#tellustigers

MOST RECENT

#TellUsTigers: "Growing up in Queens, New York, my parents pushed me to pursue STEM, so I dedicated my time to hackathons & math team competitions. Many weekends, I’d go to the library to check out movies across all genres. At #PrincetonU, I planned to concentrate in computer science, having received the Bloomberg Technology Scholarship, a merit scholarship with full financial & job security. I also decided to explore my interest in film. After taking a class in visual arts in my first year, I broadened my creative horizons. I eventually saw that my passion was communicating through visual forms, not using code. STEM had unexpectedly prepared me to work with the practicalities of art production. From thinking about materiality to executing under specific conditions, I realized the process of artistic conception uses a similar methodical approach to how I’d solve math problems. I forfeited my scholarship. I felt naked. Having sacrificed my financial security, not knowing where my visual arts degree would lead, I felt ashamed that I let myself & my parents down. I constantly questioned my validity at Princeton, but I was determined to make the most out of this risk. Studying abroad my junior spring semester in Hong Kong, my cultural background, gave me time to reflect on my Princeton career & supported my personal growth. Last summer, I saw a documentary about the environmental & social consequences of fast fashion, where retailers make clothes cheaply to emulate high fashion. I was deeply affected — my own shopping habit was influenced by my parents, whose first success in the U.S. when they emigrated from Brazil & Hong Kong was opening a hosiery retail business. I’m raising awareness of fast fashion with my senior thesis: a fashion show May 1, 6:30 pm, in the Lewis Center Forum — I've repurposed & reconstructed clothes that I’ve bought from fast fashion retailers on clearance for around 90% off their original retail value — & a retail space thru May 5 in the Lucas Gallery, 185 Nassau St. I hope people connect to my work & are inspired to reflect on their motivations for consumption." — @Gabby.Chu '18, photo by @eganjimenez #Princetagram @PrincetonArts

#TellUsTigers: "According to stories passed down in my family, my great-grandfather worked as a traveling salesman in the Andes of Argentina in the 1920s. A Syrian-Jewish immigrant from Damascus, he rode a horse-drawn cart filled with textiles & other goods for thousands of miles, selling to rural communities along his route between Mendoza, Argentina, & southern Bolivia. Almost a century later, in July 2017, Princeton's Martin A. Dale ’53 Summer Award allowed me to retrace my great-grandfather’s trade route from start to finish. Here I am atop the El Sillar Mountain Pass near Tupiza, Bolivia, after nearly a month of traveling through low-lying valleys & breathtaking Andean highlands. Though I traveled largely by bus, & not by horse, I tried to recreate the experience my great-grandfather must have gone through, stopping in small towns & big cities, & staying with generous families along the way, whose ancestors may have done the same for my great-grandfather. I met folk singers & llama shepherds, & ate home-cooked Arabic meals like sfeeha, a meat patty made with herbs & spices fresh from the soil of the mountains. Little by little, I pieced together the story of a man whose journey for years had remained a legend in our family. As part of my junior year independent work in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, I’ve been writing a nonfiction story that chronicles the experience. It’s mainly a travelogue, with historical information & reflection scattered throughout. I like to think that it’s an important story to tell, because our family has been in transit for hundreds of years — from Spain, where they were expelled during the Inquisition, to Syria, Argentina & now the United States. The trade route through the Andes is just one part of that larger oral history, which only now is starting to be written down." — Jordan Salama '19 #Princetagram #PrincetonAbroad

Koa won a Grammy today! At Princeton social media day Princetagrammys awards, Koa’s #TellUsTigers Instagram post won the best #Princetagram! Huge thank you to Jamie Saxon for all her hard work with #TellUsTigers! #instafamous #whodoesntloveapuppy #princetonuniversity #pusocialday #servicedogintraining #diabeticalertdogintraining #t1d #t1dwarrior #t1dawareness #koameanswarrior

Repost from @princeton_university using @RepostRegramApp - #TellUsTigers: "I remember distinctly the first time I ever felt out of place at Princeton. It was at a diversity exercise during first-year orientation that had students stand up when they identified with a statement made by the facilitator. Out of 1,000 students, I was one of the less than 10 who stood up when the facilitator asked if there were any students whose parents had never attended high school. Both of my parents grew up in a neighborhood in the Dominican Republic where education often took a backseat to more formal employment. Although my dad dropped out of the seventh grade to support my grandmother financially, he never gave up on his belief that education was crucial for improving one’s circumstances. My parents moved us to New York City in hopes that my sister & I could one day pursue our own dreams without having financial pressures hold us back. Attending #PrincetonU has allowed me to realize my dreams, but the experience has not been without its uncomfortable moments. As a first-generation Latina student, I’ve often found myself feeling like I don’t belong on this campus. What has helped me the most through those moments is channeling my energy into making sure other students who share my similar background don’t feel the same way. I am a firm believer in the idea that representation matters. Seeing yourself & your experiences in someone else can go a long way in making you feel more at home. This belief is what prompted me to become a residential college advisor at Forbes. It is what motivated my friend Sam & me to bring Junot Díaz & Jorge Ramos to campus through Princeton Latinos y Amigos — Díaz is a #PulitzerPrize-winning Dominican Republic-born author & Ramos is the #1 anchorman for Noticiero Univision. It is why I take this moment to tell prospective #firstgen and/or students of color that they are deserving to be at institutions like Princeton. You may or may not encounter moments of discomfort while in college, but I encourage you to take solace in your deservingness to be here & the fact that there will be students like yourself who will make college feel like home." — Kauribel

#TellUsTigers: "I remember distinctly the first time I ever felt out of place at Princeton. It was at a diversity exercise during first-year orientation that had students stand up when they identified with a statement made by the facilitator. Out of 1,000 students, I was one of the less than 10 who stood up when the facilitator asked if there were any students whose parents had never attended high school. Both of my parents grew up in a neighborhood in the Dominican Republic where education often took a backseat to more formal employment. Although my dad dropped out of the seventh grade to support my grandmother financially, he never gave up on his belief that education was crucial for improving one’s circumstances. My parents moved us to New York City in hopes that my sister & I could one day pursue our own dreams without having financial pressures hold us back. Attending #PrincetonU has allowed me to realize my dreams, but the experience has not been without its uncomfortable moments. As a first-generation Latina student, I’ve often found myself feeling like I don’t belong on this campus. What has helped me the most through those moments is channeling my energy into making sure other students who share my similar background don’t feel the same way. I am a firm believer in the idea that representation matters. Seeing yourself & your experiences in someone else can go a long way in making you feel more at home. This belief is what prompted me to become a residential college advisor at Forbes. It is what motivated my friend Sam & me to bring Junot Díaz & Jorge Ramos to campus through Princeton Latinos y Amigos — Díaz is a #PulitzerPrize-winning Dominican Republic-born author & Ramos is the #1 anchorman for Noticiero Univision. It is why I take this moment to tell prospective #firstgen and/or students of color that they are deserving to be at institutions like Princeton. You may or may not encounter moments of discomfort while in college, but I encourage you to take solace in your deservingness to be here & the fact that there will be students like yourself who will make college feel like home." — Kauribel Javier '19 (@_kauribel); photo @eganjimenez #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers #ReduxEdition: We are reposting Antonio Torrence's August 2016 post in honor of his work arranging the upcoming New York City Gay Men's Chorus (@NYCGMC) concert at #PrincetonU April 14. In addition to Torrence, NYCGMC members include @PrincetonAlumni Sean Drohan '14, Hannibal Person '08, Paul Cernota '95, Michael Connelly '93 & David Witzel '87. Tickets: Call 609-258-9220. "As a pastor of a small Lutheran African American congregation, I was already prepared on Sunday, June 12, 2016, to reflect on the events that took place one year previously at #EmanuelAMEChurch in Charleston, SC, where nine parishioners were killed. However, as an openly gay pastor, my heart & the hearts of my congregation were even more heavily laden upon hearing news of the #OrlandoPulse night club massacre in the early hours of the morning of June 12. So, upon receiving notification from the artistic director of NYCGMC — in which I sing tenor — that @GoodMorningAmerica wanted us to honor the victims that next morning, it felt 'important' to stand in solidarity with my fellow chorines & the LGBT community. We arrived at 5:45 a.m. & focused our high emotions on the song we were to perform: "Night" from the musical 'Next to Normal.' For me the lyrics 'The price of love is loss, but still we pay/We love anyway' struck home. After sound checks & lighting clues, we stood at 8:50 a.m. at the crossroads of the world in Times Square & sung of the need for light. For 3 minutes, the rush hour crowd stopped, gathered around & listened. Tour buses pulled over, taxis slowed down & car-honking stopped, as tears flowed from the eyes of the TV crew, newscasters & even uniformed police officers. For those 3 minutes, Times Square become a light post of hope, resilience & purpose as NYCGMC exposed their hearts to humanity. This wasn’t just a performance; it was the coming together of a community. As the co-chair of the Diversity Working Group within University Services at Princeton I’ve broadened my awareness of issues of inclusion & equity. Music is one of many vehicles whereby I get to promote awareness & advocate change." — Antonio Torrence, business manager, University Services #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: During my childhood, my grandmother from Peru helped my parents raise me and my brother (Michael Asparrin ‘19). Without her, we wouldn’t be the people we are today. I grew up very much aware of my culture and background which included a familiarity with Peruvian food and listening to traditional music at family gatherings. I always felt proud of my #Inca heritage. When I saw ‘Inca Art & Architecture’ in the course offerings, I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn more about the wonders of the Incas so I applied, not expecting to get in as a first-year student, but hoped for the best. As one of the components of the course, we travel to Peru; visiting Cusco, Machu Picchu, and Lima. This is my first trip to Peru, allowing me to experience things that up to this point I have learned about both in my childhood and in this class. A highlight has been visiting Ollantaytambo in Cusco. It was surreal seeing the magnitude of the Incan work, and when we climbed to the top it was like nothing I have seen before. To be there and think about the Incas being in the same places was an indescribable feeling. During the second half of the trip, my grandmother will be joining us as we explore some cultural sites in and around Lima. I haven’t seen her in about four years now, so we’re very excited about being able to reunite here in Peru. This trip has really reminded me to stop and smell the roses. There’s so much more to this life than we realize.” — Carmella Asparrin ‘21 (@casparrin) 📸: Curtis Leonard ‘20 (@curtisleonard46) #PrincetonAbroad #SpringBreak

#TellUsTigers: "I work and live by the motto 'everything you need is within you.' This mindset was one of the first things my grandmother taught me. I remember the green mountains in the #DominicanRepublic and how, at an early age, she helped me navigate life without a map. She never learned how to read or write, but could reach the most difficult destinations by utilizing her self-assurance and intuition. We visited the farthest places one could imagine. She would use people’s houses as checkpoints. The value of the connections that I made on these trips was foundational in how I came to be, how I navigate life and why am I here. It has shaped the way I realize the wholeness of my inner world: everything I need is truly within me. The realization that our society prescribes narrow definitions of what constitutes wellness motivated me to espouse a value of radical self-care. Radical in the sense of holding a supportive space in which students can decide for themselves what wellness means to them in the context of their cultural upbringing, life experiences and personal need. At the end of the day, it is up to us to reach higher and to be that light we expect others to be. I am also passionate about how one comes to value knowledge that is 'worth' pursuing, which sparked my pursuit of a master's degree in organizational psychology and doctorate in adult learning and leadership from @Columbia. I use the lens of learning strategies to capture the sequence of experiences that intertwine in and out of classroom: magical 'aha' moments that come from connections with students, lively conversations about living and learning, the painful breakup, the frustrating quest of a failed social connection or the guilt resulting from unmet expectations. I appreciate every life that has come my way: student, faculty, parent, colleague, friend, neighbor and family member. Each interaction has served as my own checkpoint, showing me how I am navigating this journey called life just fine, imperfectly fine." — Darleny Cepin, director of student life, Mathey College, one of Princeton's six residential colleges; photo by @eganjimenez #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I grew up in East Orange, NJ, a town I describe as hardscrabble, consisting primarily of African American working–class & low-income folk trying to live their best lives. My father worked as chemical operator in Newark, NJ, and my mother shuttled between working as a cashier or bank teller & stay-at-home mom. Education was messaged as power in our household. Even as my mother suffered through breast cancer and passed at age 33 during my 8th grade year, my parents encouraged me to pursue the best educational opportunities available. Thanks to a generous scholarship, I attended @DelbartonSchool, which was only 25 miles away but felt like another world. By graduation, I was the only African American in the class & one of three in the school. Most students lived in homes with their own bedroom while I lived in a one-bedroom apartment, where my father & I slept in the living room & my sister slept in the bedroom. Everyone seemed to expect they would attend @NotreDame, @GeorgetownUniversity or colleges I had only heard of during college basketball seasons. Thankfully I had a great counselor with high expectations about my college options. I spent the summer between my junior & senior year at the NJ Scholars Program at @LvilleSchool, where I had my first in-depth conversations about college options with peers. I cherish #PrincetonU faculty, administrators and kitchen & custodial staff who showed that they cared about me living my full potential. We shy from using the word, but LOVE was present in their care & guidance. I witness the commitment of my colleagues to make Princeton accessible to students who traditionally are not be expected to be undergraduates based on socioeconomic background or underrepresented identities. Access is a nice buzzword, but programs like Princeton University Preparatory Program, Princeton Summer Journalism Program, Freshman Scholars Institute & Scholars Institute Fellows Program institutionalize the guidance I received by happenstance. These programs empower students to see Princeton as a space in which they belong & own." — Kevin Hudson '97, asst. dir. for college opportunity 📸: @chris_fascenelli #firstgen #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I was incredibly lucky to grow up in a household filled with music. My mom, Nirmala Rajasekar, a professional Carnatic (South Indian classical) musician, is my guru and has been the most important musical influence in my life. Also, my dad taught me all the Bollywood tunes of yesteryear and my brother is responsible for much of my knowledge of popular Western idioms! This video, also featuring Paige Kunkle ’18, Maddy Kushan ’20, Meredith Hooper ’20 & Ro van Wingerden ’20, is an excerpt from my composition 'Devotee'; my inspiration to create a piece with a spiritually unified message was Rheinberger's 'Abendlied,' a setting of a biblical text; the simple vulnerability of these Christian words reminded me of the sentiment in several Hindu verses. I began to wonder how texts from each faith could interact in a musical setting. The process of writing this piece made me a better 'devotee': a greater believer in the power of music to bring us together. For my senior thesis, I have composed a piece called "Gaanam,' the Sanskrit word for singing — it is dedicated to Gabriel Crouch & @PrincetonGleeClub. They are performing it on Saturday, March 3, in Richardson Auditorium. Many of the melodic and rhythm ideas are derived from Carnatic music — parts of it may sound different to an audience accustomed to Western music, but I hope it will still have the power to touch them! Composing gives me the opportunity to deeply explore these two glorious idioms in my background. When I'm composing I feel my most natural self. I've had some magical experiences at #PrincetonU. I had my first taste of live opera in Vienna with a @PrincetonPIIRS Global Seminar; that summer I decided to pursue music. I'll never forget the 1st concert of the Glee Club's South Africa tour in Soweto — everyone was crying from the joy of an absolute connection between the audience & the performers. I value the daily moments most — with Swara, a student group dedicated to promoting Indian classical music; late-night sight-reading sessions with Glee buds. I have been so blessed to have had this rich musical culture at Princeton & I will treasure it forever." — Shruthi Rajasekar '18 #Princetagram

Repost from @princeton_university @TopRankRepost #TopRankRepost #TellUsTigers: "I've always had a sticky mind. Preparing for a quiz show like Jeopardy is something that happens through years of curiosity, as your mind learns & retains facts, languages & experiences. As a kid in Milwaukee & later at @Harvard, I enjoyed competing in academic tournaments, but an opportunity to appear on @Jeopardy was always the ultimate dream. That dream took a back seat during my years as a Woodrow Wilson School grad student, as a humanitarian relief worker based in DC & as a @PeaceCorps director in Africa. Those international adventures calmed for a season when I returned to the States & began working at #PrincetonU. The dream reemerged & the unlikely became a reality! One 50-question online test at home led to an in-person tryout in New York City. A few months later I received an invitation to be a contestant. I had a month to prepare, and although I crammed in as much geography, art, literature, history, music & Academy Award winners as I could, the best preparation is still your entire life experience. I arrived at the @SonyPictures Studios with 10 other contestants, ready for a week's worth of episodes to be taped in one day. We braved a whirlwind of makeup, rules briefings, paperwork & practice rounds before three of us at a time were chosen to compete. Eventually it was my turn. Everything became very focused once the lights dimmed, the theme music started & host Alex Trebek walked onto the stage. This dream, having come true, went far better than I could have ever imagined, as I won $86,201 over 6 episodes. The questions covered all kinds of topics, but as a Princetonian, I'm glad not to have missed anything about the University & the town of Princeton: tigers, Einstein, hoagies, or the only US President with a PhD. Once the broadcast date arrived, the Wilson School organized nightly viewings on campus with big turnouts; I'm grateful to Betteanne & Michael who arranged food & door prizes. It's been an incredible experience. The whole thing still feels surreal, but shouldn't you expect that from a dream?" - Gilbert Collins, dir. of global health programs, assoc. dir. of the

Repost from @princeton_university using @RepostRegramApp - #TellUsTigers: "I've always had a sticky mind. Preparing for a quiz show like Jeopardy is something that happens through years of curiosity, as your mind learns & retains facts, languages & experiences. As a kid in Milwaukee & later at @Harvard, I enjoyed competing in academic tournaments, but an opportunity to appear on @Jeopardy was always the ultimate dream. That dream took a back seat during my years as a Woodrow Wilson School grad student, as a humanitarian relief worker based in DC & as a @PeaceCorps director in Africa. Those international adventures calmed for a season when I returned to the States & began working at #PrincetonU. The dream reemerged & the unlikely became a reality! One 50-question online test at home led to an in-person tryout in New York City. A few months later I received an invitation to be a contestant. I had a month to prepare, and although I crammed in as much geography, art, literature, history, music & Academy Award winners as I could, the best preparation is still your entire life experience. I arrived at the @SonyPictures Studios with 10 other contestants, ready for a week's worth of episodes to be taped in one day. We braved a whirlwind of makeup, rules briefings, paperwork & practice rounds before three of us at a time were chosen to compete. Eventually it was my turn. Everything became very focused once the lights dimmed, the theme music started & host Alex Trebek walked onto the stage. This dream, having come true, went far better than I could have ever imagined, as I won $86,201 over 6 episodes. The questions covered all kinds of topics, but as a Princetonian, I'm glad not to have missed anything about the University & the town of Princeton: tigers, Einstein, hoagies, or the only US President with a PhD. Once the broadcast date arrived, the Wilson School organized nightly viewings on campus with big turnouts; I'm grateful to Betteanne & Michael who arranged food & door prizes. It's been an incredible experience. The whole thing still feels surreal, but shouldn't you expect that from a dream?" - Gilbert Collins, dir. of global health programs, assoc. dir. of the

#TellUsTigers: "I've always had a sticky mind. Preparing for a quiz show like Jeopardy is something that happens through years of curiosity, as your mind learns & retains facts, languages & experiences. As a kid in Milwaukee & later at @Harvard, I enjoyed competing in academic tournaments, but an opportunity to appear on @Jeopardy was always the ultimate dream. That dream took a back seat during my years as a Woodrow Wilson School grad student, as a humanitarian relief worker based in DC & as a @PeaceCorps director in Africa. Those international adventures calmed for a season when I returned to the States & began working at #PrincetonU. The dream reemerged & the unlikely became a reality! One 50-question online test at home led to an in-person tryout in New York City. A few months later I received an invitation to be a contestant. I had a month to prepare, and although I crammed in as much geography, art, literature, history, music & Academy Award winners as I could, the best preparation is still your entire life experience. I arrived at the @SonyPictures Studios with 10 other contestants, ready for a week's worth of episodes to be taped in one day. We braved a whirlwind of makeup, rules briefings, paperwork & practice rounds before three of us at a time were chosen to compete. Eventually it was my turn. Everything became very focused once the lights dimmed, the theme music started & host Alex Trebek walked onto the stage. This dream, having come true, went far better than I could have ever imagined, as I won $86,201 over 6 episodes. The questions covered all kinds of topics, but as a Princetonian, I'm glad not to have missed anything about the University & the town of Princeton: tigers, Einstein, hoagies, or the only US President with a PhD. Once the broadcast date arrived, the Wilson School organized nightly viewings on campus with big turnouts; I'm grateful to Betteanne & Michael who arranged food & door prizes. It's been an incredible experience. The whole thing still feels surreal, but shouldn't you expect that from a dream?" - Gilbert Collins, dir. of global health programs, assoc. dir. of the Center of Health and Wellbeing @Wilson_School #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "One day during my first year, I got the worst call I have ever received. Princeton, papers and everything else paled in comparison. I lost a friend. Even today, I think about where my friend would be: the day she would have returned from her semester abroad, the day she would have graduated and started the next chapter of her life. Losing her shattered my perception of what struggling with mental health looks like. I thought a struggle was something you could see, but I learned it could be hidden behind a smile, a big laugh and awesome combat boots. The production of the musical "Next to Normal" at the Lewis Center for the Arts is dedicated to her and friends we have lost during our time at Princeton. @KatieFrorer '18 (right) & I perform in the show & @magz.stankowska '18 (center) is the stage manager. "Next to Normal" chronicles the ripples that a struggle with mental illness sends through a family. The show deals with not only bipolar disorder but also high expectations, caretaking and what love can look like. Katie, Magda and I are drawn to the show for distinct reasons yet united in our belief that its themes make it important to perform now. We believe it can open the doors to the conversation the #PrincetonU community needs to have. In conjunction with Mental Health Week at Princeton, performances take place Feb. 16, 19 & 20. After the Feb. 19 performance, Sabine Kastner, prof. of psychology & the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, will lead a talkback. I want to share with everyone — incoming and current students, faculty, staff, community members — that, truly, everyone is struggling. This does not preclude you from being happy. In fact, realizing this may actually make you happier. Accept that you will make mistakes and recognize that your best is good enough. Self-care may not have a deadline or a grade but must be a priority. I will leave Princeton with a degree, network and plans to attend law school, but this will always be the most valuable lesson Princeton has taught me." — Kat Giordano '18 (@kattycake13); 📸: Justin Goldberg @PrincetonArts #Princetagram For mental health concerns, call University Health Services at 609-258-3141.

#Repost @princeton_university ・・・
#TellUsTigers: “I started to fall in love with basketball as soon as I could walk. Having an older brother who played and a dad [Craig Robinson '83] who played and coached, it was in my DNA. With my dad being a coach, we moved around the country a lot as he worked for different teams. With that, I played a lot of basketball with a lot of different people. It was hard at first, but once kids find common ground, it is pretty easy to make friends and share the sport we all loved to play. I chose Princeton because of the family feel I got every time I came to campus or talked to the coaches here. The women's basketball team (@princetonwbb) all made me feel as though I was a part of the team even when I was a junior in high school. At first, I was worried about the pressures of following in the footsteps of my dad (who works for the @nyknicks) and my aunt (@michelleobama '85). But I quickly realized that I would have a completely different experience & be able to make my own memories. With that being said, it is a great feeling to wear the same jersey number 45 as my dad when he played for #PrincetonU & to be able to have that connection on & off the court. A lot of people say that I mirror the way he plays & that means a lot, especially because he was so good! One piece of advice my dad gave me before starting college was to not worry about grades & to continue to put my all into both my basketball & my schoolwork. He reassured me that no matter the outcome, if I put my all into it, he would always be proud of me. That has been the biggest trait that I take with me off the court & apply to life outside of #basketball. As long as I am putting forth my 100% effort, I try not to focus on the grades I get & instead continue to learn from my experiences & put my best foot forward. If I had one takeaway from my time at Princeton it would be, to allow yourself to be the most authentic version in all that you do & to not let yourself think you are not good enough.” — Leslie Robinson (@les_ismore45) ’18; 📸: @sof.singer #princetagram @princetonathletics Watch women’s basketball play Harvard (@harvwbb) at 6:30 p.m. Feb 9

#TellUsTigers: “I started to fall in love with basketball as soon as I could walk. Having an older brother who played and a dad [Craig Robinson '83] who played and coached, it was in my DNA. With my dad being a coach, we moved around the country a lot as he worked for different teams. With that, I played a lot of basketball with a lot of different people. It was hard at first, but once kids find common ground, it is pretty easy to make friends and share the sport we all loved to play. I chose Princeton because of the family feel I got every time I came to campus or talked to the coaches here. The women's basketball team (@princetonwbb) all made me feel as though I was a part of the team even when I was a junior in high school. At first, I was worried about the pressures of following in the footsteps of my dad (who works for the @nyknicks) and my aunt (@michelleobama '85). But I quickly realized that I would have a completely different experience & be able to make my own memories. With that being said, it is a great feeling to wear the same jersey number 45 as my dad when he played for #PrincetonU & to be able to have that connection on & off the court. A lot of people say that I mirror the way he plays & that means a lot, especially because he was so good! One piece of advice my dad gave me before starting college was to not worry about grades & to continue to put my all into both my basketball & my schoolwork. He reassured me that no matter the outcome, if I put my all into it, he would always be proud of me. That has been the biggest trait that I take with me off the court & apply to life outside of #basketball. As long as I am putting forth my 100% effort, I try not to focus on the grades I get & instead continue to learn from my experiences & put my best foot forward. If I had one takeaway from my time at Princeton it would be, to allow yourself to be the most authentic version in all that you do & to not let yourself think you are not good enough.” — Leslie Robinson (@les_ismore45) ’18; 📸: @sof.singer #princetagram @princetonathletics Watch women’s basketball play Harvard (@harvwbb) at 6:30 p.m. Feb 9 & @DartmouthCollege at 5 p.m. Feb. 10 Jadwin Gym.

#TellUsTigers: "When I was accepted to Princeton, some of my high school classmates believed that it was only because I was 'poor & Mexican,' not because I deserved it. 'Poor & Mexican' are two adjectives that have defined me & my family for a long time. Growing up in the rural town of Newman, California, I was surrounded by farms, orchards & a strong family that supported me. However, my education was very limited: lack of funding in my public school, poor quality of teaching, miles of separation from a university & missing enrichment opportunities. My parents, who came from Michoacán, Mexico, understood the value of education in this country. They taught me to recognize my privilege as a US citizen & take advantage of all the opportunities, especially when limited or competitive. I always had a passion for biology but I did not associate 'poor & Mexican' with professional careers. I interned at the Stanford Institutes of Medicine Summer Research in 2014, which introduced me to scientists & oriented me towards a career in disease research. I applied to the Ivy League because I wanted access to the resources the best scientists have. What I did not expect was how challenging it would be here. My first two years were a mess of anxiety, self-deprecation, doubt & depression. I started believing those who said I was only admitted for diversity & felt out of place. However, I sought help from Princeton’s resources: counseling, professors' office hours, tutoring. I worked as a research assistant in infectious disease ecology. I learned that people in the academic community believe in me so I became confident in my abilities. As I finish the first semester of my third year at #PrincetonU, I realize that I am exactly where I want to be. I am proud to be 'Mexican & poor' but I will also be defined by words like 'academic,' 'scientist' & 'Princeton.' My advice to other students who come from disadvantaged backgrounds is to take advantage of all the opportunities & resources you have & ask for help if you can’t find them because you really are worth more than the labels & stereotypes put against you." — Daniel José Navarrete '19; 📸: Cindy Liu '18 #firstgen #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I was sure I was going to be a doctor when I was young. My four siblings wanted to be doctors too. My father is an internist and we would visit his office nearly every week. Now every time I'm back home, my father still tells me to be a doctor. However, in high school after taking my first programming class, I was set on engineering and building real systems. I can remember proudly showing my mother stick drawings that I made from one of my first programs in BASIC. It fills me with a sense of wonder and pride to create something seemingly out of nothing. When I arrived at Princeton and saw the magical creations in the class known as Car Lab, I was set on becoming an electrical engineer. I was set on seeing my own creation drive around. I was set on proudly proclaiming that 'I made that' and point to my car. I remember that freshman year was a very hectic time. I was overwhelmed and confused. There are just so many things that you are bombarded with at once: classes, summer internships, extracurriculars. I had no idea what major to pursue or even which classes to pick. I had no idea how to take advantage of all the opportunities offered at #PrincetonU. I wished I had a mentor I could turn to. Now, as co-president of Princeton's National Society of Black Engineers (@nsbe), I've had the opportunity to reach out to younger students so they don't feel the same way I did. Our group established a mentorship program as a support system for first-year students and sophomores. We host events to give juniors and seniors advice about graduate school. We truly set out to create a community for Princeton's black engineers. I mentored a first-year student and helped him explore electrical engineering as a major and figure out which classes to take. It was so rewarding to help him avoid the feelings and confusion I experienced my first year. As astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson says, science, engineering and math 'are the engines' of problem solving for the 21st century. Everyone, regardless of race, should be able to participate full-heartedly in these fields with a community of support around them." — Hans Hanley '18 @eprinceton #Princetagram

So happy to share this conversation with my inspiring friend Francie Jain, founder of Nxt Chptr - Career Change Made Easy. @nxt_chptr is a community and virtual career coach created for women exploring career change. I got to dish with Francie about building Umami Girl, transitioning from corporate lawyer to entrepreneur, being "expert enough" and lots more. Link to the full interview in profile. 💪💁‍♀️ -
"How to Start a Media Business with Kohlrabi & Marmite"

Conversation with Carolyn Cope, Founder & Publisher of Umami Girl

1. What is your business?

I’m the founder and publisher of Umami Girl, a multimedia company centered around our women’s lifestyle website. We focus on family, food, home & adventure, and we seek to inspire and inform women who want to make every day a little special. In 2008, I created Umami Girl as a food blog and a resource for people who were looking for mostly healthy, mostly vegetarian recipes. Over the years, the site grew to cover a wider range of topics, and since mid-2017 we’ve been in an exciting period of expansion and rebranding that will culminate in some big developments in the second quarter of 2018.

#MomProfile – “How to Start a Media Business with Kohlrabi & Marmite”
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Conversation with Carolyn Cope, Founder & Publisher of Umami Girl
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1. What is your business?
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I’m the founder and publisher of Umami Girl, a multimedia company centered around our women’s lifestyle website. We focus on family, food, home & adventure, and we seek to inspire and inform women who want to make every day a little special. In 2008, I created Umami Girl as a food blog and a resource for people who were looking for mostly healthy, mostly vegetarian recipes. Over the years, the site grew to cover a wider range of topics, and since mid-2017 we’ve been in an exciting period of expansion and rebranding that will culminate in some big developments in the second quarter of 2018.
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Umami Girl makes money three main ways. We have sponsored content where a brand pays Umami Girl to create a recipe using an ingredient, or to review or promote a product. You can see an example of this in my post for Watercress Pesto Pizza. The sponsor was B&W Growers, a specialty leaf farm.
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The second source of revenue is good old-fashioned banner advertising. We work with an agency called MediaVine that was started by bloggers for bloggers, and they sell advertising space by aggregating blogs. The third source of revenue is affiliate marketing. We link to products on Amazon and also through rewardStyle.
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If we link to an Amazon product from a blog post and a reader clicks through, Amazon will pay Umami Girl a small percentage of sales made to that person for 24 hours. For example, my vegetarian gravy recipe is made with a touch of Marmite, a spread primarily sold in England. Many Americans aren’t able to find Marmite in their local grocery stores, so a link to Amazon.com can be helpful. RewardStyle also pays a small percentage to affiliates, but it’s more of an agency, and it represents retail companies like West Elm or Etsy. These brands are becoming more relevant to Umami Girl as we increase our focus on interior design.
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Link to full interview in profile!

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