#notobill128

MOST RECENT

Due to recent headlines about a slightly fabricated story about a "pit bull" type dog being sexually abused and left for dead in LA, we thought it might be best to resurface 2 previous #BSLBytes we did that talk about the concept of making up stories based off assumptions to "raise awareness". Stories aside, our hearts go out to this pup who passed away. But focusing on the real cause of death, and the reasons in which the pup did not receive the care it needed will be more successful in preventing stories like this. RIP little one.
https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Pit-Bull-Sexually-Abused-South-Los-Angeles-491058901.html --- PART 1

Notch was found with wounds on his body consistent with dog fight injuries. He has scars on his head and neck that indicate previous bites. His teeth are nubs, and he’s very nervous around dogs he doesn’t know. With no other information about him, some might assume he was a “bait dog” or otherwise involved in dog fighting. Nothing could be further from the truth. He lived in a loving home, albeit in an area with loose intact male dogs, and they did what intact male dogs do when roaming loose. They fought. As for his teeth? He had a bad habit of picking up and chewing on rocks if he didn't have a selection of ChuckIts in the vicinity.

We started talking about the “bait dog” concept last week. Despite the widespread use of the term and the social media prevalence of “bait dogs”, there’s little evidence that “bait dogs” are a thing, at least where professional dog fighting is concerned.

And yet social media channels and adoptable dog posts are rife with “bait dogs”. The overwhelming majority of them are not dogs seized from fighting rings. In fact, when is the last time you’ve seen a fighting ring bust where “bait dogs” were removed from the premises? Most are fighting and/or breeding dogs, and these dogs are also victims of abuse, but rarely get the same number of shares or drama as "bait dog" stories do.

Continued below

When Chantelle first met Mr. Magoo, he was in pretty rough physical shape. He had next to no hair, open sores everywhere, he stunk like death, and his body was infested with mange. His ears were noticeable only because of how poorly the crop was done. Chantelle’s mom, already hesitant about adding this dog to her family, asked why his ears looked that way. The lady doing the meet and greet chimed in suggesting that it was because he was a possible "bait dog". Chantelle knew what the word meant but her mom had no idea – imagine how awkward it was trying to explain to her already nervous mother why adopting a “bait dog” was a good idea. “We bought into this for a little bit,” remembers Chantelle, “and I can say with certainty that these two misused words ‘bait dog’ influenced the way Magoo was treated and how we saw him. Eventually, through social media, we found the couple who removed him from the environment he was in and we spoke to the rescue who brought him here to Calgary. We found out that he was not a victim of dog fighting, but instead a victim of poverty, a lack of resources, and neglect. Over the years, I learned something even more important – his past is interesting to know, but it doesn’t matter or define who he is.” We previously discussed the propensity of rescues and shelters to speculate that scarred, injured, or dog-selective dogs are “bait dogs”. Before that we looked at the paucity of evidence showing that “bait dogs” arent even a thing in professional dog fighting operations. Today we talk about how the label may actually harm the dog it’s trying to drum up empathy for.

By applying a “bait dog” label, we are marketing this dog as a victim, and encouraging an adoption out of pity rather than suitability to the home. Because of its imagined past, the owners may feel inclined to write off behaviour issues. Have you ever seen someone with a misbehaving dog try to explain the behaviour along the lines of, “It’s not his fault. He’s a rescue!”? ...... Continued in comments

Repost from @justice_for_bullies using @RepostRegramApp - We have asked our board members to pick their favorite #BSLbytes.
Here is one of Susan and Chantelle's favourite bytes. --- Breed specific legislation isn’t just ineffective and unfair: it’s expensive.
BSL communities rarely calculate and publicize the costs associated with enforcing BSL, but there’s a case study of Prince George County, Maryland, that is quite illuminating. “Pit bulls”, American Pit Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, and American Staffordshire Terriers have been banned there since 1997, and in 2003 the county authorized the “Vicious Animal Task Force” to examine the results of the ban and the cost associated to the confiscation, maintenance and disposal of “pit bull” type dogs.
The financial impacts of the ban are astounding.
The estimated cost to the county for housing a “pit bull” type dog throughout an entire year process was estimated at $68,000, or $186 a day.
The cost to the Animal Management Division for maintenance of “pit bull” type dogs during the fiscal year of 2001-2002 was estimated at $560,000. It is suggested that these costs are significantly higher when you factor in other variables such as utilities, manpower, overtime, and the expenditures of the county police departments. Multiply this over a 10 year period and the cost to enforce ineffective animal control measures is estimated at $5.6 million dollars. That is $5.6 million tax payer dollars in support of a law that does not achieve public safety and kills innocent family pets and pets in need of a home.
The ban has also shown a significant loss in revenue to the county as fewer dog shows and exhibitions are taking place. It is estimated that the loss in revenue is approximately $1.5 million a year, affecting hotels, fuel stations, veterinarians, pet supply stores, restaurants, retail stores and other businesses.

Time and money would be better spent addressing irresponsible dog owners, enforcing breed neutral bylaws, providing educational programs for the public, and responding to actual dangerous dogs incidents.
#endBSL #notoBill128 #Canada150 #BSLbytes --- Source and further reading:
https://animal

We have asked our board members to pick their favorite #BSLbytes.
Here is one of Susan and Chantelle's favourite bytes. --- Breed specific legislation isn’t just ineffective and unfair: it’s expensive.
BSL communities rarely calculate and publicize the costs associated with enforcing BSL, but there’s a case study of Prince George County, Maryland, that is quite illuminating. “Pit bulls”, American Pit Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, and American Staffordshire Terriers have been banned there since 1997, and in 2003 the county authorized the “Vicious Animal Task Force” to examine the results of the ban and the cost associated to the confiscation, maintenance and disposal of “pit bull” type dogs.
The financial impacts of the ban are astounding.
The estimated cost to the county for housing a “pit bull” type dog throughout an entire year process was estimated at $68,000, or $186 a day.
The cost to the Animal Management Division for maintenance of “pit bull” type dogs during the fiscal year of 2001-2002 was estimated at $560,000. It is suggested that these costs are significantly higher when you factor in other variables such as utilities, manpower, overtime, and the expenditures of the county police departments. Multiply this over a 10 year period and the cost to enforce ineffective animal control measures is estimated at $5.6 million dollars. That is $5.6 million tax payer dollars in support of a law that does not achieve public safety and kills innocent family pets and pets in need of a home.
The ban has also shown a significant loss in revenue to the county as fewer dog shows and exhibitions are taking place. It is estimated that the loss in revenue is approximately $1.5 million a year, affecting hotels, fuel stations, veterinarians, pet supply stores, restaurants, retail stores and other businesses.

Time and money would be better spent addressing irresponsible dog owners, enforcing breed neutral bylaws, providing educational programs for the public, and responding to actual dangerous dogs incidents.
#endBSL #notoBill128 #Canada150 #BSLbytes --- Source and further reading:
https://animalfarmfoundation.blog/2015/05/13/prince-georg

Today marks 27 years since the UK enacted some of the most barbaric dog legislation we have seen!
27 years of death, heartache, sorrow, sadness and communities that are no more safer than they were before the ban. In fact, dog bites and dog bite related fatalities have increased.

Today we will talk about one of the oldest and largest breed bans in the world: the Dangerous Dog Act of the United Kingdom, enacted in 1991. "In the UK, it’s against the law to own certain types of dogs:
Pit Bull Terrier
Japanese Tosa
Dogo Argentino
Fila Brasileiro

Whether your dog is a banned type depends solely on visual identification. If your dog has physical characteristics of a banned type, it will be considered a banned type.
It’s also against the law to:
sell a banned dog
abandon a banned dog
give away a banned dog
breed from a banned dog

If you have a banned dog, the police or local council dog warden can take it away and keep it, whether or not there are complaints or behaviour problems. The police may need permission from a court to do this.
If your dog is in:
a public place, the police don’t need a warrant
a private place, the police must get a warrant
a private place and the police have a warrant for something else (like a drug search), they can seize your dog.

A police or council dog expert will judge what type of dog you have and whether it is (or could be) a danger to the public. Your dog will then either be released or impounded in a kennel while the police or council applies to a court. You’re not allowed to visit your dog while you wait for the court decision.

It’s your responsibility to prove your dog is not a banned type. f you prove this, the court will order the dog to be returned to you. If you can’t prove it (or you plead guilty), you’ll be convicted of a crime.

You can get an unlimited fine or be sent to prison for up to 6 months (or both) for having a banned dog against the law. Your dog will also be destroyed.

If your dog is deemed to be a banned breed but the court believes it’s not a danger to the public, it may put it on the IED and let you keep it. You’ll be given a Certificate of Exemption. This is valid for the life of the dog.

We have asked our board members to pick their favorite #BSLbytes and will be sharing them over the next 3 months.

Here is one of Nate's top picks:

We are opposed to mandatory muzzle laws based on breed, but we do not oppose muzzles themselves. Muzzles can be an effective training and management tool. While some owners balk at using them because of the reaction of others, we support the efforts of groups like The The Muzzle Up Project to remove stigma around the gear.

Muzzles should be properly fitted and of the “basket” variety to allow the dog to pant and drink. Some people feel that grooming/fabric muzzles are less intimidating but they are not meant for a walk – imagine having your jaw forced closed for more than a couple minutes at a time! There are also some fun conditioning exercises you can do with your pup to associate the muzzle with good things. Check out the Muzzle Up Project page and talk to an R+ trainer if you think a muzzle might be a good tool for your training toolbox.

If you see a muzzled dog on the street, don’t be too quick to assume they are dangerous. Assume they have an owner who is brave and responsible enough to take steps to keep them safe. A dog might be wearing the muzzle because he eats dangerous things off the ground, because he is fearful of people/dogs/bikes, because he gets overly excitable and mouthy, because the handler can’t trust other people to provide a respectful berth of space, because of BSL, or because of many other reasons.

We recommend leaving a respectful amount of space in case the dog is reactive (as you should with any dog you don't know), but try making friendly eye contact and smiling at the owner. If they respond and indicate that their dog is friendly, maybe they would even like to say hello. Take Jackson, pictured below. He adores people. Like really, really, REALLY adores people. He also has dog friends but if a strange dog rushes up to him uninvited, he panics and may feel the need to defend himself. In areas where this might happen (like the hallways in his condo), his mom elects to muzzle him.

Continued in comments... “I have been an Animal Control Officer for seven years. When I first started in the field, breed-specific legislation was in effect in the city where I worked. Bully breed type dogs were listed as 'vicious dogs' simply based on their breed, or more accurately, what we thought their breed might be. As ACOs, we were supposed to tell owners of bully breed type dogs that they had to muzzle their dog, walk their dog on a short leash, not allow their dog into off-leash areas, etc. And if they didn’t adhere to those restrictions, they could receive a fine.

It never sat right with me, having to stop an owner of a bully breed dog who was walking nicely on leash, not bothering anybody, just because they didn’t have a muzzle on. It seemed like a misallocation of resources, in a department that never seems to have enough. We should have been spending more time patrolling and reminding all dog owners to be responsible, not just targeting a few based on looks alone.

Ironically, this job is where I came to meet and appreciate a lot of different bully breed dogs. As we also run the city shelter, we are responsible for adopting out dogs. The more dogs I met, the more I realized each dog was truly an individual.

It was pretty rare that we would know for sure the breed of a dog that ended up in our shelter, since many of them were strays. If it had a blocky head and a smooth short coat, it got the 'pit bull' label. Many of these 'vicious' dogs were goofy, friendly, playful, and were easy to adopt out. I felt like such a hypocrite: our bylaw said these dogs needed to be muzzled for public safety, and yet, we were confident adopting many of these dogs into families with children or other pets. How could that be? Since we would never knowingly place an unsafe dog for adoption, we were admitting our own bylaw was faulty.

Have you ever seen reports of dog-on-dog aggression with a quote to the effect of, “next time it will be a child?” It seems to be a staple in news reporting, and it’s problematic: dog-to-dog aggression does not equal dog-to-human aggression.

Let’s be clear. If a dog injures another dog, that’s a problem. Some of these news stories have tragic outcomes and they should be treated as the serious animal control issue that it is. But if a dog fights or attacks another dog, does that necessarily mean that it would do the same to a small human? We asked Shelagh Begg, head trainer at Dizine Canine Pet Dog Training, for some insight into this. “When we think of dogs being aggressive, we imagine barking, lunging, attacking, fighting, biting and a variety of other actions. But why do dogs display these actions? In most cases, when dogs are being aggressive it’s usually a fear response to an external stimulus. For example, if a dog is afraid of another dog, it may bark and lunge if on leash (and if this is the case we refer to this as leash aggression, as opposed to dog aggression). If a dog bites another dog, again, it’s likely because the threat, or the perceived threat, of danger was imminent and the threat (the other dog) was not going away.
Many dog-on-dog attacks reported in the media are more often than not sensationalized, making the incident sound more dramatic than it probably was. And in several of these reports, they quote someone saying “it’s just a matter of time before that dog attacks a child," or “there are children in the neighbourhood," leading us to believe that if this dog attacked another dog, it would only be a matter of time before that same dog would attack a person.
Wrong.

Dog behaviour, put simply, isn’t that black and white. But most importantly, dogs know the difference between dogs and children. We also need to remember, dogs don’t seek out conflict, in fact, they often do everything they can to avoid it. Rarely do we see a dog attacking another dog without provocation, or in the absence of a trigger (territory, resource, sexual status, etc.).

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #endbslwinnipeg #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #endbslwinnipeg #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #endbslwinnipeg #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #endbslwinnipeg #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Today, July 11, 2018 is Lennox's 6th year anniversary of his death R.I.P.
Lennox was killed on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of BSL. Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. 💔🐾 https://m.facebook.com/endbslmanitoba/

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #wearealllennox #IAMLENNOX2018 #Lennox #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #notobill128 #stopbill128 #endbslwinnipeg #mycanadaincludesalldogs🇨🇦

Lennox's 6 year anniversary of his death R.I.P. is approaching July 11, 2018.

Lennox died on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of breed-specific legislation (BSL). Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. "We Are All Lennox" #WeAreAllLennox #IAMLENNOX2018

I AM LENNOX 2018 — Lennox's story changed my life. I participated from the beginning to set Lennox free, there we're so many advocates, famous people, petitions, news stories plus the "I AM LENNOX" internet campaign, leather bracelets sold with his name, to drum up funds for his family's lawyers fees to free Lennox. It was the most horrific heart breaking story. I could not stop thinking about Lennox, ripped from his family, alone, scared and getting sick in that cold dark cell, no toys or outside walks, no love or human touch from anyone. Those he loved kept away. Being a dog Lennox never knew why he was left alone abandoned. It still is too disturbing for me to re-live, yet we must. Lennox's memory lives on to END BSL. Lennox's story alone should of been the end to BSL, yet here we are 2018 and BSL is growing in Canada 🇨🇦. Backwards society especially when Canada has the Calgary breed neutral animal bylaw to follow as a proven success.

End BSL Manitoba

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #endbslwinnipeg #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #endbslontario #standingstrongforbreedneutrallaws #notobill128 #mycanadaincludesalldogs #AllDogsMatter #AllDogsAreIndividuals @animalfarmfoundation @mayorbrianbowman

Lennox's 6 year anniversary of his death R.I.P. is approaching July 11, 2018.

Lennox died on July 11th 2012. He taught thousands about the heartbreak of breed-specific legislation (BSL). Each year we will honor and remember Lennox, with the saddest of hearts. "We Are All Lennox" #WeAreAllLennox #IAMLENNOX2018

I AM LENNOX 2018 — Lennox's story changed my life. I participated from the beginning to set Lennox free, there we're so many advocates, famous people, petitions, news stories plus the "I AM LENNOX" internet campaign, leather bracelets sold with his name, to drum up funds for his family's lawyers fees to free Lennox. It was the most horrific heart breaking story. I could not stop thinking about Lennox, ripped from his family, alone, scared and getting sick in that cold dark cell, no toys or outside walks, no love or human touch from anyone. Those he loved kept away. Being a dog Lennox never knew why he was left alone abandoned. It still is too disturbing for me to re-live, yet we must. Lennox's memory lives on to END BSL. Lennox's story alone should of been the end to BSL, yet here we are 2018 and BSL is growing in Canada 🇨🇦. Backwards society especially when Canada has the Calgary breed neutral animal bylaw to follow as a proven success.

End BSL Manitoba

#endbsl #stopbsl #Endbslmanitoba #endbslwinnipeg #Canada150 #bslbytes #endbslworldwide #endbslontario #standingstrongforbreedneutrallaws #notobill128 #mycanadaincludesalldogs #AllDogsMatter #AllDogsAreIndividuals @mayorbrianbowman @animalfarmfoundation

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