#tellustigers

199 posts

TOP POSTS

#TellUsTigers: "To me, women's empowerment means being unapologetic in your confidence & ability as a woman. I see this mentality on the @PrincetonAthletics women's track team — not only are all of these ladies incredible athletes, but they also find the time to be engineers, scientists, artists — everything! For this photo shoot, we wanted to embody this hardcore quality and show that we're not afraid to embrace our strength and intensity. The other day I was talking to a friend about traveling & he said, 'But you can't travel alone! You're a woman!' It's discouraging to know that because of my gender, I have to constantly worry about my safety in a way that men never will. As girls, we're taught from a young age that the world at large isn't a safe space for women — and not in a way that seeks to change this, but in a way that accepts it. But I refuse to be limited in what I can do, where I can go & who I can be because of my gender. That's why I think empowering women is so important. So that we can fight this rhetoric. I started running track when I was a freshman in high school. That year, I was the only girl who signed up to compete. I was pretty intimidated — I was a tiny freshman girl on a team of all guys. But the coach & my teammates treated me with nothing but respect, and I fell in love with running. Nothing really compares to flying down the track, feeling strong, powerful & determined. I run the 400, and it forces me to challenge myself on a level I hadn't thought possible. The mental toughness that the sport requires makes you realize that you are capable of so much. If I could write a letter to my younger self, I'd tell her to be bold in everything she does. Don't let others discourage you; make it your goal to prove them wrong. And never let anyone tell you that you can’t do something simply because you're a girl." — Quinn Parker (@quinnp6), Class of 2018 (4th from left), ecology and evolutionary biology major who is also earning a certificate in environmental studies, and the student-athlete wellness leader on the track team, which has a home meet Fri/Sat April 7&8 at Weaver Stadium #PrincetonU. Photo by @noelvphoto '82 *86 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "When I was a student at Princeton, I was often struck with amazement as I would walk through campus. I knew I was a part of something bigger than myself. I would often say to fellow classmates 'pinch me if I ever get jaded and take this place for granted.' I now say the same thing to my castmates in '@Aladdin' — in which I am making my #Broadwaydebut as Prince Abdullah and a member of the ensemble — at the historic New Amsterdam Theater. On #Broadway, people take directions seriously, so instead of the typical 'break a leg,' I find myself getting pinches from various people throughout the show. Ask anyone in the industry and they will tell you that each person's artistic journey is unique. I've always had a hard time doing just one thing at a time. One of the most formative decisions in my life came at the end of my sophomore year at #PrincetonU. I was running track on the @PrincetonAthletics varsity team, singing in the a cappella group @ptnfootnotes, dancing in @disiacdance and performing in plays and musicals with Princeton University Players and at the Lewis Center for the Arts (@PrincetonArts). I was spread too thin and I came to the realization that, for once, I had to focus. When I returned to campus for my junior year, I dropped track and jumped full throttle into the arts, taking advantage of every opportunity I had to develop my craft. Princeton fostered an environment where I felt safe to take risks as an artist. I don't think anyone can be fully prepared for a life in the arts, however I feel my time at Princeton conditioned a tenacity within me to fight for my vision and make it a reality. Living a life where I follow a sense of wonder and step into opportunities where I can contribute to something greater than myself has certainly kept me fulfilled, inspired and grateful. It conjures that same feeling I would get walking through campus pondering the journeys of those that came before me. I don't intend to stop following that sense of wonder anytime soon. So I'll just keep pinching myself to ensure I don't miss a thing. — @Adam_Hyndman, Class of 2012 #Princetagram @PrincetonAlumni

#TellUsTigers: "​I have learned to cook from many people, especially all my fellow cooks in 2D, the #vegetarian co-op at #PrincetonU. I am infamous for cooking fried rice. In 2D, we have a huge wok, and cooking rice in it reminds me of the street vendors in Calcutta, where I grew up. I put all the ingredients in, and then many different spices. Then I stir and toss akin to the street vendors. It's also a great arm workout! ​2D is one of the most special places for me at Princeton — truly is a home away from home due to all the wonderful people there. Every member contributes to make the co-op function; all the responsibilities are distributed and everybody has to cook. Everybody is very invested, people are always hanging out in the house at 2 Dickinson St (thus the name, 2D), and people really care for each other. ​Joanna Zhang '19 has an ability to make wonderful baked goods without a plan. Once, she and I made a wonderful carrot concoction (I really can't put a name to it), and while we were waiting for it to be done, we listened to Aaron Swartz '17 and Angelo Campus '16 play wonderful songs on the guitar, and had a really deep and meaningful conversation about our experiences at Princeton. Another time, we pretended that Adrian Tasistro-Hart '17's room was on fire so that he would come eat the birthday cake we baked for him! ​My favorite food memory growing up is my mom's dosas — a fried rice batter in the shape of a crepe. She makes the best dosas. She loves to experiment with them, and they are my main request when I go back home. ​Food in the settings where I grew up is a social occasion — with family or friends. It is a shared experience through which people connect and through which hospitality is shown. There are many cultures in India, and they can be extremely different from each other, but in my culture food is the center of hospitality and connection." — Avaneesh Narla, Class of 2017, physics major, participated in Princeton's @BridgeYearProgram in #Peru, student blogger for Princeton Admission. Photo by Cindy Liu, Class of 2018 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "When I arrived at Princeton, my original plan was to become a school psychologist. However, when I did my student teaching through Princeton's Program in Teacher Preparation, I found that I could have a greater impact on students' lives in the classroom, seeing them every day. Being a teacher is an art form. I teach 7th & 8th grade science at Ocean City Intermediate School. Often, how we see the world around us is also a reflection of ourselves; I love to bring this awareness to my students. As a child, I lived for the outdoors. I was always climbing trees, watching bugs, fascinated by flowers. A nightly star-gazer, I also grew up with a desire to understand space and the universe. I think that studying the natural world is important to everyone as it brings so much wonder to our way of being — to see how small we are in the vast universe, how we are miraculous and unique. This is important today because everyone is so busy and distracted, my students included. I've found that the awe-inspiring 'pause' the natural world can elicit is vital in bringing us back to our roots and our place in the cosmos — a place we sometimes forget. I have been involved in community beach clean-ups, co-wrote and received a grant to install a water garden at our school. A grant I wrote established a partnership between the #Wetlands Institute of Stone Harbor, NJ, and the schools in this district — students K-8 learn more about the back bays (where my class went on a field trip Tuesday!), marine ecosystems, sustainable fishing, water quality and more. I hope that the students develop a sense of gratitude & wonder for nature as well as a deeper understanding of the world. At #PrincetonU, I noticed that everyone had an incredible story to tell or something extraordinary about them. As an educator, I encourage students to tap into their own uniqueness. Their passion. Write their own story. I allow the science classroom to be a means of self-discovery & exploration." — Cory Terry (@beesleybodhi), Class of 2004, one of four outstanding New Jersey secondary school teachers who will be honored at #Princeton17 on June 6. Photo by @meganmacbrown. #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "I don't have anywhere I consider 'home.' I'm Ghanaian & have lived in 8 of the 10 regions of Ghana. My family moved so often because of my dad's work as a Presbyterian pastor. The 4.5 years I've spent at Princeton as a doctoral student is the longest I've ever lived in one place. As an immigrant, I've noticed that #Ghana often gets conflated with all of West Africa. After traveling to Trinidad in 2015, I was stopped by TSA during the height of the Ebola epidemic. The immigration officer saw my passport was from Ghana & grilled me on Ebola for 1.5 hours. I kept assuring them I hadn't been in Ghana for 3 years & reminded them that the US had more reported cases of Ebola than Ghana's zero cases. Eventually, someone started talking to me about her niece who had graduated from #PrincetonU & that seemed to be enough of a connection to let me back into the country. I tell people there are two main privileges to having a dark Black skin — not talking Will Smith or @Beyoncé, more like @Seal's dark Black skin: (1) Protection against sunburn; (2) Everything pops & dazzles more. Like my bright-colored eyeglasses. I receive more compliments than I ever expected; they've become my signature look apparently. Not exaggerating when I say 3 people a month ask me where I got them (online because they were on sale)! My best childhood memory is watching football with my dad on Sunday afternoons. This was our bonding ritual — and the only time my mom would allow me to watch TV uninterrupted for 3 hours. My worst childhood memory is the first 2 years of high school. I attended an all-boys high school in South Africa, a former whites-only school during apartheid. In 2001, it was still an adjustment to have Black & White students learning in the same space & many of my teachers had never taught a Black student before 1994. There was also a lot of animosity from Black South Africans towards Blacks from other African countries. As a result, I was bullied a lot from both sides, probably a combination of racism & xenophobia." — Kobby Aboagye, graduate student (probability & optimization); awarded 2015 Excellence in Teaching Award as a TA; 📷: Cindy Liu '18 #Princetagram

From online to offline, Briana Christophers '17 (@justbriithephotography) met up with Jim Newcomer '57 (@jim_newcomer) at #PrincetonReunions after their initial interaction via our #TellUsTigers Instagram campaign.

#TellUsTigers: "I have to cross Washington Road on my way to work — it's a busy street with lots of traffic — and I often think about what's going on in my brain. I'm a computational neuroscientist, so I study the brain and how it computes. Next time you're waiting to cross Washington (or any other road), think about the complex calculations your brain is carrying out: your retina gets a series of images of a speeding truck; your brain has to interpret those images, estimate how fast the truck is moving, how far away it is, how much time until it arrives, how much time it will take you to cross the road. (If it takes too long making these calculations, it will need to start over!) In my lab, we take data from the brains of animals engaged in similar tasks and seek to identify which neurons are computing the speed of the truck and which are deciding: 'Run — you can make it!' It's pretty well accepted (among neuroscientists at least) that the brain is some kind of computer — an information-processing device that takes information from the senses and computes appropriate responses. But there's massive disagreement about what kind of computer the brain is or how it computes. One of the exciting things about studying the #brain is how little we know, how much there is to discover! Before I got into neuroscience, I studied math and philosophy. I loved the beauty and precision of math, but I was fascinated by consciousness and the mind, the idea that pure matter could be organized to give rise to thoughts and feelings. Computational #neuroscience was a field where I could satisfy both kinds of yearnings. The people in my lab at #PrincetonU come from many backgrounds — engineering, statistics, math, biology, physics, computer science, neuroscience — all of which have different ideas and perspectives to contribute to thinking about how the brain works, which is one of the things that makes it exciting to work together." — Jonathan Pillow, associate professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; photo by Cindy Liu, Class of 2018 #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "The Lewis Center for the Arts (@princetonarts) taught me not to be quiet in the studio. It seems self-evident now, but four years ago it was not obvious that a dancer's voice, thoughts and experiences could be of value in the rehearsal room. Rather than merely seeing bits of choreography and replicating them as best I could, I was asked to engage with material in a very different way. Gradually, the line between physical and intellectual labor was blurred. This helped me stir up the courage to choreograph my own work. It's an empowering feeling and an important dynamic to cultivate in the studio, especially given the dearth of female and minority choreographers. We need more voices represented. Here, I am pictured with my dear friend Bree White (@bpwhite93), Class of 2016. We are improvising in the Fountain of Freedom on campus after our last final exam. Beyond the Lewis Center, Bree and I have collaborated in @puballet and @bodyhype91, two student-run dance companies. I've never felt a more immediate sense of comfort while dancing with someone than I have with Bree. They challenge me and when Bree dances, empathy seems somehow inscribed on their body. I love how Senior Lecturer in Dance Rebecca Lazier (@rjlazier) talks about improvisation. She says it's about negotiation. I find that improv illuminates real-time politics rather than erases it - questions of power are never so clear as when, in an otherwise empty room, people circumvent language and negotiate time and space with their bodies. My history senior thesis, too, dealt with questions of art and power. I traveled to archives in France and Switzerland to research the Paris Opera Ballet during the Nazi Occupation. I found that ballet, a seemingly benign institution, wielded the power to provide an ideological backing to a regime that sought to foster idolization of the government and enact policies that resulted in often fatal deportations. Looking ahead, I hope to examine the intersection of art and politics, in the studio as well as in the archive." - Sophie Andreassi (@sophie_elizabeth_a), Class of 2016 (Photo by @noelvphoto) #Princetagram

#TellUsTigers: "Working on elevators has its ups and downs. There are 194 elevators on the #PrincetonU campus. The strangest thing that's happened in the 14 years I've worked here happened at the Computer Science Center about eight years ago. I was on call and I received a call from Public Safety that a faculty staff member had dropped his fiancé's engagement ring down the elevator shaft. He was showing a friend the 💍 and during the excitement he dropped it between the doors and it fell down the shaft. Good thing we found it because he was getting engaged that weekend. Once in a while someone gets stuck in the elevator, but we are usually on campus and can get them out fairly quickly. The longest was maybe one hour, because it was after hours. The best advice I have for people who have a fear of being in an elevator that free-falls is this: Use the steps, it is healthier. My parents immigrated from Italy in 1959 with nothing and barely spoke English. They both learned English and worked hard at their jobs — my dad for 58 years at RCA (David Sarnoff Research Center) as a foreman groundskeeper and my mom for the Princeton School system. My sister Teresa and I went to St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Princeton. Our parents taught us to respect people, work hard and have pride in what you do. I work hard and sometimes if an elevator is down I will stay late or come in early to repair it so that it does not interrupt others' work schedules. I've been married to my wife, Lisa, for 27 years, and we have two wonderful sons, Michael and Christopher, both college graduates. I am spending #Thanksgiving with my family at our shore house, a tradition we started when our boys were young. We enjoy this time of year at the shore. I will be deep frying a turkey. My wife and daughter in-law’s family will be cooking the rest of the meal. What am I most thankful for this year? The time I get to spend with my family." — Vince Cuomo, lead maintenance technician, elevator. (Photo by @Eric_Hayes_, Class of 2018) #Princetagram

MOST RECENT

#TellUsTigers: "In my research, I try to understand why dogs and wolves are different from each other. Though they are related (like you are related to your cousin), I work to discover how they are different in their genes. I started my PhD research focused on conservation genetics of Yellowstone wolves, at the time at which the dog genome was sequenced. This allowed for incredibly exciting research to be conducted both on dogs & their wild relatives, such as gray wolves & coyotes. I've worked with Yellowstone wolf biologists now for over 10 years. I get to spend many hours thinking about dog breeds & I have essentially waited my whole career to decide on the 'perfect' dog for me. Marla, an #OldEnglishSheepdog, is my first dog — a sweet, adorable 11-month-old puppy. She loves people! I also have two cats I adore, Watson & Dobzhansky, both named after famous geneticists. I know that Marla loves with all that her bones & blood allow. She is such a fascinating creature, with such a desire to be with her humans. I always ponder the major changes that had to have happened to domesticate a wolf into a dog like Marla. She is teaching me about how humans interact differently with people when a dog is involved. I've met more people on campus because students want to hug Marla before they head off to their exam or because they are having a bad day. People just walk up to me & ask to hug Marla. Without any training, she is a service dog & enriches people's lives, unexpectedly. I feel happy I can be a part of that. Cats are so different! Dobie and Watson are very dog-like for cats. They come when their name is called, they demand snuggles. Yet Marla's emotions are far more obvious than any cat I've known; she has ups and downs, good days & bad. She is far more human-like than any cat. I am compelled then to treat her like a child for proper emotional development, exposure and socialization, and enrichment. My cats, though they get similar attention, just do not compare!" — Bridgett vonHoldt, assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology; photo by @Chris_Fascenelli #Princetagram Visit princeton.edu to read vonHoldt's most recent study about the genetics of dogs.

#Repost @princeton_university (@get_repost)
・・・
#TellUsTigers: "In high school, I became interested in women's rights when a female cousin in Morocco was denied educational opportunities simply because she was a girl. For my senior thesis, I wrote about how after the Arab Spring, women were violently pushed out of public squares, frequently sexually assaulted, and victimized & blamed for trying to engage in public discourse & protests. I started to think about the intersection between bodies and honor 7 years ago when my aunt & I were on a bus to Essaouria, a small port city in southern Morocco. We met a girl named Samia who was about 17. Samia & my aunt really hit it off and spoke for about two hours. At a pit stop, Samia excused herself to use the restroom. My aunt turned to me & blurted out, 'She's not a girl!' 'What do you mean she's not a girl — is she a cross-dresser? She looks like a girl,' I said. My aunt said, 'No, I mean that she's been with a man so she's not a girl anymore; she's a woman.' The Arabic word for girl is 'bent' and Samia, because of her previous sexual relations, was now a 'marah' (woman). During the bus ride, I couldn't stop thinking about the language that underlined the fact that men essentially held the diplomas to womanhood. It bothered me that womanhood did not stand on its own & was always attached to something, be it men, virginity or sex in general; a woman couldn't be a woman for herself. From that moment, I knew that I wanted to work on challenging that notion. As part of the Scholars in the Nations Service Initiative (SINSI) at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, I was able to work @USAID, launching an anti-domestic violence co-creation program in Morocco & developing a gender strategy for Tunisia & Rwanda. I interviewed powerful, intelligent women from around the world who are reforming gender structures in their communities. Thanks to #PrincetonU, I've been able work on improving women’s rights & fighting for all the Samias out there who deserve to be in full control of defining their womanhood." — Sajda Ouachtouki @sajdareads, Class of '13; master's in public affairs from @wilson_school *17

#TellUsTigers: "I was a total wine ignoramus when I quit my job as @HuffPost's executive tech editor, begged my way into a job as 'cellar rat' (the lowest of the low in wine), and set out to train as a sommelier. That journey led to my new book 'Cork Dork,' where I chronicle my adventures exploring obsession and the science of taste through my time in @Michelin-starred dining rooms and grueling somm competitions and neuroscientists' labs. In many ways, though, that journey took root years before on the #PrincetonU campus, not far from where we took this photo at #PrincetonReunions. Once a week my sophomore year, I had the privilege of spending hours with one of the great masters of non-fiction: #JohnMcPhee. Prof. McPhee's class revealed the power of great non-fiction — a breed totally distinct from the daily news — to inspire, to expose, to pluck us out of our world and immerse us in someone else's. We analyzed structure, word choice, interviewing, language. And writing these kinds of works began to seem, while not easy, at least possible. When I started to write 'Cork Dork,' I went on a feverish hunt for my notebooks from Prof. McPhee's class. They were the roadmap I needed to begin weaving together my story. Prof. McPhee has a gift for uncovering the miracles in the everyday, whether it’s a train or an orange. And I hope 'Cork Dork' achieves some of the same: far from the tradition and romance that swirls around wine, the reality is far messier, more complex and more interesting than the fairy tale we're told. As part of sharing my newfound knowledge as a #sommelier, I've been doing a series called #pairdevil — pairing wines with the everyday foods we really eat — my way of saying that wine doesn't just have to be for special occasions, it can make occasions special. Hence the Phat Lady I'm holding here from @HoagieHaven (cheese steak with mozzarella sticks & fries). Super meaty, ultra greasy, totally delicious, it gets even better with a zesty Chenin Blanc." — Bianca Bosker (@bbosker), Class of 2008 #Princetagram @princetonalumni #corkdorkbook #NYTBestseller #summerreading

#TellUsTigers: "I was a total wine ignoramus when I quit my job as @HuffPost's executive tech editor, begged my way into a job as 'cellar rat' (the lowest of the low in wine), and set out to train as a sommelier. That journey led to my new book 'Cork Dork,' where I chronicle my adventures exploring obsession and the science of taste through my time in @Michelin-starred dining rooms and grueling somm competitions and neuroscientists' labs. In many ways, though, that journey took root years before on the #PrincetonU campus, not far from where we took this photo at #PrincetonReunions. Once a week my sophomore year, I had the privilege of spending hours with one of the great masters of non-fiction: #JohnMcPhee. Prof. McPhee's class revealed the power of great non-fiction — a breed totally distinct from the daily news — to inspire, to expose, to pluck us out of our world and immerse us in someone else's. We analyzed structure, word choice, interviewing, language. And writing these kinds of works began to seem, while not easy, at least possible. When I started to write 'Cork Dork,' I went on a feverish hunt for my notebooks from Prof. McPhee's class. They were the roadmap I needed to begin weaving together my story. Prof. McPhee has a gift for uncovering the miracles in the everyday, whether it’s a train or an orange. And I hope 'Cork Dork' achieves some of the same: far from the tradition and romance that swirls around wine, the reality is far messier, more complex and more interesting than the fairy tale we're told. As part of sharing my newfound knowledge as a #sommelier, I've been doing a series called #pairdevil — pairing wines with the everyday foods we really eat — my way of saying that wine doesn't just have to be for special occasions, it can make occasions special. Hence the Phat Lady I'm holding here from @HoagieHaven (cheese steak with mozzarella sticks & fries). Super meaty, ultra greasy, totally delicious, it gets even better with a zesty Chenin Blanc." — Bianca Bosker (@bbosker), Class of 2008 #Princetagram @princetonalumni #corkdorkbook #NYTBestseller #summerreading

Summer is all about adventures! Can you hear its call? Can you sense its magic while discovering new places and creating memories that will last forever? 🌞🏄🚣 #Harvard #Dance #ballet #photography #artsfirst
#Yale #Engineering #Innovation #Design #YaleCollege
#Cornell #CornellNYC #CornellDays
#ColumbiaUniversity #roarlionroar
#Penn #PennVet #PennPride
#TellUsTigers #PrincetonU #Princetagram
#Dartmouth #Dartmouthcollege #Dartmouth21s
#BrownUniversity #CampusDance

#TellUsTigers: "Freedom is the ability to live a life of one's own choosing, where one can love whom they want, worship whom they choose, be whom they want, pursue their passions, maximize their potential & contribute fully to community as their best self without fear of persecution. Over the entrance of McCosh 50 at #PrincetonU is an inscription that reads: 'Here we were taught by men and Gothic towers, democracy and faith and righteousness and love of unseen things that do not die.' Princeton offered me the unparalleled opportunity to broaden my worldview, discover & forge new friendships with folks from near & far & relentlessly pursue the questions & problem sets that would later become my passions. If there's anything I've learned in my time in the @usarmy & my shorter time in Iraq, it is that 'winning' wars is hard, unforgiving & difficult work that sometimes must be done. Faced with daunting odds, it is easy to harbor doubts. When I wrestle with the length of the road we have to march, I try to remember the kids I've met here in Iraq. It really is hard to give up on that hope when you see them smiling & laughing with eyes full of hope, though they've lost so much. We owe it to them & to those paratroopers, soldiers & other public servants we've lost in the pursuit of that future to remain moving ever forward. Through my entire life, I've been drawn to a life of service. My grandfather served in Korea as a forward observer (field artilleryman) with the @marines. My father has served with the Mt. Olive Township, New Jersey, Police Department for more than 30 years. For nearly 35 years, my mother has been a leader of a non-profit that provides therapy to victims of child abuse. The Army presented me an opportunity to challenge myself, lead others & serve something larger than myself. I have always believed that if we are to have an opinion about putting others in harm's way, we ought to have been willing to put ourselves in harm's way first." — @zachbeecher, Class of 2013, @wilson_school major, captain on the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, stationed in Iraq. Photo by SGT Luke Wilson. Full story appears on princeton.edu. #Princetagram #4thofjuly

#TellUsTigers: "It is 15 years before Mandela becomes President, and South Africa, a country I left at 17, is still in the grip of apartheid. It is my 38th year. It is October, which the Afrikaners call die mooiste maand, the prettiest month, our spring. My mother calls with the news. My brother-in-law, a heart surgeon and protégé of Christiaan Barnard, the first doctor to transplant a human heart successfully, has managed to drive his car off a deserted, dry road and into a lamppost. Wearing his seat belt he has survived, but my sister was not so lucky. Her ankles and wrists, braced against the dashboard, were broken on impact. “She died instantly,” my mother assures me. I wonder how one knows such a thing and think of that moment of terror in the dark. I take a plane out to Johannesburg and go straight to the morgue. I am not sure why I feel I must do this. Perhaps I cannot believe my only sister, not yet 40 years old, the mother of six young children, is dead. Perhaps I believe the sight of her familiar face and body will make it clear. Or perhaps I just want to be beside her, to hold her one last time in my arms. I stand waiting with my hands on the glass, looking into the bright, bare, empty room with the sloping floor made of reddish stone, which dips slightly in the center to provide drainage from the dissection table. Then they wheel her body in. I cannot touch her, hold her, comfort her. I cannot ever heal her. Her whole body is wrapped in a white sheet, only her flower-face tilted up toward me: the broad forehead, the small, dimpled chin, the slanting eyes, the waxy skin. It is my face, our face, the face of our common ancestors. It is the heart-shaped face she would turn up to me obediently when, as children, we played the game of Doll. This moment is the beginning of endless years of yearning and regret. It is also the beginning of my writing life. Again and again, I will turn to the page to recapture this moment, my sister's life, and her spirit." — excerpt from "Once We Were Sisters" (@penguinrandomhouse), the new memoir by Sheila Kohler, lecturer in creative writing (@PrincetonArts); photo by @eganjimenez #Princetagram

#Repost @princeton_university (@get_repost)
・・・
#TellUsTigers: "I have to cross Washington Road on my way to work — it's a busy street with lots of traffic — and I often think about what's going on in my brain. I'm a computational neuroscientist, so I study the brain and how it computes. Next time you're waiting to cross Washington (or any other road), think about the complex calculations your brain is carrying out: your retina gets a series of images of a speeding truck; your brain has to interpret those images, estimate how fast the truck is moving, how far away it is, how much time until it arrives, how much time it will take you to cross the road. (If it takes too long making these calculations, it will need to start over!) In my lab, we take data from the brains of animals engaged in similar tasks and seek to identify which neurons are computing the speed of the truck and which are deciding: 'Run — you can make it!' It's pretty well accepted (among neuroscientists at least) that the brain is some kind of computer — an information-processing device that takes information from the senses and computes appropriate responses. But there's massive disagreement about what kind of computer the brain is or how it computes. One of the exciting things about studying the #brain is how little we know, how much there is to discover! Before I got into neuroscience, I studied math and philosophy. I loved the beauty and precision of math, but I was fascinated by consciousness and the mind, the idea that pure matter could be organized to give rise to thoughts and feelings. Computational #neuroscience was a field where I could satisfy both kinds of yearnings. The people in my lab at #PrincetonU come from many backgrounds — engineering, statistics, math, biology, physics, computer science, neuroscience — all of which have different ideas and perspectives to contribute to thinking about how the brain works, which is one of the things that makes it exciting to work together." — Jonathan Pillow, associate professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; photo by Cindy Liu, Class of 2018 #Princetagram

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags