[PR] Gain and Get More Likes and Followers on Instagram.

#tihumanelement

101 posts

TOP POSTS

"My love of science and passion for creative, innovative thinking led me to my career in engineering. Technology is fun and exciting because it makes the impossible possible. I thrive in that kind of environment. And I’m passionate about STEM education – particularly for girls and women – because it strengthens critical thinking and leads to innovation. I want women to understand that there are great opportunities in engineering for people who love solving puzzles, but who may not imagine themselves in the field of science, technology, engineering or math. This is a great time to be an engineer." - Cecelia Smith, TI vice president and general manager, Mixed Signal Automotive #TIHumanElement #DriveWithUs

#Repost @txinstruments with @repostapp
・・・
“I thrive on unraveling multi-dimensional, complex problems. I have interacted with people around the world in both centralized teams and in product lines, as well as participated in numerous brainstorming sessions. In the project I was responsible for, it was up to me to come up with the solution, but I had to seek out others to interact with. With their help, I achieved something that I didn’t even know I would be good at!” – Roja, a validation engineer in our Advanced Low Power Solutions (ALPS) Low-Power DC-DC in Freising, Germany, and participant in a development program for strong performers #TIHumanElement

“I think if you talk to most engineers, we consider engineering as art. Especially good engineering. I guarantee every engineer has seen a solution to a problem that is simple, elegant and absolutely beautiful. And you think, ‘Oh my gosh, that is brilliant what those people have done here. It is a perfect solution to the problem.’” - John, analog applications engineer with Precision Analog Linear in Tucson #TIHumanElement #EWeek2016

“From day one, TI has proven to be an environment where I can propose new ideas and be given the opportunity to make them happen. For example, I proposed turning a summer offer into a co-op assignment with my first boss, and became their first co-op student in Sherman. Over half of my jobs have been the result of proposing a new technical approach or a change in our business process. With time, I have developed the reputation for being able to grasp a fuzzy conceptual idea and transform it into a well-run project to make it happen.” Stephanie, technology innovation architect and recently recognized as Business Insiders Most Powerful Engineers of 2017 #TIHumanElement #GirlDay2017 #EWeek2017 #EngineersWeek

“I always tell students, ‘If you decide to study engineering and computer science, it will be tough but well worth it.’ My advice to girls specifically is stick with it. Everyone struggles, even if they don’t show it. Find a support group of other women, and together you can do it!” - Kimberly, digital content engineer for @TICalculators #TIHumanElement

“Winning Forbes’ 2017 China Best Businesswomen is the utmost encouragement for me and all females in the semiconductor industry. Even in an industry where men make up the higher share of the population, if we keep striving and pursuing our career goals persistently, women throughout China can achieve similar success. I would like to express my deep gratitude: Thanks to Forbes for this honor. Thanks to the support from my husband and parents and to the guidance and help from all my colleagues. I would especially like to convey my appreciation to Texas Instruments for providing all the equal development opportunities and comprehensive plans to cultivate talent in employees of all genders and diversified cultures,” said Sandy Hu, President of TI China and recipient of Forbes 2017 Best Businesswomen in China award. #TIHumanElement

“Many people think mentoring a robotics team requires you to be really good at building complex systems or programming. Mentoring is about so much more than the robot. It’s branding and marketing, costume and button designs and inspiring our community and the kids. It’s also about who will shape the future and learning how to work with others to accomplish what was once thought of as impossible. If robotics is not your thing, then I would encourage you to find something you enjoy and mentor on that. Today’s youth are waiting and willing to work with us to solve tomorrow’s problems. Let’s do what we can to give them a head start.” - Jason, Thin Film technician supervisor and mentor of FRC 6369 robotics team #TIHumanElement

“Innovation makes the world go round, and if you lose that, you lose everything. I started designing and building carbon fiber trombones four years ago. My dad was in the aerospace industry. He actually worked on NASA’s Apollo project, so I was exposed to composites at an early age. I always wondered what composite material would do to a brass instrument. The idea came from a combo of aerospace, music and the high-tech industry. One day I started replacing parts on my trombones with carbon fiber until I had an instrument completely made of carbon fiber. I started sending the prototypes out to friends and they loved them. Now I get orders from all over the world. I’ve been a musician all my life, but I now play in the Emerald City Band. I am the only band member who has a full-time job; the rest are full-time musicians. We travel all over the country and do more than 200 shows a year, often performing one or two shows a week." – David, UI Designer #TIHumanElement

“When I was growing up, cricket happened naturally for me, because everyone around me, including my older brothers and friends, were playing cricket. All through school and college I took every opportunity to play cricket whenever I could, thinking I would not get time for it after I got a job. I started playing more seriously after I joined TI straight from college in 1994. A few passionate cricketers at TI came together and we started playing for fun after work. We soon formed a team to compete in several inter-corporate tournaments – and even managed to win a few. Cricket has been more than a recreational hobby. It has taught me several important lessons that I continue to apply to my work today. Someone once told me that that ‘one who can lead on the cricket field can lead at work, too.’ It is no different than leading at TI, provided you really know the game. Just like in cricket, to be successful in TI, you need to be technically sound and know your fundamentals.” – Kiran, Director, high-performance analog #TIHumanElement

MOST RECENT

“Six years ago, I fractured my right knee while skiing. My doctor said it might be impossible to come back from the injury and that being a national skier was highly unlikely. But that bad news didn’t stop me. Instead, I decided to work hard at my rehabilitation with the goal of participating in a national competition. My period of rehabilitation was long, and often the possibility of skiing again was uncertain. But through hard work, patience and determination, I reached my goal. I was so thrilled when I was selected to represent Ibaraki Prefecture as a giant slalom skier for the national sports festival in Japan this past March. Although I finished in 69th place, I was happy just finishing the race. I’ve found that preparing for a race and completing my daily work are very similar. Caring for my skiing career requires skill and patience and my work also requires this same careful attention to detail. Additionally both require good time management skills. Throughout my rehabilitation and training, I relied on these strengths to help me succeed. ” -Shuji, Miho Product Engineer Analysis, #TIHumanElement

“I’m from Ethiopia and came to the United States for my studies at @uarkansas. Two of my professors were TI alumni and introduced me to the company. As an intern, I learned a lot and got some valuable, practical experience. I appreciated the interactions I had with senior technical leaders. I also realized that you learn a lot by asking the right questions and challenging the status quo. Being curious can inspire ideas in other people and sometimes lead to solutions you don’t expect. Today in my role as a product line manager, I continue to question the status quo and I encourage my team to do so as well” –Tsedeniya, product line manager, #TIHumanElement

“Winning Forbes’ 2017 China Best Businesswomen is the utmost encouragement for me and all females in the semiconductor industry. Even in an industry where men make up the higher share of the population, if we keep striving and pursuing our career goals persistently, women throughout China can achieve similar success. I would like to express my deep gratitude: Thanks to Forbes for this honor. Thanks to the support from my husband and parents and to the guidance and help from all my colleagues. I would especially like to convey my appreciation to Texas Instruments for providing all the equal development opportunities and comprehensive plans to cultivate talent in employees of all genders and diversified cultures,” said Sandy Hu, President of TI China and recipient of Forbes 2017 Best Businesswomen in China award. #TIHumanElement

“Innovation makes the world go round, and if you lose that, you lose everything. I started designing and building carbon fiber trombones four years ago. My dad was in the aerospace industry. He actually worked on NASA’s Apollo project, so I was exposed to composites at an early age. I always wondered what composite material would do to a brass instrument. The idea came from a combo of aerospace, music and the high-tech industry. One day I started replacing parts on my trombones with carbon fiber until I had an instrument completely made of carbon fiber. I started sending the prototypes out to friends and they loved them. Now I get orders from all over the world. I’ve been a musician all my life, but I now play in the Emerald City Band. I am the only band member who has a full-time job; the rest are full-time musicians. We travel all over the country and do more than 200 shows a year, often performing one or two shows a week." – David, UI Designer #TIHumanElement

“I honestly never know when I come to work in the morning what’s going to happen. It never gets boring, and I learn each day. My motto is, ‘learning from failures is essential.’ Innovation is a very, very important thing. TI is a strong driver for this. If you innovate in a very creative way, which really helps to solve certain issues in daily life, I think it correlates to good business.” – Dietmar, engineer, Germany #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“In my spare time, I’ve done a variety of DIY projects. One of my projects, which took several years to complete, was to develop an adaptable lighting system that would illuminate my garden without imposing upon neighboring properties. I started by designing and building a 40-meter fence made of stainless steel. With each fence post holding light actuators controlled by MSP430 microcontrollers, the LEDs can be individually controlled to mix red, green and blue light signals and to adjust brightness and tone. For example, if there is snow on the ground, the lights can be adjusted to reduce glare; during a more festive season, the colors can be changed and brightened. Not only do these projects solve a need, they also allow me to look at engineering more broadly than my day-to-day work, which helps me better understand and solve our customers' challenges.” – Johann, TI DIYer #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

#Repost @txinstruments (@get_repost)
・・・
“Growing up, both my dad and brothers were engineers. When I was around seven years old, I had a school project to make a fan. So I took a piece of plastic, I cut it, I drilled holes and I added nuts and screws. When I finished, I thought to myself, ‘This looks like a boy’s fan. It needs a girl’s touch.’ So I took two of my hairbands that had two red bunnies on them and added those to the fan for decoration. At school, my teacher said, ‘This is not the work of a girl! Who did this for you? Was it your dad or your brother?’ My teacher was a woman. She gave me an F. I was devastated, but I was too shy and quiet to say anything and to defend my work. I went home and told my dad, who said I needed to speak up so the teacher would know that I was capable of this work. My dad went with me to the school and told the teacher that there was no difference between boys and girls in his house. ‘She has an engineer’s brain,’ he said. I didn’t know what engineering was; I just saw my dad and brother always tinkering with things, and knew I could do the same. You may be in situations where someone discounts you or your ideas. I was then and still am an introvert. I don’t raise my voice, and I’m quiet. But there are times where you must speak up. And you have to do it right then, because someone else may not be around to do it for you. I learned a lesson from that project – I knew I was capable of doing the same things as my dad and brother, and I learned I needed to speak up for myself, and to have confidence in who I am.” – Krunali, Vice President #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“Growing up, both my dad and brothers were engineers. When I was around seven years old, I had a school project to make a fan. So I took a piece of plastic, I cut it, I drilled holes and I added nuts and screws. When I finished, I thought to myself, ‘This looks like a boy’s fan. It needs a girl’s touch.’ So I took two of my hairbands that had two red bunnies on them and added those to the fan for decoration. At school, my teacher said, ‘This is not the work of a girl! Who did this for you? Was it your dad or your brother?’ My teacher was a woman. She gave me an F. I was devastated, but I was too shy and quiet to say anything and to defend my work. I went home and told my dad, who said I needed to speak up so the teacher would know that I was capable of this work. My dad went with me to the school and told the teacher that there was no difference between boys and girls in his house. ‘She has an engineer’s brain,’ he said. I didn’t know what engineering was; I just saw my dad and brother always tinkering with things, and knew I could do the same. You may be in situations where someone discounts you or your ideas. I was then and still am an introvert. I don’t raise my voice, and I’m quiet. But there are times where you must speak up. And you have to do it right then, because someone else may not be around to do it for you. I learned a lesson from that project – I knew I was capable of doing the same things as my dad and brother, and I learned I needed to speak up for myself, and to have confidence in who I am.” – Krunali, Vice President #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“Innovation is about solving problems that make a difference. At TI, we get the chance to work on products that make the world safer, more efficient and more fun. We can channel our energy into the things that matter– and innovate in everything we do. We are creating value for the company and making an impact on the world, so that the people who come after us will be afforded the same great opportunities that we’ve been given.” –Ray, vice president of Connected Microcontrollers, and 2017 recipient of the University of Maryland’s Distinguished Alumni Award. Ray spearheaded TI’s partnership with UMD to build an interactive lab for future engineers. #TIHumanElement

“Many people think mentoring a robotics team requires you to be really good at building complex systems or programming. Mentoring is about so much more than the robot. It’s branding and marketing, costume and button designs and inspiring our community and the kids. It’s also about who will shape the future and learning how to work with others to accomplish what was once thought of as impossible. If robotics is not your thing, then I would encourage you to find something you enjoy and mentor on that. Today’s youth are waiting and willing to work with us to solve tomorrow’s problems. Let’s do what we can to give them a head start.” - Jason, Thin Film technician supervisor and mentor of FRC 6369 robotics team #TIHumanElement

"My passion is restoring analog and digital synthesizers from the 1970s and ‘80s. I am a musician, but I found I enjoyed repairing instruments even more than playing them. There is something beautiful and rewarding about taking something that is inoperable and making it play music again. These are pieces of art, and musicians are passionate about them. If they’re not repaired, they may end up in a dumpster, and then the musicians of tomorrow won’t be able to make music with them” – Steve, an employee in our applications rotation program #TIHumanElement

"When working with students, you get that sense of excitement and happiness and just joy for learning new things and that really reverberates off of me." -Austin, TI volunteer #TIHumanElement #WhyVolunteer

"Growing up we didn't have everything we have now- my brothers wore hand-me-downs, I wore their hand-me-downs, everyone was wearing hand-me-downs. But one thing I still remember to this day is bagging up all our old clothes and whenever we'd go to Mexico to visit family, we would go and donate them to families there in Mexico." -Adrian, TI volunteer#WhyVolunteer #TIHumanElement

“As a child, I experienced homelessness and hunger, and had it not been for the awesome community volunteers and organizations, I wouldn’t be where I am today. It’s important for me to give back and make a difference where I can. Each of us has a story about why we give back- there’s something we’re passionate about- whether it’s education, hunger, poverty or homelessness. Individually, we volunteer to make a difference and together, we can make an even bigger impact!” -Terri, Director of Employee Engagement #Whyvolunteer #TIHumanElement Follow along this week to hear TIers' personal stories about why they volunteer.

“The biggest way to help anyone get out of any situation is to help educate them. You would probably not be where you are if someone had not done something selflessly for you- you might not even know it. If you can show up and support these kids and show them that people do care- and what’s more important that people outside of their lives cares – I think that’s a big deal!” ––Blake, TI application developer and TI volunteer #Whyvolunteer #TIHumanElement

“Growing up in the midst of the auto industry in Detroit, I saw the importance of different layers of the supply chain – from small, neighborhood tool and die shops to the huge auto assembly plants. I always thought I would work for a Detroit auto maker but ended up at TI – a company focused on growing its share of the market for automotive ICs and dedicated to supplier diversity. As a procurement specialist, it’s rewarding to see our small suppliers collaborate with TI to develop and increase their contributions to our company and win business with other customers. I often hear people who have never been to Detroit making jokes about it or focusing on negative things they’ve heard, but when they visit or learn about the city’s history, their perspective changes. Similarly with diverse suppliers, we can’t let pre-conceived notions get in the way of seeing the positives these suppliers can bring – flexibility, nimbleness, meeting our requirements and extreme dedication, plus a huge impact on our local community.”-Brian, Women’s Business Council Southwest Buyer of the Year, 2 consecutive years #TIHumanElement

"I played baseball all through my teens, and the game has been a big part of our family. My wife and I like to travel, so we decided a few years ago it would be fun to visit all 30 major-league ballparks. We try to do four or five a year. It gives us an opportunity to explore new places and have some adventures. We went to Sonoma for a few days, enjoyed the wine country and then went to a game in San Francisco. We spent Labor Day weekend in Seattle. We did a week in New York City and saw both the Mets and Yankees. It’s fun to visit the iconic parks where the superstars played. We’re saving Fenway Park in Boston – the oldest park − for our last visit.” –Nathan, program manager, high-power audio #TIHumanElement

“Two years ago I took on a new challenge at TI by moving into a product marketing role, having been a systems engineer for the majority part of my career. What I do from day to day may have changed, but my interest in hands-on engineering remains strong- the curiosity for how things work and the drive to improve them never goes away, including things I do in my spare time. For one of my recent DIY projects, I used TI technology to turn an old tube radio from the 1960s into a music streaming device I could link wirelessly to any smartphone, tablet or notebook. Any Hi-Fi enthusiast will tell you these old radios produce an incredibly warm and rich sound, but the functionality isn't fit for the modern world. It's incredibly satisfying to draw from TI's broad portfolio and breathe new life into a device that would otherwise end up gathering dust or on the scrap heap." -Andreas, product marketing manager #TIHumanElement

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags