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#seeingedinburgh

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"Sun ☀️ Day in the Park": Taking advantage of a sunny day, people flood into a park lawn to soak up the warm rays.
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Scotland's weather changes from moment to moment, and rain and clouds are the norm, so it seems the residents don't let moments like this go to waste!
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Our first day and a half in the city was in fact a rollercoaster of sun, clouds and sudden rainstorms. But our last day in Edinburgh was the warmest of the year and super sunny. Not as good for the moody Scottish pictures 😉
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This area is the 'New Town' (well, newer as in 18th Century) that expanded beyond the previous walls and in fact was one of the first proper grid-planned towns. In the U.S., many of the city planners used Edinburgh's New Town street grid system as a model, in fact. Today, on the upper side of the park (to the left in this photo) Prince street is an upper-end shopping district.

Such a great cycle along to Cramond, weather is stunning and I went past several future husbands... 🙊 One was even sporting a pug. #HALLEYLOO #heathyliving #seeingedinburgh #edinburgh #cramond #beach #yacht #forth #fabulouslyscottish #summerbod

If I'm living a dream, please, dont wake me up! #edinburghcastle

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"Writers of Edinburgh": So, this one has nothing to do with the picture, except in that when strolling through Edinburgh, particularly the older areas of the Royal Mile, some of the strange, fantastical architecture -- the narrow alleys, sculptures, wynds and tollbooth clocks -- have a certain Harry Potter quality. And this is no coincidence, since JK Rowling is Scottish and wrote much of Harry Potter right here in Edinburgh -- no doubt basing her descriptions of locales such as Diagon Alley on features of the city.
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Likewise, Edinburgh is also the home city of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. And you can definitely see shades of Edinburgh in some of the detective's adventures.
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Edinburgh is also home to the largest monument to a writer in the world: the Scott Monument. Dedicated to Sir Walter Scott -- whose novels and writings captured the imagination of the 19th century Victorian-era English with the romance of the Highlands and greatly contributed to the subsequent lifting of bans on displays of Highland culture that had been imposed in the years after the defeat of the Jacobite rebellions at Culloden.

"Sun ☀️ Day in the Park": Taking advantage of a sunny day, people flood into a park lawn to soak up the warm rays.
.
Scotland's weather changes from moment to moment, and rain and clouds are the norm, so it seems the residents don't let moments like this go to waste!
.
Our first day and a half in the city was in fact a rollercoaster of sun, clouds and sudden rainstorms. But our last day in Edinburgh was the warmest of the year and super sunny. Not as good for the moody Scottish pictures 😉
.
This area is the 'New Town' (well, newer as in 18th Century) that expanded beyond the previous walls and in fact was one of the first proper grid-planned towns. In the U.S., many of the city planners used Edinburgh's New Town street grid system as a model, in fact. Today, on the upper side of the park (to the left in this photo) Prince street is an upper-end shopping district.

"The Closes and Wynds of Edinburgh": Between the tall, narrow hurdy gurdy 16th century towers were endless incredibly narrow dead-end alleys called variously Closes and Wynds.
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The entire city of the time was this central spine of the 'Royal Mile' road and these narrow lanes buzzing with activity. This eccentric and chaotic urban landscape resembled a city built like a 'gutted fish' according to contemporary accounts.
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A 'Close' didn't get it's name because the walls were close together -- instead because the alleys had gates that could be 'closed' for the protection of the residents (although in plague times, it had also been used in some cases to 'quarantine' the population of a block forcibly ☠️). Wynds likewise aren't named such because they curve, but indicate an offshoot street.
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One of the strange charms of Edinburgh is some of the exceptionally macabre and odd elements of it's history which is often even more checkered than many medieval cities.

"Honour Guard": A sentry steals a quick glance across the gate to the opposite guard booth. Like the Buckingham guards, the goal is for them to stand rigidly at attention.
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The 1st Batallion Highlanders has stood sentry at Edinburgh Castle for centuries (in of course a purely ceremonial role now for the benefit of visitors). Although in 2002, the Army had briefly considered withdrawing them -- a plan that generated massive public uproar.
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Edinburgh Castle is frankly very touristy and visitng is a bit like going to a Disneyland park. This is also true of much of the Royal Mile -- the main historic stretch of Edinburgh. The castle itself is quite impressive, though as it's huge and well preserved...
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But actually, it's touristy aspect is itself historical. In the 19th century, English Victorian-era tourists were seduced by the 'romance of the Highlands' and Edinburgh proceeded to remake itself for the benefit of these visitors in ways big and small that you can see throughout the city if one looks closely. In some ways, it's become part of the city's fabric.

Hi, Again! 💜And welcome to our travelogue for Scotland 2017. We landed in Edinburgh and from there headed to Glasgow and into the Highlands, which although geographically close is surprisingly isolated and worlds apart from the cities.
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For the next month or so, we'll be posting photos (and more) of Scotland. For the first round, we'll put up posts in the order we visited, sort of following our journey. Afterwards, we'll be putting up posts that aren't in strict 'geographical order' and organized by theme! We hope you enjoy 😀
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We thought this was a great opening image to introduce our Scotland retrospective. This is a shot of the Old Calton Burial Ground and Governor's House in the early morning mists (there's a reason so many ghost stories are from Scotland! 👻)
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The obelisk monument in the burial ground is the Martyr's Monument dedicated to the "Chartist Martyrs" led by Thomas Muir, who was convicted and executed for advocating for universal voting rights (versus just rights for landowners). The "Governor's House" is a bit of a misnomer, as this building is the last remaining portion (the housing of the governor) of the Carlton Gaol -- a notoriously horrendous prison that is said to be haunted by the ghosts of the wrongly convicted. In 1937, when the prison site was converted to St. Andrews house government administration buildings, there were people for years who refused to step inside!

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