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The experiment by Simon Kramis, University of Basel @unibasel SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
A freshly exhumed human #femur is damaged with various excavation tools. The traces are then examined by scanning electron microscopy. The experiment is designed to help distinguish the digestive #artifacts from the effects of the forces. The recording was made by means of a table stand and a digital SLR camera.
The presentation combines objects that do not belong at first glance. They are well-known and less well-known tools as well as a human bone. The pictures show that these tools could act in some way on the bone, since this is the only object that deviates from the rest and lies differently. The color combination was very aesthetic. ¦ Image#1_253

Scientific Euphoria by Benzi Kirell, EPFL #epfl SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
#euphoria #scientific
Visualization of a spatio-temporal network of retweets around the rumor of the discovery of the Boson de Higgs in 2012. Each node represents a tweet, they are connected as a function of time by following the gradient of color blue to purple following the topology Of the followers graph on Twitter. The full technical description is given in this publication: arxiv.org/abs/1504.08153
On July 4, 2012, CERN physicists found evidence of a new elementary particle predicted by Peter Higgs in 1964. This network shows the retweet flow through time as the rumor surrounding the discovery grew . Starting from the blue knots up to the violets below, the tweets are connected if they have been retweetés by the followers. Strikingly, our spiral network splits into two large spatio-temporal communities with Europe in the center and the United States below. The number of connections in this network clearly shows that no frontier can contain the joy that results from a great scientific discovery ¦ Image#1_26

#Repost @swissnationalsciencefoundation ・・・
Laser Stroke by Dereka Bogdan, University of Geneva @unigeneve SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
#laser #stroke Date: 16 October 2016
Focal length: 70 mm
ISO: 400
Exposure: 25 s at f/9
No flash
No Photoshop modifications
Object: Seven quartz cuvettes containing fluorescent dyes with different fluorescence colors. Blue laser light comes from the left and excites fluorescence of the dyes in the cuvettes one by one by passing through all of them. A selection of dyes allows to recover the entire rainbow of colors or the visible electromagnetic spectrum from their fluorescence. Fluorescence is excited only along the optical path of the blue excitation beam.
Special: Shot is made in the dark laser lab. During the exposure the laser light in air was visualized by carefully mouth-blowing the evaporating liquid nitrogen into the laser beams to increase light scattering in air.
Fluorescence is a great physical phenomenon occurring when light interacts with certain molecules and energizes (excites) them. Trying to get rid of that excess energy molecules emit light which can be of very different color compared to the excitation light. This process could be used for many purposes allowing us to take a look at what happens inside the molecules. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique that allows to understand what happens with substances and how to utilize that knowledge. ¦ Image#3_22

Pictures of our competition at the @zurichfilmfestival @eyeonscience #SwissScienceImage

The SNSF Scientific Image Competiton will return in 2018.
Official announcement to come in November 2018. Stay tuned and don't forget to take your camera to your lab and in field research! #SwissScienceImage

The ESPRESSO vessel by Blind Nicolas, University of Geneva @unigeneve SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
#espresso Date: 22.12.2016
Lens: Sigma 10-20mm @10mm
Subject: front and back views of the ESPRESSO spectrograph and vacuum vessel, a few hours before the latter is closed for tests. It shows the optical bench, the optical fibers, and all cabling necessary to monitor and control the temperature and vacuum levels.
Post-processing: The integration hall, originally visible in the background, has been removed to highlight the instrument geometry and structure. The front and back pictures were combined in a single one with Gimp.
Front and back views of the ESPRESSO spectrograph optical bench, surrounded by the vacuum vessel with its tubular shape. On the left image, the prominent, massive rectangular bloc is the echelle grating. On its top are the optical fibers (protected in the black cables) that carry the stellar and calibration light to the spectrograph entrance.
During operations, the spectrograph optical bench of ESPRESSO is placed inside this large vacuum vessel (about 2m high), and is insulated from the outside to keep its temperature constant to better than 0.001°C through its operation life of 10 years and more. Such long-term stability is fundamental to detect rocky planets similar to the Earth. Otherwise, the signal from the planet would be lost within the spectrograph own hourly variations. ¦ Image#3_10

Designing a tree with a tree’s major component by Hausmann Michael, EMPA #empa SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Produced the 11.01 for this contest, this image derives and utilizes concepts developed in my research project.
The image was recorded between two cross polarized filters with a Canon EOS camera (50 mm focal length) and a white LED. The tree has a high of 6.7 cm and a maximal width of 7 cm. This image illustrates the effect of both #concentration and shear #alignment of #cellulosenanocrystals (CNC) dispersed in water. Extracted from wood pulp CNCs are typically 120 nm long and 6 nm in diameter. The negative surface charges present on CNCs brings them to self-assemble and interact to-gether. At lower viscosity (10 wt%), casted CNC solutions organize themselves in various nematic do-mains with preferential alignment direction, each interacting differently with light and creating this magical patchwork for colors. On the other side, extruded 15 wt% CNC inks present thinner and uni-form structures because of the shear induced alignment of CNCs along the printing direction.
Printing a tree with one of its major constituent, cellulose, is intended to highlight the renewability of this biomaterial. Originally extracted from wood, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are used in divers do-mains such as the food and pharma industry but also, because of their incredible mechanical proper-ties, as reinforcing material for composite applications.
This image was designed combining two methods utilized to process CNCs in the composite field. The first method developed earlier is solution casting where a water based CNC dispersion is purred into a mold, constituting the inner part of the tree. The second more recent technique is direct ink writing, where the disposition of the material is computer controlled such as to create the actual casting mold, the contours of the tree.
Because of their nanometric size and needle like shape, CNCs dispersed in water interact with light. Observed between cross polarized filters, the casting method leaves the possibility to the crystals to self-assemble into various micro-sized domains interacting differently with ligh

When simplicity creates complexity by Bernardo Garcia Francisco Javier, University of Fribourg @unifribourg SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
#Drosophilaretina This micrograph shows a confocal section of a whole-mounted Drosophila retina belonging to a late pupa. To take this image, I used a strain that contains a genetic construct which induces the expression of RFP (magenta) in the nuclei of both pigment and photoreceptor cells. All cell nuclei appear stained with Hoechst (cyan), and membranes were immunostained for E-cadherin (yellow). Imaging was performed on a Leica SP5 confocal microscope.
A diversity of cell types can be observed in this image of a fruit fly retina. Cell membranes appear in yellow, and their nuclei either in magenta—pigment and photoreceptor cell nuclei—or in cyan—all nuclei—. Importantly, the number and the position of cells is precisely regulated during development, which causes the appearance of a highly stereotypical pattern. This arises from the orderly repetition of rossette-shaped, hexagonal structures called ommatidia, which are light-sensing units that, together, form the insect compound eye. As a whole, these images show a tremendous degree of order and complexity within such a small biological structure as an eye belonging to a fruit fly. ¦ Image#1_35

#Repost @swissnationalsciencefoundation ・・・
The Warhol Embryo by Cirillo Luca, University of Geneva @unigeneve SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
#warhol #embryo
Artistic representation of the first two cell cycles of a C. elegans embryo in DIC microscopy. The panels are inspired by Andy Warhol’s serigraphies of Marilyn Monroe.
Caenorabditis elegans is a tiny worm widely used as a model system in basic research. Here there are depicted in an artistic manner the first stages of its embryonic development. Top left: after fertilization, the nucleus from the male and the one from the female become visible in C. elegans egg. Then the two nuclei meet (top right) and the first cell division starts (middle left). When the first division is completed two cells are formed (middle right). Shortly after the first division the second division starts in an asynchronous manner: the cell at the anterior divides first (bottom right). After this second round of cell division, a four cells embryo is formed (bottom left). This embryo will keep dividing until the formation of the entire animal in a process that takes around 24 hours. The colors and the style have been inspired by Andy Warhol’s serigraphies of Marilyn Monroe. ¦ Image#1_64

MOST RECENT

Concours! A vos caméras! Rendre visible la recherche suisse.
Le Fonds national suisse (FNS) @swissnationalsciencefoundation organise pour la seconde fois un concours de photos et de vidéos scientifiques. Ce dernier est ouvert à tous les scientifiques des institutions de recherche en Suisse. Délai de participation 31 janvier 2018.
Intéressé-e-s? Toutes les informations sur bit.ly/hesso_concours_FNS.
Découvrez les lauréats 2017 en suivant #swissscienceimage
#recherche #visible #concours #concoursphoto #concoursvideo #chercheuses #chercheurs

The SNSF Scientific Image Competition 2018 is on! Grab your cameras and send us your best pictures and short videos before 31 January 2018. #SwissScienceImage
The winning entries will be exhibited at the @bielerfototage .

Pictures of our competition at the @zurichfilmfestival @eyeonscience #SwissScienceImage

The SNSF Scientific Image Competiton will return in 2018.
Official announcement to come in November 2018. Stay tuned and don't forget to take your camera to your lab and in field research! #SwissScienceImage

The experiment by Simon Kramis, University of Basel @unibasel SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
A freshly exhumed human #femur is damaged with various excavation tools. The traces are then examined by scanning electron microscopy. The experiment is designed to help distinguish the digestive #artifacts from the effects of the forces. The recording was made by means of a table stand and a digital SLR camera.
The presentation combines objects that do not belong at first glance. They are well-known and less well-known tools as well as a human bone. The pictures show that these tools could act in some way on the bone, since this is the only object that deviates from the rest and lies differently. The color combination was very aesthetic. ¦ Image#1_253

Acoustically isolated confocal microscope with improvised micromanipulation setup by Kozintsev Alexander, University of Geneva @unigeneve SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
This image was taken using a Samsung Galaxy S5 and processed via Instagram using the filter "Gingham" as well as brightness/contrast adjustments.
Pictured is a confocal light-scanning microscope (Confocal A1, Nikon AG) with a 60x (CFI PLAN APO LBDA 60XH, Nikon) and 40x oil objectives (CFI PLAN FLUOR 40X Oil A, Nikon). The #microscope, which has an integrated perfect focus system, resides on an active vibration isolation platform (Accurion, i4 series) and is housed in an acoustic enclosure (JPK Instruments). Next to the microscope on a "Faust" catalogue book is a manual micromanipulator (MM-33 by Marzhauser Wetzlar GmbH & Co. KG) along with a magnetic stand (Holex, #441210).
As part of an improvised experimental setup to manipulate nanostructures directly in samples, a micromanipulator rests on a catalogue book next to a confocal scanning microscope. In order to mitigate the effect of any vibrations on the micromanipulator, both it and the microscope reside on an active anti-vibration table, housed in an acoustically-isolated enclosure. ¦ Image#3_56

Designing a tree with a tree’s major component by Hausmann Michael, EMPA #empa SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Produced the 11.01 for this contest, this image derives and utilizes concepts developed in my research project.
The image was recorded between two cross polarized filters with a Canon EOS camera (50 mm focal length) and a white LED. The tree has a high of 6.7 cm and a maximal width of 7 cm. This image illustrates the effect of both #concentration and shear #alignment of #cellulosenanocrystals (CNC) dispersed in water. Extracted from wood pulp CNCs are typically 120 nm long and 6 nm in diameter. The negative surface charges present on CNCs brings them to self-assemble and interact to-gether. At lower viscosity (10 wt%), casted CNC solutions organize themselves in various nematic do-mains with preferential alignment direction, each interacting differently with light and creating this magical patchwork for colors. On the other side, extruded 15 wt% CNC inks present thinner and uni-form structures because of the shear induced alignment of CNCs along the printing direction.
Printing a tree with one of its major constituent, cellulose, is intended to highlight the renewability of this biomaterial. Originally extracted from wood, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are used in divers do-mains such as the food and pharma industry but also, because of their incredible mechanical proper-ties, as reinforcing material for composite applications.
This image was designed combining two methods utilized to process CNCs in the composite field. The first method developed earlier is solution casting where a water based CNC dispersion is purred into a mold, constituting the inner part of the tree. The second more recent technique is direct ink writing, where the disposition of the material is computer controlled such as to create the actual casting mold, the contours of the tree.
Because of their nanometric size and needle like shape, CNCs dispersed in water interact with light. Observed between cross polarized filters, the casting method leaves the possibility to the crystals to self-assemble into various micro-sized domains interacting differently with ligh

The most beautiful tools of a doctor's surgery instruments are neatly arranged by Jeannette Von Jackowski, University Hospital Basel #unispitalbasel SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
This snapshot was recorded in the operating room with a #smartphone, after the operator had placed the instruments neatly in the sterile strainer from the operator's angle, about 5 centimeters away
Unfortunately, further technical descriptions are not available, as the registration card / link / category indicated on the Internet will never open for this
It is a snapshot that was photographed from the #surgeon's point of view at the very beginning of the upcoming #operation, during which samples were taken for a study. The photographer / operator came too soon to the planned surgery. The patient was not yet in the operating room and the instrumental nursing staff was just sorting the sterile biopsy instruments on the sterile table when the photo was taken. The photo was taken on the instruments when they were neatly arranged, still in the sterile basket, before they were taken out and arranged in a certain arrangement on the sterile operating table. The sight is not so frequent for a doctor / researcher / researcher / researcher, since these usually only enter the operating room, when everything is already installed and prepared. The sight or the view from my angle fascinated me, because it looked at the same time for me one-to-one, but for people who do not come from the medical research rather abstractly acting. The photo might just as well as puzzles: What is it? A panel and, in my opinion, the answers would be very different. ¦ Image#3_52

Seahorse by Santamaria Albert, University of Fribourg @unifribourg SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge directly through the ocular of a Leica DM5500 microscope. January 2017. The image shows a section of a MMTV-PyMT mammary gland #tumor stained for an extracellular matrix component. I liked the resemblance to a #seahorse and the modest quality of the picture itself.
Is it a seahorse? Maybe a dragon? Or I just partied for too long last night? As a matter of fact the microscopic world hids thousands of treasures, uncountable gems, shapes and forms. Even in the most unsuspected places, as in this section of a breast tumor that I was studying. It's just like when we lie on the grass and look at those clouds in the sky and we see all kind of beautiful shapes... ¦ Image#1_238

ShadesofGlass by Aeby Elise, ETH Zurich @ethzurich #ethz SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
This picture was taken with a Nikon D7000, using a lense AF-S Micro Nikkor 60 mm, the lighting was done with a common desktop lamp. This picture was taken on the 11th of October 2016.
#Glass bottles are essential for storing substances, and the dark #tubes can be used to store light-sensitive material. The picture captures simple things we use in a #laboratory environment. ¦ Image#3_2

Pull in the same Direction by Joelle Medinger, University of Fribourg @unifribourg SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
SEM pictures with magnification of 50 μm and 20 μm, respectively." No further transformations.Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop to put the pictures together and add the scalebar. Recorded: Friday 4th of November 2016. Porous #Silica monolith obtained by a sol-gel process. Magnetic nanoparticles were added to the solution and but the poles of an #electromagnet. The #nanoparticles align with the same needle-like structure (picture 1). Silica has a high affinity for the magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles act as smart templates for structure control. The dried monolith is impregnated again with silica precursor + nanoparticle solution. It is put orthogonal to initial rod-structure direction in the magnet. The needles are now interconnected. (Picture 2).The obtained monolith with controlled structure in two dimensions has 10 times higher mechanical stability.
The magnetic field is a directing force. It has the power to align the nanoparticles along its direction. Our society is also guided by people with power. Silica adopts the same structure as predicted by the nanoparticles. They go "hand in hand". By "moving" in the same direction and by the interconnection, the stability and resistance of the formed structure is increased. If people would move more often "hand in hand" in the same direction, having an affinity and sensibility for the path (direction) of other species and interconnected, the scaffold of humanity would be gain in resistance and stability too. ¦ Image#1_150

Police Station, Kinshasa by Perazzone Stephanie, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies #graduateinstitute SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Dimensions: 3264 x 2448
Focal Length
Number F: 2.2
Exhibition program: 2
Exposure time: 1/33
#Commandant A. is the head of the #Djalo Police Sub-Commissariat in #Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. At the head of a dozen men under his command, he made me take this picture under his own instructions. He first removed a formal ceremonial uniform from a hook on the wall, protected it in a dusty plastic, and then proceeded to take out his Talkie-Walkie and put his black spectacles on his nose. He dusted off his desk a little, pushed aside the bulky objects and file folders filled with reports, then stood, straight as an 'i', facing me, ready to be photographed. While the Congolese National Police is known both to the inhabitants and the international community for its lack of professionalism and brutality, to put forward - and in image - its share of humanity, the vulnerability of its members, was ultimately , Almost the easiest. The Commander, like all the low-level state personnel, is sorely lacking in material means to do his job. However, this cliché reminds us that the human presence, the bodies, the voice, the uniform try to palliate the absence of public infrastructures. ¦ Image#1_228

Assurance of sample by Gilbert Projer, WSL #wsl_research SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Camera: Canon 6D, lens: 24-105 mm / 2.8, focal length: 28 mm, aperture: 6.3 shutter speed: 1/320;
Date of recording: 29.09.2016
In the #Naturwaldreservat #Seeliwald / OW, every single sample, if found, is measured and assured with the existing #trees.
The sample network is first created digitally and then the individual samples are started with the handheld GPS. On site, an aluminum profile is placed in the sample center and the center is measured and insured with at least three nearby trees. ¦ Image#3_36

Ecology in motion by Scherler Patrick, Other SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
Adult #redkite (Milvus milvus) equipped with a GPS-transmitter (brown device) on its back in front of a forest edge in Western #Switzerland. Picture was taken at 1st of June 2016 with a Canon 7D DSLR and a 300mm F2.8 lens without additional lighting. Picture was taken at a shutter speed of 1/2000 (ISO 500, F3.5) to capture the motion in Flight resulting in a sharp center part of body and blurred wing tips. Post-processing in Photoshop Lightroom 5 resulted in minor changes of clarity, contrast and sharpness. This raptor was captured close to its nesting site in the context of the SNF supported project on Population ecology of red kites in Switzerland of the Swiss Ornithological Institute.
The adult red kite (Milvus milvus) in this picture carries a small GPS transmitter on its back and contributes with the data it collects to understand this species’ ecology, produce cutting-edge research contributions in the field of population and movement ecology and to implement conservation measures. This raptor was captured close to its nesting site in the context of the SNF supported project on Population ecology of red kites in Switzerland of the Swiss Ornithological Institute. By following the bird’s movement trajectories the research team gains insight in the ecological factors affecting the life-history of the bird from capturing to its death. This individual is one of 180 red kites contributing data to this study aiming at understanding settlement processes and explaining the current local increase of the species in Switzerland. The picture was taken during behavioral observations and shows the bird in low flight in its preferred habitat over a meadow close to a forest edge in the Canton of Fribourg. The Swiss Ornithological Institute aims at turning all scientific findings acquired by this fundamental research project into conservation implications for this raptor species suffering declines in many European populations. ¦ Image#1_239

No Speed Limit by Schuck Marcel, ETH Zurich @ethzurich #ethz SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
The photograph was created on February 7, 2017 and shows a close-up view of the world’s fastest #electricmotor. The displayed sphere, which is used as a #rotor, is freely levitated in space and has a #diameter in the millimeter range. The surrounding shows other components of the motor as well as the required laboratory equipment in the far background. A focal length of 40 mm was chosen and an aperture value of 4.5 creates the desired low depth of focus. Besides artificial background lighting, the sphere is illuminated by a red LED, which is also used for the sensor system of the motor.
The photograph shows a close-up view of the world’s fastest electric motor, which has been developed at the Power Electronic Systems Laboratory of ETH Zurich. The motor reaches rotational speeds of more than 40’000’000 revolutions per minute, which is the world record for the highest rotational speed ever achieved by such a machine and more than 100 times faster than a dental drill. To achieve such high speeds, a very small steel sphere, which is visible in the picture, is freely levitated without friction by electromagnets and used as a rotor. At full speed, a point on the equator of the sphere reaches a speed of more than 3000 km/h.
The previous rotational speed record had already been set in 1946 but could not be reproduced afterwards. This caused the researchers at ETH to accept the challenge and finally bring the world record to Switzerland after 70 years.
The developed system can be used in materials testing applications and the underlying research paves the way for ultra-compact and highly efficient electrical drives, which are essential to creating a sustainable energy future. ¦ Image#1_246

Hunting Supermassive Black Holes by Oh Kyuseok, ETH Zurich #ethz @ethzurich SNSF Scientific Image Competition #SwissScienceImage
This photo was taken at Las Campanas Observatory in Central #Chile last September while I was observing #galaxies which host supermassive #blackholes in their center. I used Nikon D810 camera with Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm 1:1.4G lens. To secure clearly focused shot, I used a tripod which prevent getting blurry images. In order to prevent star trails (i.e., paths of stars due to long-enough exposure time), I used 15 seconds of exposure time with f/2.8 aperture size under 2000 of ISO value in manual focus mode.
In the photo, there are lots of astronomical objects. In particular, Large Magellanic Cloud (shown in the middle) and Small Magellanic Cloud (shown in the upper-right corner) are particularly catch our eyes. Those two external galaxies which will be merged with our home galaxy, Milky way, in few billion years are only visible in Southern hemisphere.
Astronomers observe night sky to study various kinds of stunning objects using the state-of-the-art telescopes at the summit of mountain, in the middle of desert, or even in space. Although all night sky objects steal our heart, supermassive black holes are particularly interesting as they lie in the very center of almost every external galaxy including our home, the Milky way. By studying growth mechanism of supermassive black holes and the structure of obscuring material surrounding them, we shed light on the great mysteries in astronomy: how super massive black holes grow, and how host galaxy evolve in a cosmic time scale, and how they affect each other.
The photo was taken last September at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile (2380m of altitude) while we were hunting supermassive black holes which are located in several hundreds million light years of distance from us.
The Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of Milky Way. Mapuche people living in south-central Latin America continent (mainly Chile and Argentina) believed that there used to be three Magellanic clouds unlike what we are seeing in the today’s night sky. They thought one is disappeared long time ago, one is on the way

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