#tihumanelement

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Miriam: Tanja made the striking suggestion to study electrical engineering. I don’t know where I would be without her. Being an engineer is awesome and makes me see the world much differently than I did as a student. What is important to understand: we share almost everything—above all friends and experiences.
Tanja: We didn’t expect to work together, but we told ourselves why not? Miri encouraged me to apply to TI, and I took the opportunity as I wanted to be part of an innovative and internationally renowned company. With us, everything is based on reciprocity, which makes our relationship so strong. Definitely a win for me! - Miriam and Tanja, twin sisters who started at TI in November 2016 as a Field Application Associate and Technical Sales Associate, respectively #TIHumanElement

“Many people think mentoring a robotics team requires you to be really good at building complex systems or programming. Mentoring is about so much more than the robot. It’s branding and marketing, costume and button designs and inspiring our community and the kids. It’s also about who will shape the future and learning how to work with others to accomplish what was once thought of as impossible. If robotics is not your thing, then I would encourage you to find something you enjoy and mentor on that. Today’s youth are waiting and willing to work with us to solve tomorrow’s problems. Let’s do what we can to give them a head start.” - Jason, Thin Film technician supervisor and mentor of FRC 6369 robotics team #TIHumanElement

“I started a nonprofit organization in 2014 called Girls to Queens, which focuses on middle-school girls who may not have exposure to college and career resources. Our goal is to connect these young ladies with a network to engage and support them. Events introduce girls to colleges, careers and real-world skills in a safe and fun environment. Our signature program, Crowned, invites 16-20 girls on a life-changing adventure, including visiting colleges and companies, as well as engaging in real-life experiences, such as public speaking, coding a webpage and developing a business plan. The organization teaches leadership, teamwork and communication – all while embracing each other’s differences.” – Celeste, sales and digital marketing #TIHumanElement

“I think if you talk to most engineers, we consider engineering as art. Especially good engineering. I guarantee every engineer has seen a solution to a problem that is simple, elegant and absolutely beautiful. And you think, ‘Oh my gosh, that is brilliant what those people have done here. It is a perfect solution to the problem.’” - John, analog applications engineer with Precision Analog Linear in Tucson #TIHumanElement #EWeek2016

“Engineering runs in our family. Adrian, my oldest son, works in the Bay Area as a field applications engineer and my next son, Cristian, is a rising senior at Texas A&M and an intern at TI this summer. All three of us will have a degree in electrical engineering very soon. My youngest son is already enrolled in the honors engineering program at Texas A&M pursuing an electrical engineering degree. Recently, Adrian and I were discussing one of his customer’s needs, and we were able to connect the dots to a new product that would lend itself nicely to his customer’s needs. Innovation is at the heart of TI, and small conversations like these outside of work lend themselves to problem-solving. Our family is privileged to be a small part of the innovation process.” –Manny, product marketing engineer #TIHumanElement

“I always tell students, ‘If you decide to study engineering and computer science, it will be tough but well worth it.’ My advice to girls specifically is stick with it. Everyone struggles, even if they don’t show it. Find a support group of other women, and together you can do it!” - Kimberly, digital content engineer for @TICalculators #TIHumanElement

“When I was growing up, cricket happened naturally for me, because everyone around me, including my older brothers and friends, were playing cricket. All through school and college I took every opportunity to play cricket whenever I could, thinking I would not get time for it after I got a job. I started playing more seriously after I joined TI straight from college in 1994. A few passionate cricketers at TI came together and we started playing for fun after work. We soon formed a team to compete in several inter-corporate tournaments – and even managed to win a few. Cricket has been more than a recreational hobby. It has taught me several important lessons that I continue to apply to my work today. Someone once told me that that ‘one who can lead on the cricket field can lead at work, too.’ It is no different than leading at TI, provided you really know the game. Just like in cricket, to be successful in TI, you need to be technically sound and know your fundamentals.” – Kiran, Director, high-performance analog #TIHumanElement

“Innovation makes the world go round, and if you lose that, you lose everything. I started designing and building carbon fiber trombones four years ago. My dad was in the aerospace industry. He actually worked on NASA’s Apollo project, so I was exposed to composites at an early age. I always wondered what composite material would do to a brass instrument. The idea came from a combo of aerospace, music and the high-tech industry. One day I started replacing parts on my trombones with carbon fiber until I had an instrument completely made of carbon fiber. I started sending the prototypes out to friends and they loved them. Now I get orders from all over the world. I’ve been a musician all my life, but I now play in the Emerald City Band. I am the only band member who has a full-time job; the rest are full-time musicians. We travel all over the country and do more than 200 shows a year, often performing one or two shows a week." – David, UI Designer #TIHumanElement

“My brother worked with my mom at DMOS5 for a time. Everybody loved him. When he passed away at the age of 24, the management and our work teams took up a collection and were incredibly understanding of the time I needed off work. Everybody at TI who has known me and my mom through the years circled around us and held it together for us. For TI to be so understanding of the family unit and what we needed at the time was amazing.” – Michelle, a manufacturing floor runner for RFAB “I often feel that most of my can-do spirit is embodied in the strength and wisdom I’ve gained from my 27-28 years here at TI, as well as my enduring, sometimes trying, career in product engineering for LMOS and DMOS5. I was proud to know that my children, both in their own time, wanted to and thought about taking the same path for their lives.” – Dana, a product disposition engineering technician at DMOS5 #TIHumanElement

MOST RECENT

Miriam: Tanja made the striking suggestion to study electrical engineering. I don’t know where I would be without her. Being an engineer is awesome and makes me see the world much differently than I did as a student. What is important to understand: we share almost everything—above all friends and experiences.
Tanja: We didn’t expect to work together, but we told ourselves why not? Miri encouraged me to apply to TI, and I took the opportunity as I wanted to be part of an innovative and internationally renowned company. With us, everything is based on reciprocity, which makes our relationship so strong. Definitely a win for me! - Miriam and Tanja, twin sisters who started at TI in November 2016 as a Field Application Associate and Technical Sales Associate, respectively #TIHumanElement

“I started a nonprofit organization in 2014 called Girls to Queens, which focuses on middle-school girls who may not have exposure to college and career resources. Our goal is to connect these young ladies with a network to engage and support them. Events introduce girls to colleges, careers and real-world skills in a safe and fun environment. Our signature program, Crowned, invites 16-20 girls on a life-changing adventure, including visiting colleges and companies, as well as engaging in real-life experiences, such as public speaking, coding a webpage and developing a business plan. The organization teaches leadership, teamwork and communication – all while embracing each other’s differences.” – Celeste, sales and digital marketing #TIHumanElement

Beyond blessed to call this women my mom ❤️ -----------------------------------------
"I volunteer because I believe all kids deserve to feel good about themselves, and the little we can do to instill confidence so they are off to a good start is well worth it." – Faye, relationships and communications manager. She was one of about 70 volunteers who distributed school supplies and helped in other ways at the Mayor's Back-to-School Fair on Aug. 4 in Dallas. The event – sponsored in part by our company – provided free health, dental and vision screenings, haircuts, school supplies, and much more to help needy students prepare for the new school year. #TIHumanElement

"I volunteer because I believe all kids deserve to feel good about themselves, and the little we can do to instill confidence so they are off to a good start is well worth it." – Faye, relationships and communications manager. She was one of about 70 volunteers who distributed school supplies and helped in other ways at the Mayor's Back-to-School Fair on Aug. 4 in Dallas. The event – sponsored in part by our company – provided free health, dental and vision screenings, haircuts, school supplies, and much more to help needy students prepare for the new school year. #TIHumanElement

“Engineering runs in our family. Adrian, my oldest son, works in the Bay Area as a field applications engineer and my next son, Cristian, is a rising senior at Texas A&M and an intern at TI this summer. All three of us will have a degree in electrical engineering very soon. My youngest son is already enrolled in the honors engineering program at Texas A&M pursuing an electrical engineering degree. Recently, Adrian and I were discussing one of his customer’s needs, and we were able to connect the dots to a new product that would lend itself nicely to his customer’s needs. Innovation is at the heart of TI, and small conversations like these outside of work lend themselves to problem-solving. Our family is privileged to be a small part of the innovation process.” –Manny, product marketing engineer #TIHumanElement

“I hold volunteering in the community close to my heart. With support from TI, I’m able to fulfill my passion for helping those in need. Whether in big or little ways, every kind gesture makes a difference and the reward is priceless. Habitat for Humanity’s Playhouse Program is just one example of how TI gives back to the community. TI employees build, design and decorate children’s playhouses from scratch, which Habitat then donates to a local family or charity. I’m grateful to work for a company that values volunteerism.” –Martha, TI volunteer. Recently, TI made the San Francisco Business Times’ list of Top 100 Bay Area Corporate Philanthropists of 2017. #TIHumanElement #giveback #volunteer

“I believe you can pick up anything if you put your mind to it. I started making ice cream at home so I could combine flavors that you don’t typically see in stores. Now it’s a fun experiment my kids and I do all summer long, where I’m able to teach them about the math and chemistry that help make this treat tasty. Getting the flavors and consistency right is like a chemistry problem, and you have to create the correct mix of ingredients or it won’t turn out. Cooking shows don’t air the failed experiments, but I want my kids to learn the importance of trial and error.” – Kannan, engineer, audio amplifier team #TIHumanElement #nationalicecreammonth

“Six years ago, I fractured my right knee while skiing. My doctor said it might be impossible to come back from the injury and that being a national skier was highly unlikely. But that bad news didn’t stop me. Instead, I decided to work hard at my rehabilitation with the goal of participating in a national competition. My period of rehabilitation was long, and often the possibility of skiing again was uncertain. But through hard work, patience and determination, I reached my goal. I was so thrilled when I was selected to represent Ibaraki Prefecture as a giant slalom skier for the national sports festival in Japan this past March. Although I finished in 69th place, I was happy just finishing the race. I’ve found that preparing for a race and completing my daily work are very similar. Caring for my skiing career requires skill and patience and my work also requires this same careful attention to detail. Additionally both require good time management skills. Throughout my rehabilitation and training, I relied on these strengths to help me succeed. ” -Shuji, Miho Product Engineer Analysis, #TIHumanElement

“I’m from Ethiopia and came to the United States for my studies at @uarkansas. Two of my professors were TI alumni and introduced me to the company. As an intern, I learned a lot and got some valuable, practical experience. I appreciated the interactions I had with senior technical leaders. I also realized that you learn a lot by asking the right questions and challenging the status quo. Being curious can inspire ideas in other people and sometimes lead to solutions you don’t expect. Today in my role as a product line manager, I continue to question the status quo and I encourage my team to do so as well” –Tsedeniya, product line manager, #TIHumanElement

“Winning Forbes’ 2017 China Best Businesswomen is the utmost encouragement for me and all females in the semiconductor industry. Even in an industry where men make up the higher share of the population, if we keep striving and pursuing our career goals persistently, women throughout China can achieve similar success. I would like to express my deep gratitude: Thanks to Forbes for this honor. Thanks to the support from my husband and parents and to the guidance and help from all my colleagues. I would especially like to convey my appreciation to Texas Instruments for providing all the equal development opportunities and comprehensive plans to cultivate talent in employees of all genders and diversified cultures,” said Sandy Hu, President of TI China and recipient of Forbes 2017 Best Businesswomen in China award. #TIHumanElement

“Innovation makes the world go round, and if you lose that, you lose everything. I started designing and building carbon fiber trombones four years ago. My dad was in the aerospace industry. He actually worked on NASA’s Apollo project, so I was exposed to composites at an early age. I always wondered what composite material would do to a brass instrument. The idea came from a combo of aerospace, music and the high-tech industry. One day I started replacing parts on my trombones with carbon fiber until I had an instrument completely made of carbon fiber. I started sending the prototypes out to friends and they loved them. Now I get orders from all over the world. I’ve been a musician all my life, but I now play in the Emerald City Band. I am the only band member who has a full-time job; the rest are full-time musicians. We travel all over the country and do more than 200 shows a year, often performing one or two shows a week." – David, UI Designer #TIHumanElement

“I honestly never know when I come to work in the morning what’s going to happen. It never gets boring, and I learn each day. My motto is, ‘learning from failures is essential.’ Innovation is a very, very important thing. TI is a strong driver for this. If you innovate in a very creative way, which really helps to solve certain issues in daily life, I think it correlates to good business.” – Dietmar, engineer, Germany #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“In my spare time, I’ve done a variety of DIY projects. One of my projects, which took several years to complete, was to develop an adaptable lighting system that would illuminate my garden without imposing upon neighboring properties. I started by designing and building a 40-meter fence made of stainless steel. With each fence post holding light actuators controlled by MSP430 microcontrollers, the LEDs can be individually controlled to mix red, green and blue light signals and to adjust brightness and tone. For example, if there is snow on the ground, the lights can be adjusted to reduce glare; during a more festive season, the colors can be changed and brightened. Not only do these projects solve a need, they also allow me to look at engineering more broadly than my day-to-day work, which helps me better understand and solve our customers' challenges.” – Johann, TI DIYer #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

#Repost @txinstruments (@get_repost)
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“Growing up, both my dad and brothers were engineers. When I was around seven years old, I had a school project to make a fan. So I took a piece of plastic, I cut it, I drilled holes and I added nuts and screws. When I finished, I thought to myself, ‘This looks like a boy’s fan. It needs a girl’s touch.’ So I took two of my hairbands that had two red bunnies on them and added those to the fan for decoration. At school, my teacher said, ‘This is not the work of a girl! Who did this for you? Was it your dad or your brother?’ My teacher was a woman. She gave me an F. I was devastated, but I was too shy and quiet to say anything and to defend my work. I went home and told my dad, who said I needed to speak up so the teacher would know that I was capable of this work. My dad went with me to the school and told the teacher that there was no difference between boys and girls in his house. ‘She has an engineer’s brain,’ he said. I didn’t know what engineering was; I just saw my dad and brother always tinkering with things, and knew I could do the same. You may be in situations where someone discounts you or your ideas. I was then and still am an introvert. I don’t raise my voice, and I’m quiet. But there are times where you must speak up. And you have to do it right then, because someone else may not be around to do it for you. I learned a lesson from that project – I knew I was capable of doing the same things as my dad and brother, and I learned I needed to speak up for myself, and to have confidence in who I am.” – Krunali, Vice President #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“Growing up, both my dad and brothers were engineers. When I was around seven years old, I had a school project to make a fan. So I took a piece of plastic, I cut it, I drilled holes and I added nuts and screws. When I finished, I thought to myself, ‘This looks like a boy’s fan. It needs a girl’s touch.’ So I took two of my hairbands that had two red bunnies on them and added those to the fan for decoration. At school, my teacher said, ‘This is not the work of a girl! Who did this for you? Was it your dad or your brother?’ My teacher was a woman. She gave me an F. I was devastated, but I was too shy and quiet to say anything and to defend my work. I went home and told my dad, who said I needed to speak up so the teacher would know that I was capable of this work. My dad went with me to the school and told the teacher that there was no difference between boys and girls in his house. ‘She has an engineer’s brain,’ he said. I didn’t know what engineering was; I just saw my dad and brother always tinkering with things, and knew I could do the same. You may be in situations where someone discounts you or your ideas. I was then and still am an introvert. I don’t raise my voice, and I’m quiet. But there are times where you must speak up. And you have to do it right then, because someone else may not be around to do it for you. I learned a lesson from that project – I knew I was capable of doing the same things as my dad and brother, and I learned I needed to speak up for myself, and to have confidence in who I am.” – Krunali, Vice President #TIHumanElement #GeekWeek

“Innovation is about solving problems that make a difference. At TI, we get the chance to work on products that make the world safer, more efficient and more fun. We can channel our energy into the things that matter– and innovate in everything we do. We are creating value for the company and making an impact on the world, so that the people who come after us will be afforded the same great opportunities that we’ve been given.” –Ray, vice president of Connected Microcontrollers, and 2017 recipient of the University of Maryland’s Distinguished Alumni Award. Ray spearheaded TI’s partnership with UMD to build an interactive lab for future engineers. #TIHumanElement

“Many people think mentoring a robotics team requires you to be really good at building complex systems or programming. Mentoring is about so much more than the robot. It’s branding and marketing, costume and button designs and inspiring our community and the kids. It’s also about who will shape the future and learning how to work with others to accomplish what was once thought of as impossible. If robotics is not your thing, then I would encourage you to find something you enjoy and mentor on that. Today’s youth are waiting and willing to work with us to solve tomorrow’s problems. Let’s do what we can to give them a head start.” - Jason, Thin Film technician supervisor and mentor of FRC 6369 robotics team #TIHumanElement

"My passion is restoring analog and digital synthesizers from the 1970s and ‘80s. I am a musician, but I found I enjoyed repairing instruments even more than playing them. There is something beautiful and rewarding about taking something that is inoperable and making it play music again. These are pieces of art, and musicians are passionate about them. If they’re not repaired, they may end up in a dumpster, and then the musicians of tomorrow won’t be able to make music with them” – Steve, an employee in our applications rotation program #TIHumanElement

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