#sallyswritingprocess

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By demand: today's post of #sallyswritingprocess is Do I treat writing like a REAL job?

I used to give people major side-eye when they asked me this, but lately I have come to realise that people are genuinely confused. After all, I work alone, often in my pyjamas, and regularly from bed. There is no one (apart from, occasionally, my kids) standing over me, cracking the whip. And there is a lovely, whimsical feeling about being a writer that simply feels at odds with the word 'job.' Right?

And yet, I do treat writing novels like a real job. Here are three reasons why:

1) I don't have another job (unless you count being a mum, which, of course, is a full-time job. But I, like any other working mum, have childcare.) Last year I was working 4 days a week, and since Clementine was born I've dropped it down to 3. Next year when Clementine is older I'll go back to 4, and eventually, I'll work 5 days.

2. I have deadlines. While I still find this astonishing, people are waiting for my books. My editor, my agent, potentially even some readers. If I didn't meet those deadlines, my writing career would be short.

3. Finally, and perhaps most unspeakably (because for some reason, in the creative field ๐Ÿ’ต should never be spoken about)... writing pays me money. And as romantic as it sounds to live on reader love and ramen noodles (I actually really love ramen noodles so no shade being thrown here) I also like money. Ramen noodles ๐Ÿœ taste better in a house. With the heater on (especially today). Over to you. Do you treat your job like a REAL job?
My husband says his accountancy job is a cover for his real identity as a budding professional golfer ๐ŸŒ ๐Ÿ™„ #dadjokes

Cold winter morning writing essentials โ„๏ธ ๐Ÿ’ป โ˜•๏ธ ๐ŸŽ‚#sallyhepworth #sallyswritingprocess #bookstagram #authorsofinstagram #author #winter #winterishere

In today's episode of #sallyswritingprocess I talk about ... being a recluse.โ €
.โ €
Yep. Iโ€™m a recluse. โ €
. โ €
Seriously. I am. Why doesn't anyone ever believe me when I say this? It's true. I'm a writer after all. We are famous for it. โ €
. โ €
Hereโ€™s the deal. Iโ€™ve never gone out dancing and never plan to. Iโ€™d take waterboarding over a stand up cocktail party. Groups of more than five people make me twitch. Generally, if i see anyone I know in public, I'll dive behind the nearest telephone pole to avoid them. For reals. Including people I like. (True story: I once saw my mum in the street and crossed the road. I called her later and told her. She was not offended in the least. She would have crossed the road too, she admitted. And we are very close.) The fact is, I come from a solid line of reclusive types. My Dad lives a two hour drive from everyone he knows, including my mum, to whom he is still happily married. We are not socially inept, in fact, some might say we are reasonably skilled in the art of conversation. We simply value solitude, comfort and familiarity. Night out dancing? ๐Ÿคข Night on the couch, with a blanket, a book and a hot chocolate? ๐ŸŽ‰ โ €
.โ €
Interesting exception: I will (and often do) happily talk in front of a packed room of strangers about books and writing. In fact, that stuff is totally MY JAM.โ €
.โ €
Now, I do know a few wildly extroverted writers so I'm not suggesting that you have to be a recluse to write. I do, however, wonder if there is a link between the recluse and the creative ... something about us needing time and space to process things? Maybe the way we absorb the world is exhausting and overwhelming? Maybe we're just a bunch of lazy intolerants who only want to engage on our own terms? Not sure. If nothing else, all that staying home really helps us to crank out those words.โ €
.โ €
Recluses, raise your little emoji hands (writers and just general recluses). Do you think there's a link between being creative and bring a recluse? Do you have any weird exceptions? โ €
โ €
โ €#bookstagram #authorconfessions #authorlife

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Cold winter morning writing essentials โ„๏ธ ๐Ÿ’ป โ˜•๏ธ ๐ŸŽ‚#sallyhepworth #sallyswritingprocess #bookstagram #authorsofinstagram #author #winter #winterishere

In today's episode of #sallyswritingprocess I talk about ... being a recluse.โ €
.โ €
Yep. Iโ€™m a recluse. โ €
. โ €
Seriously. I am. Why doesn't anyone ever believe me when I say this? It's true. I'm a writer after all. We are famous for it. โ €
. โ €
Hereโ€™s the deal. Iโ€™ve never gone out dancing and never plan to. Iโ€™d take waterboarding over a stand up cocktail party. Groups of more than five people make me twitch. Generally, if i see anyone I know in public, I'll dive behind the nearest telephone pole to avoid them. For reals. Including people I like. (True story: I once saw my mum in the street and crossed the road. I called her later and told her. She was not offended in the least. She would have crossed the road too, she admitted. And we are very close.) The fact is, I come from a solid line of reclusive types. My Dad lives a two hour drive from everyone he knows, including my mum, to whom he is still happily married. We are not socially inept, in fact, some might say we are reasonably skilled in the art of conversation. We simply value solitude, comfort and familiarity. Night out dancing? ๐Ÿคข Night on the couch, with a blanket, a book and a hot chocolate? ๐ŸŽ‰ โ €
.โ €
Interesting exception: I will (and often do) happily talk in front of a packed room of strangers about books and writing. In fact, that stuff is totally MY JAM.โ €
.โ €
Now, I do know a few wildly extroverted writers so I'm not suggesting that you have to be a recluse to write. I do, however, wonder if there is a link between the recluse and the creative ... something about us needing time and space to process things? Maybe the way we absorb the world is exhausting and overwhelming? Maybe we're just a bunch of lazy intolerants who only want to engage on our own terms? Not sure. If nothing else, all that staying home really helps us to crank out those words.โ €
.โ €
Recluses, raise your little emoji hands (writers and just general recluses). Do you think there's a link between being creative and bring a recluse? Do you have any weird exceptions? โ €
โ €
โ €#bookstagram #authorconfessions #authorlife

Editing.โ €
A lot of people have misconceptions about how the editing process works. They think it works like this.โ €
โ €
1. You write the bookโ €
2. Your editor edits it.โ €
3. They publish it โ €
โ €
Do you hear that? That is the sound of all the authors laughing HYSTERICALLY. โ €
โ €
๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿ˜”โ €
โ €
Sadly no, it doesn't work like that. Here is what the actual process looks like. โ €
โ €
1. You write the book ๐Ÿ“ ,โ €
2. You rewrite the book ๐Ÿ“–,โ €
3. You repeat step 2 several (thousand) times โ €
4. You share with your first readers, your critique partners, your dog ๐Ÿถ โ €
5. You repeat step 2, several more (thousand) timesโ €
6. You share with your editor ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿปโ €
7. Your editor responds to your manuscript with suggestions ๐Ÿ˜ฑโ €
8. You repeat step 2 several more times (with alcohol ๐Ÿบ)โ €
9. You send book back to editor ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿปโ €
10. Repeat step 2 again if necessary (with alcohol ๐Ÿบ and / or valium) โ €
11. Your editor accepts book ๐Ÿ’ƒโ €
12. Book goes to copy-editor (a different editor) who makes notes on spelling and grammar, style, continuity โ€ฆ the on the line stuff, then returns it to author ๐Ÿ˜–โ €
12. Author goes through and accepts or declines copyeditors changes. Author also decides he / she hates the bookโ€™s GUTS but itโ€™s too late because IT IS GOING TO BE PUBLISHED AND SHEโ€S GOING TO LOOK LIKE A FOOL IN FRONT OF THE WORLD (Alcohol is also advisable at this stage) ๐Ÿ˜ฉ ๐Ÿบ โ €
13. Book goes back to publisherโ €
14. Book is typesetโ €
15. Author gets one last ๐Ÿ‘€ at the pages / proofread (author is just so happy she doesnโ€™t have to look at the freaking book anymore that she doesnโ€™t care its a pile of UTTER garbage ๐Ÿ’ƒโ €
16. Book is published. ๐ŸŽ‰ โ €
โ €
So that's it ... 16 steps of #sallyswritingprocess Though, Iโ€™ve been pretty conservative with the rewrite estimates. โ €
โ €
Have I missed anything (authors chime in here)? What do you think readers? Is it what you expected?

By demand: today's post of #sallyswritingprocess is Do I treat writing like a REAL job?

I used to give people major side-eye when they asked me this, but lately I have come to realise that people are genuinely confused. After all, I work alone, often in my pyjamas, and regularly from bed. There is no one (apart from, occasionally, my kids) standing over me, cracking the whip. And there is a lovely, whimsical feeling about being a writer that simply feels at odds with the word 'job.' Right?

And yet, I do treat writing novels like a real job. Here are three reasons why:

1) I don't have another job (unless you count being a mum, which, of course, is a full-time job. But I, like any other working mum, have childcare.) Last year I was working 4 days a week, and since Clementine was born I've dropped it down to 3. Next year when Clementine is older I'll go back to 4, and eventually, I'll work 5 days.

2. I have deadlines. While I still find this astonishing, people are waiting for my books. My editor, my agent, potentially even some readers. If I didn't meet those deadlines, my writing career would be short.

3. Finally, and perhaps most unspeakably (because for some reason, in the creative field ๐Ÿ’ต should never be spoken about)... writing pays me money. And as romantic as it sounds to live on reader love and ramen noodles (I actually really love ramen noodles so no shade being thrown here) I also like money. Ramen noodles ๐Ÿœ taste better in a house. With the heater on (especially today). Over to you. Do you treat your job like a REAL job?
My husband says his accountancy job is a cover for his real identity as a budding professional golfer ๐ŸŒ ๐Ÿ™„ #dadjokes

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