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#postmorerocks

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Somebody said it was #InternationalRockDay but all the posts under the hash tag are 🀘 & 🎸. Here's a gorgeous garnet mica schist from the Dice Museum. Specimen from Wrangell Island, Alaska.
#PostMoreRocks #GeologyRocks #🀘

It's Friday!!! This #FridayFold is from the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming, where highly deformed Archean gneisses are exposed. These rocks are the roots of an ancient mountain belt, formed when the N. American continent was still in it's infancy. Blocks of crust of different ages collided with one another through tectonic movements if the Earth's lithosphere, and slowly accreted together.
#PostMoreRocks #Geology #BighornMountains

Folded banded-iron formation at Dice Museum.
Banded iron formation begin as sedimentary rocks formed in the ancient oceans. They consist of layers of iron oxide minerals and quartz. Their formations are related to the build up of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere in the ancient past by the earliest photosynthetic organisms. Later, the rock was buried, metamorphosed by heat and pressure, and deformed into this folded structure. This beautifully cut and polished specimen is on display at the Dice Mineral Museum at Calvin College. The back lighting allows the red and yellow colors to done vibrantly.
#FridayFold #DiceMuseum #bandedironformation #geology #PostMoreRocks

A Dinosaur's Nightmare.
An iron meteorite showing the Widmanstatten pattern, on display at Chicago's @fieldmuseum .
The pattern is composed of two metal alloys of iron and nickle. The first, called taenite, is present when the metal is at high temperature. As the metal cools, the taenite must have a higher % of Ni to continue to be stable. The excess Fe forms a second Fe-Ni alloy called kamacite, which has a lower Ni:Fe ratio. To grow crystals of kamacite this large requires a very slow cooling rate, somewhere around a couple million years. For these materials to cool this slowly, they would have had to have been part of the core of a fairly large planetary body in the past, likely somewhere in the asteroid belt. This planetoid would have then been broken apart, likely through collisions with other asteroids, before finally hurtling through space on a collision course with Earth.
#meteorite #widmanstatten #STEMEducation #FieldMuseum #PostMoreRocks

Selenite gypsum at the Dice Museum, Calvin College. Specimen is from Chihuahua, Mexico. The clarity of these is well demonstrated by the back lighting.
#OnMondaysWePostMinerals #PostMoreRocks #MineralMonday #geologyrocks

#ThisIsWhyILookAtRocks
Yesterday there was a devastating earthquake near Mexico City, and today Hurricane Maria is causing major destruction in the Caribbean, following on the heals of Irma and others from the previous weeks. The humanitarian crisis has immediate needs that of course must be meet first.
But there are also long term ways to look at these situations, where human activities intersect with natural processes. Scientific progress plays a major role in helping us understand why these events occur and how society can act in ways that reduce the tragedy inflicted. Geoscientists of all kinds - climate scientists, geophysicists, engineering geologists, volcanologists, and many others - play a critical role in helping us understand the causes of these events, and how to build societies that are more resilient when disaster strikes. Yet climate scientists are repeatedly ridiculed in the public square. Building codes are brushed off as too much "regulation". I challenged my students in class today to take their studies seriously and apply their knowledge to the needs of the world. This is why every student should take a geology class. This is why I keep sharing Earth science photos and the stories behind them. So here's a pretty shot of the Yellowstone River valley. And just a reminder - there's a supervolcano sitting underneath it that may someday demand our attention. Wise investment now in scientific research, early warning systems, resilient buildings, and climate change mitigation will save lives in the future.
#STEMEducation #science #nature #yellowstone #nationalparkgeek #PostMoreRocks

Potholes at Johnson Shut-Ins in the East Fork Black River.
Potholes always have small stones in them, which are swirled around during high water flow and grind out the circular hole.
#geology #PostMoreRocks #potholes #johnsonshutins #MOStateParks #missouristateparks #geomorphology #andariverrunsthroughit

Fossil Meteorite with Cephalopod at the Field Museum
Most of the meteorites we have to study fell out of the sky in the not too distant past. Meteorites that feel a lot time ago, geologically speaking, are really rare. That doesn't mean that rocks from space haven't fallen to Earth throughout its history, of course; in fact old meteorite impact sites are well known in the rock record. Big meteorites often vaporize on impact, and small ones weather away quite easily at Earth's surface. There are a few, however, that have been preserved in the ancient rock record as "fossil" meteorites. This one on display at the Field Museum is preserved in a Devonian limestone. The weathering rind is pretty thick, even with the alien rock encased in another stone. Some minerals in meteorites, like the spinels, are much less susceptible to weathering and last longer than the olivine, iron, and pyroxenes that dominate chondrites. This one is also special in that it also preserves a beautiful, large cephalopod, which happened to also get fossilized very near the meteorite.
#Geology #Paleontology #Meteorites #FieldMuseum #Science #Nature ο»Ώ#PostMoreRocks

The serpent's head. #FridayFold
Last week I shared a photo of one of the "tails" of the dragon, a "famous roadcut" up in the Grenville of Ontario, CA. This is the head of the beast. The black layers are amphibolite rock that has been "mixed in" with a pinkish-gray granitic gneiss. The whole area was caught up in a shear zone, which is like a fault but much deeper in the Earth's crust, where rocks become subject to ductile processes of deformation, bending instead of breaking. The amphibolite is like a spaghetti noodle getting wound up on a spinning fork, folded back and forth over itself many, many times. At this time, the Grenville Mountains had formed, a chain of thickened crust that would have rivaled the modern day Himalayas. These rocks were somewhere on the order of 30 km deep at that time, so the Grenville Terrane of Eastern Canada gives geologists a look into what the deep parts of mountain belts are like.
#geologyrocks #tectonics #grenvilleprovince #ohrocks #postmorerocks #heretherebedragons #GeologicStructure

MOST RECENT

#ThisIsWhyILookAtRocks
Yesterday there was a devastating earthquake near Mexico City, and today Hurricane Maria is causing major destruction in the Caribbean, following on the heals of Irma and others from the previous weeks. The humanitarian crisis has immediate needs that of course must be meet first.
But there are also long term ways to look at these situations, where human activities intersect with natural processes. Scientific progress plays a major role in helping us understand why these events occur and how society can act in ways that reduce the tragedy inflicted. Geoscientists of all kinds - climate scientists, geophysicists, engineering geologists, volcanologists, and many others - play a critical role in helping us understand the causes of these events, and how to build societies that are more resilient when disaster strikes. Yet climate scientists are repeatedly ridiculed in the public square. Building codes are brushed off as too much "regulation". I challenged my students in class today to take their studies seriously and apply their knowledge to the needs of the world. This is why every student should take a geology class. This is why I keep sharing Earth science photos and the stories behind them. So here's a pretty shot of the Yellowstone River valley. And just a reminder - there's a supervolcano sitting underneath it that may someday demand our attention. Wise investment now in scientific research, early warning systems, resilient buildings, and climate change mitigation will save lives in the future.
#STEMEducation #science #nature #yellowstone #nationalparkgeek #PostMoreRocks

A Dinosaur's Nightmare.
An iron meteorite showing the Widmanstatten pattern, on display at Chicago's @fieldmuseum .
The pattern is composed of two metal alloys of iron and nickle. The first, called taenite, is present when the metal is at high temperature. As the metal cools, the taenite must have a higher % of Ni to continue to be stable. The excess Fe forms a second Fe-Ni alloy called kamacite, which has a lower Ni:Fe ratio. To grow crystals of kamacite this large requires a very slow cooling rate, somewhere around a couple million years. For these materials to cool this slowly, they would have had to have been part of the core of a fairly large planetary body in the past, likely somewhere in the asteroid belt. This planetoid would have then been broken apart, likely through collisions with other asteroids, before finally hurtling through space on a collision course with Earth.
#meteorite #widmanstatten #STEMEducation #FieldMuseum #PostMoreRocks

really pretty rocks, a beautiful lake, and once again smoke @ Lake McDonald, Glacier NP πŸ™Œ #lookslikepetkibble #foramtravels #glaciernationalpark #glacier #np #usa #warmmilk #lakemcdonald #PostMoreRocks #geology

oh boy I do love me some fossilized ripples @ moraine lake πŸ˜πŸ‘Œ #foramtravels #morainelake #ripples #banff #travelalberta #getrekt #warmmilk #geologenunterwegs #geology #PostMoreRocks #rock #fossil

The Grand Tetons behind the Moulton Barn. The Tetons are some of the youngest mountains in the greater Rocky Mountain chain. They were uplifted in the last 10 million years due to motion on the Teton fault, a normal fault that runs 44 miles along the east side of the Tetons. The fault is still active, moving an average of ~1.3 mm/year. Total displacement has so far reached about 30,000'. The Tetons are also home to a single remaining glacier, seen here on the left side nestled between the three large peaks.
#mygtnp #GrandTetonNPS #Geology #FindYourPark #tetonglacier #tetonfault #mygrandteton

Fluorescent minerals at the Dice Museum, Calvin College. Fluorescence occurs when ultraviolet light, which is invisible to the human eye, strikes a mineral, is absorbed, and then the light is remitted as visible light. Visible light, such as the green and orange colors seen in these specimens, has much longer wavelengths than ultraviolet light. The minerals themselves are emitting this light, it is not reflected light; this difference is what gives them a glowing appearance.
#minerals #geology #dicemuseum #fluorescence #postmorerocks #onmondayswepostminerals

Selenite gypsum at the Dice Museum, Calvin College. Specimen is from Chihuahua, Mexico. The clarity of these is well demonstrated by the back lighting.
#OnMondaysWePostMinerals #PostMoreRocks #MineralMonday #geologyrocks

Somebody said it was #InternationalRockDay but all the posts under the hash tag are 🀘 & 🎸. Here's a gorgeous garnet mica schist from the Dice Museum. Specimen from Wrangell Island, Alaska.
#PostMoreRocks #GeologyRocks #🀘

It's Friday!!! This #FridayFold is from the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming, where highly deformed Archean gneisses are exposed. These rocks are the roots of an ancient mountain belt, formed when the N. American continent was still in it's infancy. Blocks of crust of different ages collided with one another through tectonic movements if the Earth's lithosphere, and slowly accreted together.
#PostMoreRocks #Geology #BighornMountains

Close-up shot of bedding-cleavage relationship in Wilhite slate, part of the Proterozoic Walden Creek Group in the Western Blue Ridge.
There are two distinct planes throughout these rocks - the more shallow dipping one is the bedding, which is the original layering formed when these rocks were originally laid down as sedimentary units. That surface is now folded back and forth, although this is not seen in this photo. Here I focused on a single limb of the fold. The second planar surface is the cleavage - this plane is not folded. This penetrative fabric formed due to compressive tectonic stress much later, during the first phase of mountain building in the Southern Appalachians. It is related to the folding, oriented like a bisecting plane in the center of the folds. Geostudents - which direction is the hinge of the anticline, and are these rocks upright or overturned?
A day early and a bit indirect for this week's #FridayFold. ☺️ #GeologicStructure #BlueRidge #PostMoreRocks #scienceeducation #tectonics

The serpent's head. #FridayFold
Last week I shared a photo of one of the "tails" of the dragon, a "famous roadcut" up in the Grenville of Ontario, CA. This is the head of the beast. The black layers are amphibolite rock that has been "mixed in" with a pinkish-gray granitic gneiss. The whole area was caught up in a shear zone, which is like a fault but much deeper in the Earth's crust, where rocks become subject to ductile processes of deformation, bending instead of breaking. The amphibolite is like a spaghetti noodle getting wound up on a spinning fork, folded back and forth over itself many, many times. At this time, the Grenville Mountains had formed, a chain of thickened crust that would have rivaled the modern day Himalayas. These rocks were somewhere on the order of 30 km deep at that time, so the Grenville Terrane of Eastern Canada gives geologists a look into what the deep parts of mountain belts are like.
#geologyrocks #tectonics #grenvilleprovince #ohrocks #postmorerocks #heretherebedragons #GeologicStructure

This week's #waterfallwednesday flows in from Great Smoky Mountains National Park. β€’β€’β€’β€’β€’
Thanks to @profcarriganonu for the geology of GSMNP. ・・・
The subject of this photo is the Great Smoky Thrust Fault, the most significant fault in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Strongly cleaved Neoproterozoic phyllites lie on top of the Ordovician Knox limestone. This is an Alleghanian structure, active during the Late Carboniferous to early Permian, when Africa and N. America collided to form the supercontinent Pangea at the end of the Paleozoic Era. Here, in Great Smoky Mountain National Park, the fault is visible behind a small waterfall at White Oak Sink, where a small creek falls over the contact and enters a cave in the limestone below. This photo was taken a few years ago; this area is now restricted to human activity in order to protect the Smoky Mountain bat populations from the disease called White Nose Syndrome. This photo was also selected as the Earth Science Picture of the Day in May, 2014.
#greatsmokymountains #friendsofthesmokies #GSMNP #WhiteNoseSyndrome #WhiteOakSink #thrustfault #geology #waterfallsfordays #nature_waterfalls #longexposure_shots #southernappalachians #postmorerocks
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#nationalparkgeek

The subject of this photo is the Great Smoky Thrust Fault, the most significant fault in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Strongly cleaved Neoproterozoic phyllites lie on top of the Ordovician Knox limestone. This is an Alleghanian structure, active during the Late Carboniferous to early Permian, when Africa and N. America collided to form the supercontinent Pangea at the end of the Paleozoic Era. Here, in Great Smoky Mountain National Park, the fault is visible behind a small waterfall at White Oak Sink, where a small creek falls over the contact and enters a cave in the limestone below. This photo was taken a few years ago; this area is now restricted to human activity in order to protect the Smoky Mountain bat populations from the disease called White Nose Syndrome. This photo was also selected as the Earth Science Picture of the Day in May, 2014.
#greatsmokymountains #friendsofthesmokies #GSMNP #WhiteNoseSyndrome #WhiteOakSink #thrustfault #geology #waterfallsfordays #nature_waterfalls #longexposure_shots #southernappalachians #postmorerocks

Mina Sauk Falls, just off of Taum Sauk Mtn and a short hike down from the MO high point. The water falls over the 1.5 Ga Precambrian rhyolites that dominate the bedrock of this region.
#geologyrocks #waterfalls #longexposure #minasaukfalls #taumsaukmountain #MOStateParks #rhyolite #geologyfieldtrip #waterfallsfordays

Folded banded-iron formation at Dice Museum.
Banded iron formation begin as sedimentary rocks formed in the ancient oceans. They consist of layers of iron oxide minerals and quartz. Their formations are related to the build up of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere in the ancient past by the earliest photosynthetic organisms. Later, the rock was buried, metamorphosed by heat and pressure, and deformed into this folded structure. This beautifully cut and polished specimen is on display at the Dice Mineral Museum at Calvin College. The back lighting allows the red and yellow colors to done vibrantly.
#FridayFold #DiceMuseum #bandedironformation #geology #PostMoreRocks

Finally got around to cataloging my new pieces and figured I'd share! Starting from the left:

1)Scleractinian Coral from Virginia Beach, Va (Also the first fossil I've ever personally found!)
2) Phyllite (metallic rock in the center), produced through low to medium grade metamorphism of Slate, found near James River State Park, Va.
3) Red quartzite, also found near James River State Park, Va.
4) Mudstone from Ireland!
Note: Only the coral sample was collected by me! Thank you @juliekolleene @kcurl89 and @lindzatkins for thinking of me and picking these up 😁

#Geology #PostMoreRocks

Potholes at Johnson Shut-Ins in the East Fork Black River.
Potholes always have small stones in them, which are swirled around during high water flow and grind out the circular hole.
#geology #PostMoreRocks #potholes #johnsonshutins #MOStateParks #missouristateparks #geomorphology #andariverrunsthroughit

A trio of geos on Elephant Rocks.
Last week I took my petrology class to SE MO to the St. Francois Mtns. to see the igneous rocks - mostly alkalic granites and rhyolites, and diabase dikes. I love my job teaching these future scientists. Although the weather was crummy, we still got to see some great stuff. Then on Saturday evening we held a retirement dinner for one of my colleagues who is finally hanging up the old rock hammer after 50 years!! Got to honor his legacy, and then enjoyed catching up with some old alums who had made the trip back to campus. All in all, being a professor isn't bad if you can stand all the committee meetings! πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ #geology #StFrancoisMountains #elephantrocks #science #nature #STEMCareers

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