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#TellUsTigers: "At 2 a.m. on a warm June morning this past summer, I was in my office at Princeton learning a beautiful Ornette Coleman ballad called 'Sadness' in preparation for a show with The Bad Plus at the Montréal Jazz Festival. It was one of those moments alone with one's instrument where the world briefly makes sense and somehow exudes hope and integrity. Three years ago, I would have never imagined that I'd be here at #PrincetonU as director of the Program in Jazz Studies. Finding the balance between my performing/recording life and having the amazing opportunity to steer a jazz program has been a wild ride. It all made sense in those wee hours as I fully realized how lucky and empowered I am to inhabit both worlds. I started playing saxophone when I was 9 years old and was quickly seduced by jazz upon hearing Charlie Parker. I knew that this was what I wanted to do with my life but dared not tell anyone until push came to shove. Having Indian immigrant parents including a physics professor father, I knew that this negotiation would require a good bit of strategy. I managed to win them over. At Princeton, I am trying to put #jazz forth as a living art form. This music has a rich tradition that must be offered alongside its contemporary manifestations. On Saturday, Nov. 18, I will be directing Princeton University Jazz Small Groups in a concert celebrating the centenaries of #DizzyGillespie and #TheloniousMonk in Richardson Auditorium. We will perform their work but also showcase their influence through composers who have followed — including student compositions and arrangements. In continuing to investigate contemporary stories, my 16th album 'Agrima' came out a month ago with my Indo-Pak Coalition trio. I am concerned with examining what it means to be an American, especially in these crazy times. Jazz and improvisation have served as an ideal means to express the beauty of this confusion and self-realization while engaging global citizenry, ethnic identity and even national pride. We'll be performing @McCarterTheatre on March 16, 2018. My worlds continue to collide!" — Rudresh Mahanthappa (@rudreshkm); photo by Anna Berghuis '19 (@annabergs_)

#TellUsTigers: "I was born without my left hand, but have never considered myself disabled. When I was little, my parents gave me the motto 'I can do it.' I am grateful to have parents who encouraged me not to worry about my arm, because I had no qualms about wanting to study #ballet. I began training more seriously around the age of 12 at a small, close-knit studio in my hometown. A love of ballet is in my nature (I often call myself a 'ballet nerd'), but as I got older, the mentorship of others and gradually becoming a role model for new dancers only made me love ballet more. For me, the joy of dance lies in others: brightening an audience's day, teaching younger dancers, and laughing through hard work with fellow dancers make me value ballet's power to connect people. Dance was a major reason I wanted to attend #PrincetonU, and the opportunities to dance here challenge me to remember that 'I can do it.' The collegiate setting has allowed me to enjoy dance academically, and the Lewis Center for the Arts' (@PrincetonArts) Program in Dance provides so many opportunities I would not have access to elsewhere. As a member of the student-run @puballet, I've thought differently about performance and become more open to contemporary work. I volunteer with CityStep Princeton, teaching dance to kids in Trenton, where I work to find ways of showing others the joys of dance. At Princeton, I've even had the chance to use dance as a means of worship, which has challenged me spiritually as a Christian dancer. I'm often asked about the difficulties of having one hand, but really, it's made me more eager to do everything. For me, it's normal not to have a left hand; I don't consider the fact that I dance at all extraordinary. Dance is a way to show others what is possible in their lives, and it allows me to show others that they 'can do it,' too." — Sarah Betancourt (@_expelliarmus_ ), Class of 2020, photo by @noelvphoto, '82 *86 Princeton University Ballet auditions take place Tuesday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., New South Dance Studio #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I may never master the art of figure skating. But I can proudly say, that after 18 years, I have mastered the art of the fall. Falling is an integral part of figure skating. And it isn't fun. Plummeting from the air onto cold, unforgiving ice is painful. Figure skaters are known for being accessorized with purpley gray-green bruises. We've broken bones, twisted ankles & suffered concussions. Audiences love to watch us fall, love to watch us fail. Like them, there's a part of me that actually enjoys watching skaters fall. But not for the reason you'd expect. After years of falling, I've come to view it not as failure, but as the process. At age 3, I fell on my way from the boards to the blue line. At 5, I fell on a bunny hop. At 8, a flip. At 15, a double flip. Growing up I had a fall log, a diary of all my falls. Falls were categorized as 'good' or 'bad.' A 'good' fall was one that occurred on a new element, or one I was striving to improve. A 'bad' fall was one that happened on an element I'd had clean for months, or on a new jump I wimped out on mid-air. I once had a coach tell me that if I wasn't falling, I wasn't pushing myself hard enough. This is a lesson I take into my academic life at #PrincetonU. While I no longer write down my falls in a pink-glitter notebook, 'good' falls are an integral part of my life at Princeton. As an art and archaeology major (Program Two: Studio Arts), my time in the studio is dependent on my ability to push myself out of my comfort zone. This summer, as a recipient of funding from the Peter B. Lewis Summer Fund, I traveled to the Baltic region to trace my ancestral roots through portrait photography before attending the @PrincetonPIIRS Global Seminar in Moscow. I've continued to take photos & sketch in NYC, where I'm interning at @VeraWangGang. When I get back to campus in the fall, I intend to bring these portraits & the stories they tell to life through oil painting (@annaberghuis.art). It may sound counterintuitive, but falling on the ice gave me the confidence I needed to soar. And then, of course, fall." — Anna Berghuis (@annabergs_), Class of 2019; photo by @noelvphoto '82 *86 @princetonfigureskating

#TellUsTigers: "I have to cross Washington Road on my way to work — it's a busy street with lots of traffic — and I often think about what's going on in my brain. I'm a computational neuroscientist, so I study the brain and how it computes. Next time you're waiting to cross Washington (or any other road), think about the complex calculations your brain is carrying out: your retina gets a series of images of a speeding truck; your brain has to interpret those images, estimate how fast the truck is moving, how far away it is, how much time until it arrives, how much time it will take you to cross the road. (If it takes too long making these calculations, it will need to start over!) In my lab, we take data from the brains of animals engaged in similar tasks and seek to identify which neurons are computing the speed of the truck and which are deciding: 'Run — you can make it!' It's pretty well accepted (among neuroscientists at least) that the brain is some kind of computer — an information-processing device that takes information from the senses and computes appropriate responses. But there's massive disagreement about what kind of computer the brain is or how it computes. One of the exciting things about studying the #brain is how little we know, how much there is to discover! Before I got into neuroscience, I studied math and philosophy. I loved the beauty and precision of math, but I was fascinated by consciousness and the mind, the idea that pure matter could be organized to give rise to thoughts and feelings. Computational #neuroscience was a field where I could satisfy both kinds of yearnings. The people in my lab at #PrincetonU come from many backgrounds — engineering, statistics, math, biology, physics, computer science, neuroscience — all of which have different ideas and perspectives to contribute to thinking about how the brain works, which is one of the things that makes it exciting to work together." — Jonathan Pillow, associate professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; photo by Cindy Liu, Class of 2018 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "To me, women's empowerment means being unapologetic in your confidence & ability as a woman. I see this mentality on the @PrincetonAthletics women's track team — not only are all of these ladies incredible athletes, but they also find the time to be engineers, scientists, artists — everything! For this photo shoot, we wanted to embody this hardcore quality and show that we're not afraid to embrace our strength and intensity. The other day I was talking to a friend about traveling & he said, 'But you can't travel alone! You're a woman!' It's discouraging to know that because of my gender, I have to constantly worry about my safety in a way that men never will. As girls, we're taught from a young age that the world at large isn't a safe space for women — and not in a way that seeks to change this, but in a way that accepts it. But I refuse to be limited in what I can do, where I can go & who I can be because of my gender. That's why I think empowering women is so important. So that we can fight this rhetoric. I started running track when I was a freshman in high school. That year, I was the only girl who signed up to compete. I was pretty intimidated — I was a tiny freshman girl on a team of all guys. But the coach & my teammates treated me with nothing but respect, and I fell in love with running. Nothing really compares to flying down the track, feeling strong, powerful & determined. I run the 400, and it forces me to challenge myself on a level I hadn't thought possible. The mental toughness that the sport requires makes you realize that you are capable of so much. If I could write a letter to my younger self, I'd tell her to be bold in everything she does. Don't let others discourage you; make it your goal to prove them wrong. And never let anyone tell you that you can’t do something simply because you're a girl." — Quinn Parker (@quinnp6), Class of 2018 (4th from left), ecology and evolutionary biology major who is also earning a certificate in environmental studies, and the student-athlete wellness leader on the track team, which has a home meet Fri/Sat April 7&8 at Weaver Stadium #PrincetonU. Photo by @noelvphoto '82 *86 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "In a world that can't stop shouting, deep listening remains a radical act. Like many, I am disturbed by how divided this country seems to be. I wondered what the rhetoric of division obscured & if there was anything I could do about it. I figured the best way to start was by listening. This summer, with a grant from Davis Projects for Peace (@Pace_Princeton), my best friend/collaborator & I went to our hometown of Arroyo Grande, CA (“AG”) & listened to nearly 100 people from diverse identities & walks of life to develop a community-based theater project. The woman in this photo with me, a social worker/dog lover, was one of my favorites. (The joy of talking with her by the restless Pacific reminded me of awesome nights talking to my Peruvian host dad Fenacho under the thick stars of the Andes during my @BridgeYearProgram.) She & others opened up about their lives & what 'home' means to them. It turns out that, even across vast differences, the definition doesn’t change much: home is a place where you can be with people who make you feel comfortable, safe & loved. We all want to feel this way, almost desperately. But people's experiences of AG as home are vastly different depending on who they are, what they look like, where they come from. AG for the white rancher is not the same as for the Mexican immigrant. We started the nonprofit Rhizome Theater Company & compiled the interviews into a production with original live music. We invited people from the community to try to make them feel how their (differing) neighbors felt. #PrincetonU's Dean of the College Jill Dolan suggests we can glimpse utopia in the theater, rehearsing for a more communitarian future. Each night, watching as people in my hometown listened to & learned from each other — hearing the din of public conversation, reckoning with who we were & who we wanted to be — I felt for a moment what true peace may feel like: a peace like that of the Pacific, beautifully restless & humblingly vast. Indeed, one of the premises of our show was that peace is never done & requires constant reckoning, not tranquility or the absence of conflict." — Kyle Berlin '18, photo @Ash.Hatch #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "It is 15 years before Mandela becomes President, and South Africa, a country I left at 17, is still in the grip of apartheid. It is my 38th year. It is October, which the Afrikaners call die mooiste maand, the prettiest month, our spring. My mother calls with the news. My brother-in-law, a heart surgeon and protégé of Christiaan Barnard, the first doctor to transplant a human heart successfully, has managed to drive his car off a deserted, dry road and into a lamppost. Wearing his seat belt he has survived, but my sister was not so lucky. Her ankles and wrists, braced against the dashboard, were broken on impact. “She died instantly,” my mother assures me. I wonder how one knows such a thing and think of that moment of terror in the dark. I take a plane out to Johannesburg and go straight to the morgue. I am not sure why I feel I must do this. Perhaps I cannot believe my only sister, not yet 40 years old, the mother of six young children, is dead. Perhaps I believe the sight of her familiar face and body will make it clear. Or perhaps I just want to be beside her, to hold her one last time in my arms. I stand waiting with my hands on the glass, looking into the bright, bare, empty room with the sloping floor made of reddish stone, which dips slightly in the center to provide drainage from the dissection table. Then they wheel her body in. I cannot touch her, hold her, comfort her. I cannot ever heal her. Her whole body is wrapped in a white sheet, only her flower-face tilted up toward me: the broad forehead, the small, dimpled chin, the slanting eyes, the waxy skin. It is my face, our face, the face of our common ancestors. It is the heart-shaped face she would turn up to me obediently when, as children, we played the game of Doll. This moment is the beginning of endless years of yearning and regret. It is also the beginning of my writing life. Again and again, I will turn to the page to recapture this moment, my sister's life, and her spirit." — excerpt from "Once We Were Sisters" (@penguinrandomhouse), the new memoir by Sheila Kohler, lecturer in creative writing (@PrincetonArts); photo by @eganjimenez #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "Realizing my interests in arts and the environment could feed into and inform each other was a defining moment of my time at #PrincetonU. This intersection is at the heart of my forthcoming film "Confluence" (@confluencejourney), featuring new music (album available online Aug. 11). A confluence is where multiple rivers become one — an apt metaphor for the Colorado River Basin, the film's setting, where human stories and ecosystems come together to form a beautiful, threatened landscape. In Sept. 2016, the @nationalparkservice’s centennial, I set out with my indie folk band @theinfamousflapjackaffair (formed while I was earning a master's in environmental geography at @Oxford_uni) and the filmmakers of @npexperience to trace the Colorado River Basin from the @grandcanyonnps to the river's headwaters in @rockynps. That's me in the photo, second from right. We met people who call the Basin home and wove their words into original songs. We visited parks and played concerts but the people were the soul of the journey. Despite vastly different backgrounds — from Yampa Valley ranchers to a Navajo country musician — they were all intricately connected to and shaped by their places. One conversation particularly hit home — with Dianna Uqualla, a Havasupai medicine woman who met us at sunrise on the rim of the Grand Canyon. I was full of both wonder and the insecurities inherent in creativity and activism. Humans, Dianna said, have the power both to hurt and to heal. We must all ask ourselves "What tools do I bring to the table to help the healing?" I felt my doubts replaced by hope that music, a universal human practice, might be able to shift how we think about the environmental issues facing our generation. All people shape and are shaped by the places they inhabit. To be responsible in that relationship, we must ask hard questions: Can we learn to listen to each other and recognize our common ground, literal and metaphorical? Can conservation enable the freedom to self-define, instead of restricting it? Can we work together to tell a new story?" — Ben Barron (@BenNevis11) '13; photo by @danaromanoff #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "This picture was taken while my classmate — freshman Nguyen On, who goes by Cam — and I were practicing for our CHI 103 ["Intensive Elementary Chinese"] oral final presentation 15 minutes before class started. Most of our classmates gave a monologue or made a skit, but Cam came up with the idea to make characters out of sock puppets & I was immediately on board. The stress of finals & Princeton’s academic rigor can be a bit overwhelming at times, so being able to count playing with sock puppets as 'studying' was just what I needed. I also have fun with my food Instagram @mustmatcha. Cam generously sacrificed his socks to be made into puppets & we spent a couple hours the day before cutting cloth, drawing eyes & stapling together parts to create characters out of the socks. In our presentation, we had the puppets discuss a range of topics we'd learned in class, including Chinese traditions, choosing majors & my personal favorite, ordering classic Chinese dishes such as scallion pancakes & xiao long bao. What I like most about Chinese at #PrincetonU is that the professors teach it in a relatable, accessible way. For example, one of our sock puppets was an American-born Chinese kid who grew up going to Chinese school but not appreciating the language or culture until he left for college. Many students in CHI 103, myself included, felt this exact sentiment & signed up for the class to learn more about our Chinese heritage. I grew up in Southern California with Chinese parents who moved to the U.S. for graduate school. From ages 6 to 13, I uncooperatively attended Chinese school at a local high school every Saturday. My parents actively tried to raise me & my sisters in a Chinese household, speaking to us only in Mandarin, cooking classic Chinese dishes & only subscribing to Chinese TV channels. Cam was born in Vietnam & lived there until he was 8. He grew up speaking Cantonese & some Vietnamese, so transitioning to learning Mandarin was not as easy. Although I am studying #electricalengineering, I appreciate that Princeton gives students the opportunity to explore their interests in other departments." — Frances Ling (@fling97), Class of 2019

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#TellUsTigers: "At 2 a.m. on a warm June morning this past summer, I was in my office at Princeton learning a beautiful Ornette Coleman ballad called 'Sadness' in preparation for a show with The Bad Plus at the Montréal Jazz Festival. It was one of those moments alone with one's instrument where the world briefly makes sense and somehow exudes hope and integrity. Three years ago, I would have never imagined that I'd be here at #PrincetonU as director of the Program in Jazz Studies. Finding the balance between my performing/recording life and having the amazing opportunity to steer a jazz program has been a wild ride. It all made sense in those wee hours as I fully realized how lucky and empowered I am to inhabit both worlds. I started playing saxophone when I was 9 years old and was quickly seduced by jazz upon hearing Charlie Parker. I knew that this was what I wanted to do with my life but dared not tell anyone until push came to shove. Having Indian immigrant parents including a physics professor father, I knew that this negotiation would require a good bit of strategy. I managed to win them over. At Princeton, I am trying to put #jazz forth as a living art form. This music has a rich tradition that must be offered alongside its contemporary manifestations. On Saturday, Nov. 18, I will be directing Princeton University Jazz Small Groups in a concert celebrating the centenaries of #DizzyGillespie and #TheloniousMonk in Richardson Auditorium. We will perform their work but also showcase their influence through composers who have followed — including student compositions and arrangements. In continuing to investigate contemporary stories, my 16th album 'Agrima' came out a month ago with my Indo-Pak Coalition trio. I am concerned with examining what it means to be an American, especially in these crazy times. Jazz and improvisation have served as an ideal means to express the beauty of this confusion and self-realization while engaging global citizenry, ethnic identity and even national pride. We'll be performing @McCarterTheatre on March 16, 2018. My worlds continue to collide!" — Rudresh Mahanthappa (@rudreshkm); photo by Anna Berghuis '19 (@annabergs_)

#TellUsTigers: "I have made my office a safe place where students can share their frustrations and challenges as I help them to navigate their time at #PrincetonU. I've had students come to my office hours just to ask me how I, a Latina/Mexican American/Chicana who looks like them, became a professor. They often tell me how I am the first professor they’ve had who looks like them and understands where they came from. Even if I have a different background and reality from many of my students, my goal is to have that open door for all students who need me. I grew up in a multiethnic and multicultural middle class neighborhood in Sunnyvale, California. As children, my parents worked as migrant workers in agricultural fields, but both went on to graduate from college and graduate school. Even with their support, I still encountered roadblocks in my education. In fifth grade my teachers complained when I shared that I aspired to attend Stanford or an Ivy League University. They argued since I 'just wanted to teach' that I could go to a state school without putting so much pressure on myself. My parents defended my choice to excel and made sure I had every opportunity to attend the universities of my choice. Today I am a teacher. But not in any way those educators could have imagined. I am grateful that my parents pushed back against numerous other attempts to stifle my academic aspirations. As a professor, it is now I who defends and supports my students’ academic interests and passions. My research and teaching interests work to identify and explore the long history of underrepresented communities, especially those within the Latinx community. My first book, 'An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States' (April 2018, @uc_press), examines the politics of the Spanish language in the century following the U.S.-Mexican War. Congress created the first large group of Mexican American citizens at the close of the war in 1848 through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Spanish has ever since been a language of politics, business and social life in the United States." — Rosina Lozano, assistant professor of history; photo by @ChrisFascenelli #Princetagram

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#TellUsTigers: This week, enjoy an excerpt from "Cosmopolitan," from "A Life of Adventure and Delight," a new short story collection by Akhil Sharma '92. The story was originally part of his senior thesis for his certificate in creative writing. "A month and a half after they separated, Gopal still could not sleep at night if he thought there were two cars in Mrs. Shaw's driveway. Once, after a series of sleepless nights, he was up until three watching a dark shape behind Mrs. Shaw's station wagon. He waited by his bedroom window, paralyzed with fear and hope, for a car to pass in front of her house and strike the shape with its headlights. After a long time in which to car went by, Gopal decided to check for himself. He started across his lawn crouched over and running. The air was warm and smelled of jasmine, and Gopal was so tired he thought he might spill to the ground. After a few steps he stopped and straightened up. The sky was clear, and there were so many stars that Gopal felt as if he were in his village in India. The houses along the street were dark and drawn in on themselves. Even in India, he thought, late at night the houses look like sleeping faces. He remembered how surprised he had been by the pitched roofs of American houses when he had first come here, and how this had made him years to return to India, where he could sleep on the roof. He started across the lawn again. Gopal walked slowly, and he felt as if he were crossing a great distance. The station wagon stood battered and alone, smelling faintly of gasoline and the day’s heat. Gopal leaned against its hood. The station wagon was so old that the odometer had gone all the way around. Like me, he thought, and like Helen too. This is who we are, he thought — dusty, corroded, and dented from our voyages, with our unflagging hearts rattling on inside. We are made who we are by the dust and corrosion and dents and unflagging hearts. Why should we need anything else to fall in love? He wondered. We learn and change and get better. He leaned against the car for a minute or two. Fireflies hung flickering in the breeze. Then he walked home." #AkhilSharma #Princetagram @w.w.norton

#TellUsTigers: "I met Dana Fesjian '17 (on left) in the first few weeks of freshman year, when we both joined Princeton University Ballet and discovered we also had French class together. Through the combination of seeing each other every morning in class at 9 a.m. and spending many late nights in rehearsal together until 1 a.m., we quickly became very close friends. Our lifelong passion for dance eventually wove its way into our disparate academic majors. As an electrical engineering major, Dana had always had the dream of powering the world through dance. When it came time to select a topic for her senior thesis, she united her two passions of dance and engineering, constructing a device that converts kinetic energy from a dancer's movement to electrical energy using piezoelectricity. As a history major with a European cultural studies certificate, I chose to write about ballet within a political and historical framework in my senior thesis titled, 'From Nationalism to Neoclassicism: The Foundations of Ballet in Britain.' With the George Shultz '42 Fund award, I was able to do archival work at the @RoyalBalletSchool in London, researching the prominent cultural figures of 20th-century Britain. As part of my dance thesis I also produced an original ballet production of 'The Great Gatsby,' performed by members of @puballet. It was during a late night Gatsby rehearsal when Dana and I decided we wanted to plan a Euro Trip together. The iconic ruins and rich history of #Athens catered to my interest in ancient history and Dana's love of Greek mythology. And of course, we couldn't resist striking a ballet pose in front of one of mankind's most recognizable monuments, the #Acropolis! After graduation, Dana joined the publisher operations team at @YextInc, a digital knowledge tech company in New York, and I started working as a client success analyst at @Qualtrics, an experience management software company in Salt Lake City. Dana and I still keep in touch and visit each other every few months. The incredible experiences that we've shared together at #PrincetonU have cultivated a friendship that will last a lifetime." — Paige Shaw, Class of 2017 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I make it a habit, if ever there's a dog tagging along with a family on one of my Orange Key tours, to ask him or her especially what he or she (the dog) is interested in studying at college. It's not that high school juniors and dogs are easily confusable, much, it's more that I remember how trying the college application process could be, and I want everyone on my tours to laugh, and so relax and really take in what Princeton has to offer, instead of worrying about whether their last bout of SAT/ACT test taking was good enough. I have given about 130 tours since I joined in February of 2015, which is a rather long career for a college tour guide — like running backs, we tend to not have much longevity. What I love about being a tour guide is the ability to be a human contact point between the University and prospective students. I'm not a brochure, a clump of Gothic buildings, or a list of statistics and numbers, and so I have a very unique opportunity to make human the college experience for people who badly need it. We are humans: we need to humanize everything we come across. It's why I switched from a math major to ancient history (classics). Math is appealing in its rigor and abstraction, but history allows me to apply the same concepts to understanding people, cultures, societies, and civilizations — a type of wisdom I believe is badly needed today. And ancient history allows for a broader range of analysis when you factor in the ripple effect: mistakes and details and coincidences in the Roman Republic reverberate down to become major social movers in 21st century America. This desire to make the world more human — in spite of technologies, in spite of corporations, in spite of politicians — has become, through my last two years at Princeton, my defining ideology, which is exactly why when I was discussing the language requirement at #PrincetonU on a tour one day, and a dog barked as if asking me a question, I turned to it and said, sadly, 'No, I'm afraid it has to be one of OUR languages.'" — Aidan Gray, Class of 2018 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I've wanted to be an astronaut for about a decade. I'm not sure what prompted this dream — I remember a time when I intended to be a marine biologist when I grew up, then (after learning that the ocean harbored sharks) an archaeologist, and then, for whatever reason, 11-year-old me decided I'd be the first human to walk on Mars. I'm frequently asked why I want to go to space, and it's a difficult question for me to answer. It's like asking why I want to eat. For me, looking up at the night sky is literally breathtaking — I remember standing on a mountaintop in Oregon when I was about 13, seeing the Milky Way in all its shining glory for the first time, and feeling a physical pain in my chest that throbbed with wonder. When I try to rationally explain why I feel such a need to leave Earth, I usually get stuck at a belief that exploration is inherently important. The drive for knowledge, to figure out how the universe works, and to see it ourselves rather than through the mechanical eyes of rovers and satellites — I think this is both a uniquely human trait and one that defines us as human. Over time, my specific plans have shifted. This summer, I worked at @Virgin_Orbit (in this photo, I'm standing in front of the rocket that the company is building), and I learned that — if I'm truly, unselfishly dedicated to forwarding human exploration of space — my own life might be more usefully spent developing new kinds of rocket engines than personally traveling to #Mars. And at #PrincetonU and the other places I've lived, I'm finding more and more Earth things and people that I love and don't want to leave behind. But whatever path I end up taking, I can't imagine a night when I'll look up at the stars and not feel that longing in my chest, that forgetting-to-breathe pain calling me to go." — Isabel Cleff, Class of 2018, mechanical and aerospace engineering major; photo by Greg Robinson (@gregrphoto) #Princetagram

Wise words from Kyle Berlin '18! 📷: @princeton_university #TellUsTigers: "In a world that can't stop shouting, deep listening remains a radical act. Like many, I am disturbed by how divided this country seems to be. I wondered what the rhetoric of division obscured & if there was anything I could do about it. I figured the best way to start was by listening. This summer, with a grant from Davis Projects for Peace, my best friend/collaborator & I went to our hometown of Arroyo Grande, CA (“AG”) & listened to nearly 100 people from diverse identities & walks of life to develop a community-based theater project. The woman in this photo with me, a social worker/dog lover, was one of my favorites. (The joy of talking with her by the restless Pacific reminded me of awesome nights talking to my Peruvian host dad Fenacho under the thick stars of the Andes during my @BridgeYearProgram.) She & others opened up about their lives & what 'home' means to them. It turns out that the definition doesn’t change much: home is a place where you can be with people who make you feel comfortable, safe & loved. We all want to feel this way, almost desperately. But people's experiences of AG as home are vastly different depending on who they are, what they look like, where they come from. AG for the white rancher is not the same as for the Mexican immigrant. We started the nonprofit Rhizome Theater Company & compiled the interviews into a production with original live music. We invited people from the community to try to make them feel how their (differing) neighbors felt. #PrincetonU's Dean of the College Jill Dolan suggests we can glimpse utopia in the theater, rehearsing for a more communitarian future. Each night, watching as people in my hometown listened to & learned from each other — hearing the din of public conversation, reckoning with who we were & who we wanted to be — I felt for a moment what true peace may feel like: a peace like that of the Pacific, beautifully restless & humblingly vast. Indeed, one of the premises of our show was that peace is never done & requires constant reckoning, not tranquility or the absence of conflict." — Kyle , photo @Ash.Hatch #Princetagram

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#Repost @princeton_university
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#TellUsTigers: "I had no idea Freshman Week 1978 that Princeton & I would be intertwined years after graduation. I assumed my career that would take me to the pinnacles of my chosen profession: aerospace engineering. However, #dystonia, a rare debilitating neurological movement disorder, derailed my life in 2006. When the symptoms became acute, I retreated from life & was on the verge of skipping my 25th Reunion in 2007 even though we live so close. My wife Dawn ’85 persuaded me to go. Classmates saw my significant distress & sprang into action; through their connections, I saw experts @MassGeneral in Boston, hours after Reunions. My cherished classmates set me on course to get the best treatment that continues today & restored purpose to my life. After my 25th, I came out publicly with my diagnosis to the Princeton Alumni Weekly (@PAWPrinceton). That was the first step in my coping. The response from the alumni community really lifted me up. At our 35th Reunion this June, we celebrated the 10th year of my new life. Princeton is significant in my new life as a photographer & teacher. I started photographing sports at Old Nassau, then performances of student dance groups. Those activities led to @Dance.with.Art.Project, an Instagram campaign where I juxtapose dancers interacting with campus sculptures — as I am doing here with 'Upstart II' at the E-Quad. I just exhibited my project at #NYFW Style Fashion Week (@StyleFW). At #PrincetonU, I help teach Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPiCS) & the Freshman Seminar in Motorcycle Restoration. I see my former students at Reunions every year with ne'er another thought of missing one (I've attended 33 of 35). Princeton gave me my first life & rebuilt my second. My life truly revolves around Princeton & in giving back, I can continue to make a small difference in the lives I touch. September is #DystoniaAwarenessMonth & this survivor asks you to learn about this debilitating disease which makes recluses of its victims. Princeton gave me the courage & the wherewithal to not only battle this disease but to rise above it." — Noel Valero (@noelvphoto) '82 *86,

#TellUsTigers: "I had no idea Freshman Week 1978 that Princeton & I would be intertwined years after graduation. I assumed my career that would take me to the pinnacles of my chosen profession: aerospace engineering. However, #dystonia, a rare debilitating neurological movement disorder, derailed my life in 2006. When the symptoms became acute, I retreated from life & was on the verge of skipping my 25th Reunion in 2007 even though we live so close. My wife Dawn ’85 persuaded me to go. Classmates saw my significant distress & sprang into action; through their connections, I saw experts @MassGeneral in Boston, hours after Reunions. My cherished classmates set me on course to get the best treatment that continues today & restored purpose to my life. After my 25th, I came out publicly with my diagnosis to the Princeton Alumni Weekly (@PAWPrinceton). That was the first step in my coping. The response from the alumni community really lifted me up. At our 35th Reunion this June, we celebrated the 10th year of my new life. Princeton is significant in my new life as a photographer & teacher. I started photographing sports at Old Nassau, then performances of student dance groups. Those activities led to @Dance.with.Art.Project, an Instagram campaign where I juxtapose dancers interacting with campus sculptures — as I am doing here with 'Upstart II' at the E-Quad. I just exhibited my project at #NYFW Style Fashion Week (@StyleFW). At #PrincetonU, I help teach Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPiCS) & the Freshman Seminar in Motorcycle Restoration. I see my former students at Reunions every year with ne'er another thought of missing one (I've attended 33 of 35). Princeton gave me my first life & rebuilt my second. My life truly revolves around Princeton & in giving back, I can continue to make a small difference in the lives I touch. September is #DystoniaAwarenessMonth & this survivor asks you to learn about this debilitating disease which makes recluses of its victims. Princeton gave me the courage & the wherewithal to not only battle this disease but to rise above it." — Noel Valero (@noelvphoto) '82 *86, photo by @ChrisFascenelli #Princetagram #dystoniamovesme

Start a discussion on CollegeNET (link in bio) about your first day of college, your experience with service animals, or just your favorite pups on campus! Get votes from your peers and win scholarship money!
#scholarship
#scholarships #moneyforschool #winmoney #doge #dogsofinstagram #pupper #serviceanimal #servicedog #studygram #studentloans #studentlife #collegebound #collegelife #unilife
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@Regrann from @princeton_university - #TellUsTigers about your #firstdayofcollege: "Meet Koa (@koatheservicepup), a #comfortretriever...." #Princetagram #diabeticalertdogintraining #t1dwarrior #servicedogsofinstag

#TellUsTigers about your #firstdayofcollege: "Meet Koa (@koatheservicepup), a #comfortretriever. The seemingly effortless trust and communication that accompanies a working service dog team is truly beautiful. Next year, as part of my senior thesis research, I'll have a chance to observe this relationship by training Koa to be a #diabeticalertdog on campus. I will teach him how to alert to high and low blood glucose levels before placing him with a Type 1 diabetic. I will also teach an after-school program that teaches middle school students how to train service dogs; the kids will work with Koa. If you see Koa on campus with his service vest, please do not pet or distract. When I was little, I was terrified of dogs. That all changed when my grandma brought home Inukshuk, an 8-week-old #blacklab. Inukshuk is a cairn, or a trail marker, who has guided me on my path to discovering my passion for training service dogs. Working with a dog teaches me new lessons every day. I took a gap year before starting at #PrincetonU to raise a guide-dog-in-training, Derby. One of the most important things he taught me was to live in the moment. He mirrored my mood and if I was stressed about something, his less than adequate behavior was a constant reminder to focus on the work immediately in front of me. (This is a skill that has come in handy at Princeton.) When I dropped off Derby for the test that would determine whether he would continue his #guidedog training, I cried but a huge smile accompanied my tears. I was so proud of him. We had worked so hard for this moment. As part of my work with Derby and his trainer, we entered a busy mall. His trainer turned to me, handed me a blindfold and the leash. A cloud of darkness surrounded me as the fabric pressed against my face. I could hear the trickle of an indoor fountain and children playing down the hall. I felt the gentle tug of leather in my grasp, as I grabbed onto the harness handle. Disoriented, I turned to my dog, trusting Derby, just as he had turned to me so many times before. — Camden Olson, Class of 2019 #Princetagram #diabeticalertdogintraining #t1dwarrior #servicedogsofinstagram #servicedogintraining #collegedog

Sarah Betancourt '20 (@_expelliarmus_ ), a Pace Center volunteer with CityStep Princeton, a Student Volunteers Council service project, tells her story. Thanks for sharing @princeton_university!
#TellUsTigers: "I was born without my left hand, but have never considered myself disabled. When I was little, my parents gave me the motto 'I can do it.' I am grateful to have parents who encouraged me not to worry about my arm, because I had no qualms about wanting to study #ballet. I began training more seriously around the age of 12 at a small, close-knit studio in my hometown. A love of ballet is in my nature (I often call myself a 'ballet nerd'), but as I got older, the mentorship of others and gradually becoming a role model for new dancers only made me love ballet more. For me, the joy of dance lies in others: brightening an audience's day, teaching younger dancers, and laughing through hard work with fellow dancers make me value ballet's power to connect people. Dance was a major reason I wanted to attend #PrincetonU, and the opportunities to dance here challenge me to remember that 'I can do it.' The collegiate setting has allowed me to enjoy dance academically, and the Lewis Center for the Arts' (@PrincetonArts) Program in Dance provides so many opportunities I would not have access to elsewhere. As a member of the student-run @puballet, I've thought differently about performance and become more open to contemporary work. I volunteer with CityStep Princeton, teaching dance to kids in Trenton, where I work to find ways of showing others the joys of dance. At Princeton, I've even had the chance to use dance as a means of worship, which has challenged me spiritually as a Christian dancer. I'm often asked about the difficulties of having one hand, but really, it's made me more eager to do everything. For me, it's normal not to have a left hand; I don't consider the fact that I dance at all extraordinary. Dance is a way to show others what is possible in their lives, and it allows me to show others that they 'can do it,' too." — Sarah Betancourt, Class of 2020, photo by @noelvphoto, '82 *86
#PrincetonServes #dance #service #civicengagement

#Repost @princeton_university
@_expelliarmus_ of @puballet shot by @noelvphoto as part of his @dance.with.art.project ・・・
#TellUsTigers: "I was born without my left hand, but have never considered myself disabled. When I was little, my parents gave me the motto 'I can do it.' I am grateful to have parents who encouraged me not to worry about my arm, because I had no qualms about wanting to study #ballet. I began training more seriously around the age of 12 at a small, close-knit studio in my hometown. A love of ballet is in my nature (I often call myself a 'ballet nerd'), but as I got older, the mentorship of others and gradually becoming a role model for new dancers only made me love ballet more. For me, the joy of dance lies in others: brightening an audience's day, teaching younger dancers, and laughing through hard work with fellow dancers make me value ballet's power to connect people. Dance was a major reason I wanted to attend #PrincetonU, and the opportunities to dance here challenge me to remember that 'I can do it.' The collegiate setting has allowed me to enjoy dance academically, and the Lewis Center for the Arts' (@PrincetonArts) Program in Dance provides so many opportunities I would not have access to elsewhere. As a member of the student-run @puballet, I've thought differently about performance and become more open to contemporary work. I volunteer with CityStep Princeton, teaching dance to kids in Trenton, where I work to find ways of showing others the joys of dance. At Princeton, I've even had the chance to use dance as a means of worship, which has challenged me spiritually as a Christian dancer. I'm often asked about the difficulties of having one hand, but really, it's made me more eager to do everything. For me, it's normal not to have a left hand; I don't consider the fact that I dance at all extraordinary. Dance is a way to show others what is possible in their lives, and it allows me to show others that they 'can do it,' too." — Sarah Betancourt (@_expelliarmus_ ), Class of 2020, photo by @noelvphoto, '82 *86

I often shoot to inspire people and @_expelliarmus_ inspires me @dance.with.art.project .
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#Repost @princeton_university ・・・
#TellUsTigers: "I was born without my left hand, but have never considered myself disabled. When I was little, my parents gave me the motto 'I can do it.' I am grateful to have parents who encouraged me not to worry about my arm, because I had no qualms about wanting to study #ballet. I began training more seriously around the age of 12 at a small, close-knit studio in my hometown. A love of ballet is in my nature (I often call myself a 'ballet nerd'), but as I got older, the mentorship of others and gradually becoming a role model for new dancers only made me love ballet more. For me, the joy of dance lies in others: brightening an audience's day, teaching younger dancers, and laughing through hard work with fellow dancers make me value ballet's power to connect people. Dance was a major reason I wanted to attend #PrincetonU, and the opportunities to dance here challenge me to remember that 'I can do it.' The collegiate setting has allowed me to enjoy dance academically, and the Lewis Center for the Arts' (@PrincetonArts) Program in Dance provides so many opportunities I would not have access to elsewhere. As a member of the student-run @puballet, I've thought differently about performance and become more open to contemporary work. I volunteer with CityStep Princeton, teaching dance to kids in Trenton, where I work to find ways of showing others the joys of dance. At Princeton, I've even had the chance to use dance as a means of worship, which has challenged me spiritually as a Christian dancer. I'm often asked about the difficulties of having one hand, but really, it's made me more eager to do everything. For me, it's normal not to have a left hand; I don't consider the fact that I dance at all extraordinary. Dance is a way to show others what is possible in their lives, and it allows me to show others that they 'can do it,' too." — Sarah Betancourt (@_expelliarmus_ ), Class of 2020, photo by @noelvphoto, '82 *86 #Princetagram

absolutely love this interview from @princeton_university with @_expelliarmus_ ⬇️ #TellUsTigers: "I was born without my left hand, but have never considered myself disabled. When I was little, my parents gave me the motto 'I can do it.' I am grateful to have parents who encouraged me not to worry about my arm, because I had no qualms about wanting to study #ballet. I began training more seriously around the age of 12 at a small, close-knit studio in my hometown. A love of ballet is in my nature (I often call myself a 'ballet nerd'), but as I got older, the mentorship of others and gradually becoming a role model for new dancers only made me love ballet more. For me, the joy of dance lies in others: brightening an audience's day, teaching younger dancers, and laughing through hard work with fellow dancers make me value ballet's power to connect people. Dance was a major reason I wanted to attend #PrincetonU, and the opportunities to dance here challenge me to remember that 'I can do it.' The collegiate setting has allowed me to enjoy dance academically, and the Lewis Center for the Arts' (@PrincetonArts) Program in Dance provides so many opportunities I would not have access to elsewhere. As a member of the student-run @puballet, I've thought differently about performance and become more open to contemporary work. I volunteer with CityStep Princeton, teaching dance to kids in Trenton, where I work to find ways of showing others the joys of dance. At Princeton, I've even had the chance to use dance as a means of worship, which has challenged me spiritually as a Christian dancer. I'm often asked about the difficulties of having one hand, but really, it's made me more eager to do everything. For me, it's normal not to have a left hand; I don't consider the fact that I dance at all extraordinary. Dance is a way to show others what is possible in their lives, and it allows me to show others that they 'can do it,' too." — Sarah Betancourt (@_expelliarmus_ ), Class of 2020, photo by @noelvphoto, '82 *86 Princeton University Ballet auditions take place Tuesday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., New South Dance Studio #Princetagram

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