicine, and when it comes to birth, animals rarely need help except when human intervention tends to cause issues or when rare obstetrical problems occur.

Humans are the same. Society over the past couple of generations has convinced us that birth needs a hospital. Some births, women or babies require a hospital. The majority do not. And, no, before the common reply "but if I wasn't in hospital I/my baby would have died" pops up... No, just no. The majority of interventions are physiologically unnecessary. The majority of these lead to the Cascade of Intervention (ie. More intervention). Most 'complications' such as "failure to progress", maternal/uterine exhaustion, "retained" placenta, haemorrhage, etc. are secondary to interventions or bad advice (such as coached pushing or not 'allowing' the mother to choose her own positions during labour).

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There is an old saying: When you’re holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Likewise, for hospital-based birth attendants, it is easy to become accustomed to treating every birth as a disaster waiting to happen. Many obstetricians have lost touch with the possibility of normal birth, so much so that even labor that includes a pitocin induction with an epidural, a fetal scalp electrode and a vacuum extraction is called a “natural” birth. Some hospital staff seem offended by the idea of minimizing interventions, as if preferring not to have a needle the size of a house nail inserted near your spine is the same as declining to have a second piece of Aunt Sally’s fruitcake. Sadly, some of today’s younger doctors may never even have seen a truly physiological labor and birth—a birth completely without medical intervention. This is how the saving grace of the hospital can become the scourging disgrace of maternity care. In their rush to prevent problems that aren’t happening, hospital personnel may aggressively push procedures and drugs that can actually cause problems. Pitocin can cause uterine contractions so strong that they stress the baby and cause fetal distress. IV narcotic drugs can affect an infant so strongly that he might not breathe at birth— a second drug is used to counteract the narcotics to help these drugged babies breathe. There is considerable debate as to how epidurals affect the progress of labor, but they certainly diminish a woman’s ability to get into a squat, which opens the pelvic plane by 20 to 30 percent; anyone can understand that this could affect the possibility of the baby’s fitting through the pelvis. Epidurals can lower the mother’s blood pressure so that the baby isn’t getting enough oxygen through the placenta. This can cause fetal distress and the need for an emergency caesarian section to rescue the baby. Perhaps the best-known risk of hospital birth is hospital-acquired infections. The people most susceptible to such infections are those with compromised immune systems, such as newborns. In particular, a baby is born with a sterile skin and gut that are supposed to be colonized by direct contact with the (cont. below)👇

Yup, it does, I know because I researched it, a LOT.

I have previously mentioned that my first birth was a traumatic hospital birth, I won't go into details now, but it would be easy to extrapolate to say that the reason why my second birth was a planned homebirth was because I didn't want to birth in hospital, that I was perhaps too scared to go back.

This assumption would be incorrect.

The truth?! A traumatic birth led me to ask a LOT of questions and do a LOT of reading and research. How could I avoid the negatives that occurred? Don't rely on a hospital system that treats you as a number, don't birth with someone who doesn't understand or support your birth plan AND homebirth is statistically proven to be the safest place to birth to avoid unnecessary interventions. And, so, I considered homebirth with a private midwife. As a medically-minded scientist I was skeptical, I trust medicine. But, do you know what I innately trust more? Biology. Physiology. Evolution. When these things are supported then medicine and surgery are rarely needed.

As a vet, most illness occurs and medical intervention is required when the husbandry isn't right - ie. when the body isn't provided with everything that it needs to function optimally. A lot of veterinary medicine focuses on preventative medicine, and when it comes to birth, animals rarely need help except when human intervention tends to cause issues or when rare obstetrical problems occur.

Humans are the same. Society over the past couple of generations has convinced us that birth needs a hospital. Some births, women or babies require a hospital. The majority do not. And, no, before the common reply "but if I wasn't in hospital I/my baby would have died" pops up... No, just no. The majority of interventions are physiologically unnecessary. The majority of these lead to the Cascade of Intervention (ie. More intervention). Most 'complications' such as "failure to progress", maternal/uterine exhaustion, "retained" placenta, haemorrhage, etc. are secondary to interventions or bad advice (such as coached pushing or not 'allowing' the mother to choose her own positions during labour).

Mamas, this is true.
But exercising while pregnant CAN significantly reduce the risk of interventions such as C-sections, medically necessary or not.
The truth is, many OBs also favor C-sections because they get paid more.
In both the US and Canada.
This has been confirmed by my brother who is currently doing his medical residency.
PREPARE for birth. In every way. Start with the right kind of fitness.
I can help ❤️
#wholehealthyfit #prenatalfitness #prepareforlabor #prepareforbirth #personaltrainer #prenatalexercisespecialist #correctiveexercisespecialist #pregnancy #wellness #csection #unnecessaryinterventions #knowyourrights #parentnotpatient
#Repost @improvingbirth with @repostapp
・・・
As the World Health Organization (WHO) reminds us, cesareans should only be performed when medically necessary with the focus being on the needs of the patient.
#CAM2017 #cesareanawarenessmonth (For more from the WHO: http://bit.ly/2oqRTjo)

#Repost @disosgirl with @repostapp
・・・
This was Leona's costume on her birthday last year. 🎉😂
We were 8 days past our due date and declined to be induced the day before. We went on to complete a 65# Grace 🏋🏻 in 3 mins flat at Barbells for Boobs 🎀 and Movember fundraiser at the gym. It was the top time in the scaled division, but turns out Joshy G ✌🏼️couldn't find✌🏼️our score card. 😜 We proceeded to PR another race a few hours later. ☺️💪🏼👶🏼 #halloweenbaby 🎃#mileycyrus #wreckingball #paradisocrossfit #venicebarbellclub #41weeksand1daypregnant #unnecessaryinterventions 🙄#birthfit #raisingLeona 10/31/15

This was Leona's costume on her birthday last year. 🎉😂
We were 8 days past our due date and declined to be induced the day before. We went on to complete a 65# Grace 🏋🏻 in 3 mins flat at Barbells for Boobs 🎀 and Movember fundraiser at the gym. It was the top time in the scaled division, but turns out Joshy G ✌🏼️couldn't find✌🏼️our score card. 😜 We proceeded to PR another race a few hours later. ☺️💪🏼👶🏼 #halloweenbaby 🎃#mileycyrus #wreckingball #paradisocrossfit #venicebarbellclub #41weeksand1daypregnant #unnecessaryinterventions 🙄#birthfit #raisingLeona 10/31/15

Pregnancy is not a disease! Iv tweeted and shared the link to this article showing the gruelling stats of unnecessary intervention in pregnancy, there's something really wrong with the way women are treated like sick patients instead of the miraculous true state that pregnancy is! #Annesmith #pregnancy #notadisease #stophospitalizing #unnecessaryinterventions #breastfeedingbasics #pregnancyisnormal #normalprocess #notsick #pregnancyiswonderful #luckytobepregnant

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