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WHAM 💥 A camera on NASA satellite survives meteoroid hit -- On Oct.13, 2014 something very strange happened to the camera aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), which normally produces beautifully clear images of the lunar surface, produced an image that was wild and jittery. From the sudden and jagged pattern apparent in the image, the LROC team determined that the camera must have been hit by a tiny meteoroid, a small natural object in space.
Credit: NASA/GoddardLRO #moon #nasagoddard #meteoroid #space #science

A Whole New Jupiter -- Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science

Gulf of Alaska - The spring bloom in the Gulf of Alaska was well underway on April 12, 2017, when the Aqua/MODIS and Suomi-NPP/VIIRS data from which the above image was created were collected.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/NPP #nasagoddard #Earth #science #Alaska

The new GOES-16 satellite reveals the beauty and wonder of Earth from an equatorial view approximately 22,300 miles high.
Credit: NOAA/NASA #earth #nasagoddard

Hubble detects "kamikaze" comets plunging into a young star, 95 light-years from Earth.

This illustration shows several comets speeding across a vast protoplanetary disk of gas and dust and heading straight for the youthful, central star. These "kamikaze" comets will eventually plunge into the star and vaporize. The comets are too small to photograph, but their gaseous spectral "fingerprints" on the star's light were detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The gravitational influence of a suspected Jupiter-sized planet in the foreground may have catapulted the comets into the star. This star, called HD 172555, represents the third extrasolar system where astronomers have detected doomed, wayward comets. The star resides 95 light-years from Earth.

Read more: http://go.nasa.gov/2hZASqa

Credits: NASA, ESA, A. Feild and G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard

Critical extra time that could help protect astronauts from space weather identified by NASA scientist

Our constantly-changing sun sometimes erupts with bursts of light, solar material, or ultra-fast energized particles — collectively, these events contribute to space weather. In a study published Jan. 30, 2017, in Space Weather, scientists from NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, or NCAR, in Boulder, Colorado, have shown that the warning signs of one type of space weather event can be detected tens of minutes earlier than with current forecasting techniques – critical extra time that could help protect astronauts in space.

Earth’s magnetic field and atmosphere protect us on the ground from most of the harmful effects of space weather, but astronauts in low-Earth orbit — or even, one day, in interplanetary space — are more exposed to space weather, including bursts of fast-moving particles called solar energetic particles, or SEPs.

This composite image shows a coronal mass ejection, a type of space weather linked to solar energetic particles, as seen from two space-based solar observatories and one ground-based instrument. The image in gold is from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, the image in blue is from the Manua Loa Solar Observatory’s K-Cor coronagraph, and the image in red is from ESA and NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.

Credits: NASA/ESA/SOHO/SDO/Joy Ng and MLSO/K-Cor #nasagoddard #sun #space #science

NASA’s MAVEN Mission Observes Ups and Downs of Water Escape from Mars
After investigating the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet for a full Martian year, NASA’s MAVEN mission has determined that the escaping water does not always go gently into space.

Sophisticated measurements made by a suite of instruments on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, spacecraft revealed the ups and downs of hydrogen escape – and therefore water loss. The escape rate peaked when Mars was at its closest point to the sun and dropped off when the planet was farthest from the sun. The rate of loss varied dramatically overall, with 10 times more hydrogen escaping at the maximum. “MAVEN is giving us unprecedented detail about hydrogen escape from the upper atmosphere of Mars, and this is crucial for helping us figure out the total amount of water lost over billions of years,” said Ali Rahmati, a MAVEN team member at the University of California at Berkeley who analyzed data from two of the spacecraft’s instruments.

Hydrogen in Mars’ upper atmosphere comes from water vapor in the lower atmosphere. An atmospheric water molecule can be broken apart by sunlight, releasing the two hydrogen atoms from the oxygen atom that they had been bound to. Several processes at work in Mars’ upper atmosphere may then act on the hydrogen, leading to its escape.

Credit: NASA #nasagoddard #mars #space #planet

Earth Eclipses the Sun

Twice a year, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, has an eclipse season — a weeks-long period in which Earth blocks SDO’s view of the sun for part of each day. This footage captured by SDO on Feb. 15, 2017, shows one such eclipse. Earth’s edge appears fuzzy, rather than crisp, because the sun’s light is able to shine through Earth’s atmosphere in some places. These images were captured in wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, which is typically invisible to our eyes, but is colorized here in gold.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #nasagoddard #sun #earth #space #science

The sun emitted a trio of mid-level solar flares on April 2-3, 2017. The first peaked at 4:02 a.m. EDT on April 2, the second peaked at 4:33 p.m. EDT on April 2, and the third peaked at 10:29 a.m. EDT on April 3. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of the three events. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

Caption: NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a solar flare peaking at 10:29 a.m. EDT on April 3, 2017, as seen in the bright flash near the sun’s upper right edge. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares and which is typically colorized in teal.

Credits: NASA/SDO #nasagoddard #sun #sdo #flare

MOST RECENT

"Space exploration is a force of nature unto itself that no other force in society can rival." #neildegrassetyson #NASA #NASAGoddard #spaceflightcenter #ExploreGoddard #behindthescenes #awe

"GETTING MISTY
Sitting on a rolling platform, the space shuttle Challenger emerges from the mist at Kennedy Space Center in Florida as it heads toward the launch pad, just visible in the distance, in November 1982. Challenger lifted off on its maiden voyage in April 1983 for the sixth shuttle mission.

When the space shuttle Atlantis lands on Thursday, it will wrap up STS-135, the final shuttle mission in the U.S. program's 30-year history. This shot is among those chosen by National Geographic photo editors as the most unforgettable pictures from the entire shuttle program." #astronautphotography #BeyondOurUniverse #spaceshuttle #spaceshuttlecrew #spaceshuttleprogram #nasa #nasagram #nasabeyond #astronomy #astronaut #astronauts #internationalspacestation #universetoday #oursolarsystem #outerspace #nightsky #nightscaper #starrynight #kennedyspacecenter #nasagoddard #nasaglenn #johnsonspacecenter #nasalangley #spaceshuttlechallenger #cosmos #spacephoto Credit: NatGeo & NASA

WHAM 💥 A camera on NASA satellite survives meteoroid hit -- On Oct.13, 2014 something very strange happened to the camera aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), which normally produces beautifully clear images of the lunar surface, produced an image that was wild and jittery. From the sudden and jagged pattern apparent in the image, the LROC team determined that the camera must have been hit by a tiny meteoroid, a small natural object in space.
Credit: NASA/GoddardLRO #moon #nasagoddard #meteoroid #space #science

Take that, unicorns. #Jupiter Repost @nasagoddard
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A Whole New Jupiter -- Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science

Gigantic Wave Discovered in Perseus Galaxy Cluster

Combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio observations and computer simulations, an international team of scientists has discovered a vast wave of hot gas in the nearby Perseus galaxy cluster. Spanning some 200,000 light-years, the wave is about twice the size of our own Milky Way galaxy.

The researchers say the wave formed billions of years ago, after a small galaxy cluster grazed Perseus and caused its vast supply of gas to slosh around an enormous volume of space. "Perseus is one of the most massive nearby clusters and the brightest one in X-rays, so Chandra data provide us with unparalleled detail," said lead scientist Stephen Walker at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "The wave we've identified is associated with the flyby of a smaller cluster, which shows that the merger activity that produced these giant structures is still ongoing." Read more at nasa.gov

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Stephen Walker #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa #astronomy #astronomia

یک مشتری کاملا جدید!

نتایج علمی اولیه از ماموریت فضاپیمای جونوِ ناسا به مشتری. به تصویر کشیدن بزرگترین سیاره در منظومه شمسی ما در یک جمع بندی کلی: غول پیکر،با دنیایی سرکش،با توفان قطبی به اندازه زمین!،غوطه وری سیستم های توفانی که به قلب این غول گازی سفر عمیقی می کنند،میدان مغناطیسی برآمده که ممکن است نشان دهد از آنچه قبلا تصور می شد نزدیکتر به سطح سیاره ایجاد شده است.

این تصویر قطب جنوب مشتری را نشان می دهد،همانطور که از طریق فضاپیمای جونو ناسا از ارتفاع (52000 هزار کیلومتری) دیدیم ویژیگی های بیضی شکل گردباد هستند،گردبادهایی با قطر 1000 کیلومتر و بیشتر. تصاویر متعدد گرفته شده توسط دوربین جونو در سه مدار مجزا ترکیب شدند برای نشان دادن تمام مناطق در نور روز،بهبود رنگ یافته و برجسته نمایی شده.

باید بگوییم که ما به شدت متعجب و متحیر شدیم که چگونه گردبادی به اندازه زمین بر قطب مشتری وجود دارد و پیکره سیاره پایدار است! سوال دیگر این است که چرا قطب شمال مشتری مانند قطب جنوب نیست؟

نکته:رنگ های آبی که بر برجی بلند و بالاآمده بر اثر توفان و ابرها مشاهده می کنید به طور قطع از آب و یا یخ و آمونیاک تشکیل شده اند. **این پست، پست صفحه رسمی ناسا و با ترجمه کامل تر از مطلب وب سایت ناسا می باشد.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science

#Repost @nasagoddard
・・・
A Whole New Jupiter -- Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science

@Regrann from @nasagoddard - A Whole New Jupiter -- Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science - #regrann

@Regrann from @nasagoddard - A Whole New Jupiter -- Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles #nasagoddard #space #Jupiter #science - #regrann

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