#muscleoftheweek

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#MuscleOfTheWeek
For this week I thought we would take a look at the forearm muscles. As you can see from the picture, there are a lot of muscles in a small area, so when we use our forearms in work and in our hobbies, it’s no wonder tightness can set in. .
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Getting to know our bodies can help us to reduce problems like tension, tightness and spasms. .
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Tight forearms? Follow this weeks #stretchoftheweek .
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#muscle #muscleup #muscleknowledge #muscles #muscleandfitness #musclescience #musclespasms #musclestrong #knowyourmuscles #knowyourbody #knowyourself #forearm #forearmstrength #forearmworkout #weeklyinfo #yourbodyisatemple #treatyourselfright #treatyourselfwell #loveyourself #loveyourbodyseries #loveyourbody #dbmassage #fleethampshire #hampshire #farnborough #farnham #farnhamsurrey #surreylife

Had a kick ass arm day today!! Feelin uber pumped!! Why can't this last! 🤠💥 #💪 #Gunz #muscle #gymlife #trainhard #muscleoftheday #muscleoftheweek

Suffering with low back pain is no fun, but sometimes it can be due to imbalances in our #muscles - Our #muscleoftheweek is the #psoasmajor - when tight it can give hip or back pain or even in some cases make your tummy stick out more! An mechanical issue when it is tight is that it can pull the spine forward.
Visit our website to book an assessment with us if you have #lowbackpain - www.connectivechiropractic.co.uk

#EmpoweringWellbeing #chiropractic #physicalwellbeing #healthandfitness #basingstoke

#MuscleOfTheWeek
The gluteal muscles are a group of three muscles which make up the buttocks: the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus.
The three muscles originate from the ilium and sacrum and insert on the femur.
Parts:
Gluteus maximus, medius and minimus
Nerve:
Superior and inferior gluteal nerves (L4, L5, S1 and S2 nerve roots)
Vein:
Superior and inferior gluteal veins.
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What do these muscles do?
Each muscle of the gluteal group perform their own job to aid in movement.
The glute max is one of the biggest power producing muscles within your body.
In terms of movement, the glute max helps our body to perform movements associated with the hip and thigh.
The glute med helps our body to perform simple tasks such as aiding in stability for walking, running, and single leg weight bearing.
The glute min acts in a supporting role for the three gluteal muscles and it’s functions mimic those of the two other gluteal muscles. .
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#glutes #glutes🍑 #glutesofsteel #glutemaximus #glutemedius #gluteminimus #🍑 #buttocķs #hips #walking #running #support #weight #muscle #fleethampshire #fleet #uk #england #farnborough #surrey #farnham #bagshot #ascot #camberley #aldershot

Muscle of the week: Transversus abdominis (TA)

I’ve included all the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall in this week’s drawing, but since I’ve already done an entire ab series, I’ve decided to focus on just the TA.
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Origin: lower 6 ribs, lumbar fascia, anterior 2/3 of iliac crest, and lateral 1/2 of inguinal ligament
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Insertion: aponeurosis of posterior & anterior rectus sheath and conjoint tendon to pubic crest & pectineal line
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Actions: supports the abdominal wall; aids in forced expiration; helps aide infra-abdominal pressure
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Innervation: intercostal nerves 7-11, subcostal iliohypogastric nerve, ilioinguinal nerve
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The transversus abdominis, aka the transverse abdominis, is the innermost layer of the abdominal muscles and lies deep to the internal abdominal oblique. It helps provide thoracic and pelvic stability by aiding in the compression of the ribs and viscera. This action is believed to contribute to the performance of the Valsalva maneuver, which helps assist in activities such as heavy lifting, pushing, excretion, and giving birth.
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A popular exercise in rehab that helps activate the TA is the dead bug exercise (Fig. 1). When performing this exercise, start by flattening your back into the floor so that your core is engaged by being in a posterior pelvic tilt position. Keep this position for the entire duration of this exercise.
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The bird dog (Fig. 2) is another great core (and lower back) stability exercise. Be careful when performing this exercise that you do not bring your leg up so high that your lower back extends/arches. Keep your back flat and your neck and hips neutral (don’t let your hips rotate!).
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The starfish (Fig. 3) isn’t necessarily an exercise focused on the TA, but more so on engagement of the internal/external ab. oblique muscles (and honestly I just wanted to include another animal-named exercise). Make sure as you perform this exercise, you lift your shoulders and shoulder blades off the floor.
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I HOPE YOU ENJOY THE TIMELAPSE
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#abs#abdominalmuscles#anteriorabdominalwall#transverseabdominis#ta#muscles#muscleoftheweek#anatomy#greysanatomy#drawing#timelapse#physicaltherapy#physiotherapy

Muscle of the week: Gluteus maximus
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Origin: outer surface of ilium behind posterior gluteal line, posterior superior iliac crest, lumbar fascia, lateral sacrum, sacrotuberous ligament, and coccyx
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Insertion: gluteal tuberosity of the femur and iliotibial band (ITB)
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Action: extends and laterally rotates hip; maintains knee extension via the ITB
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Innervation: inferior gluteal nerve
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The gluteus maximus is the largest of the gluteal muscles, lying superficially and covering the other 2 muscles that make up the glutes (gluteus minimus, gluteus medius). As the main extensor of the hips, there are many ways to engage this prominent muscle. Any movement involving hip extension, like squats, deadlifts, or lunges, will play a role in activating the gluteus maximus. A few accessory movements you can do to target the glute max are Bulgarian split squats (fig. 1), weighted glute bridges (fig. 2), and banded kickbacks (fig. 3).
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When performing split squats, it’s important to take a wide enough stance so that when you bend your knee on the working leg, you are moving in an up-down motion as opposed to a forward-back motion. You can tell if your stance is too close if your knee travels extensively past your toes when you lower your hips. Also be aware of keeping your knee in a straight line as you perform this exercise; no knee valgus!
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For glute bridges, in order to engage more of your glute max as opposed to your hamstrings, keep your heel closer to your butt. This position will shorten the hamstring muscles, thereby making them less active and engaged when bridging. As a result, you must rely on your glutes to perform the bridge motion.
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Lastly, with kickbacks, you can loop a hip circle or resistance band around your ankles to provide some resistance against this hip extension motion. Hold onto a stable surface or wall for support, and bring your back leg up while keeping that knee relatively straight. Be careful not to bring your back leg up so high that your lumbar spine goes into extension (aka don’t let your lower back arch!).
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#gluteusmaximus#glutemax#glutes#gluteals#muscle#muscleoftheweek#anatomy#greysanatomy#drawings#physicaltherapy#physiotherapy

Muscle of the week: Gastrocnemius
feat. Egglegs

Origin: posterior medial and lateral condyles of the femur
Insertion: posterior surface of calcaneus via the calcaneal tendon
Action: plantar flexion of the foot and flexion of the knee
Innervation: tibial nerve

The gastrocnemius (red) and the soleus (purple) are the muscles that make up the calves. While there are several ways to exercise these muscles, most are pretty much a variation of the calf raise, which can be done either sitting or standing. The difference between sitting (knees flexed/bent) and standing (knees extended/straight) when performing a calf raise is that the standing version will focus on the gastrocnemius, while the sitting version will isolate the soleus. Thus, performing both variations will ensure a full calf workout. Another way to exercise the calves is to do some hill sprints. I personally like to workout muscle groups by utilizing functional movements, so hill sprints are a great way to emphasize calf strength endurance while getting in some cardio at the same time.
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#calves#gastrocnemius#soleus#muscles#muscleoftheweek#anatomy#greysanatomy#drawings#physicaltherapy#physiotherapy

#MuscleOfTheWeek
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As requested by a client, the Pelvic Floor muscles. Not always the prettiest muscle group to look at but it is part of our bodies and needs to be understood. Did you know that both men and women have pelvic floor muscles? So, whats the purpose of these muscles? When the pelvic floor muscles are contracted, the internal organs are lifted and the sphincters tighten the openings of the vagina, anus and urethra. Relaxing the pelvic floor allows passage of urine and faeces. Pelvic floor muscles are also important for sexual function in both men and women. .
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Although discussing such muscles can leave us giggling or feeling uncomfortable, it really is important to know how our bodies work.
#muscleoftheweek #muscle #muscles #knowledge #information #knowyourbody #pelvicfloor #pelvichealth #pelvicmuscles #dbmassage #massagetherapy #massage #therapist #fleethampahire #fleet #hampshire #surrey #farnham #farnborough #basingstoke #camberley #yateley #sandhurst #frimley #bracknell #frimleygreen

MUSCLE OF THE MONTH- RHOMBOIDS Often overlooked in training, the rhomboids help retract (pull back) the scapular, improving our posture and not becoming round shouldered.
The key function of the rhomboids is to pull- simples exercises like band pulls and bent over rows can help strengthen this muscle.
#rhomboids #muscleoftheweek #strengthen #injury #kinesiology #posture #posturecorrection #musclemovement

Muscle of the week: Extraocular muscles!

There are 6 extraocular muscles within the eye socket that surround and move your eyes. (1) The superior rectus attaches to the top of the eye and moves the eye upward. (2) The inferior rectus muscle attaches to the bottom of the eye and moves the eye downward. (3) The lateral rectus muscle attaches to the side of the eye towards the temple and moves the eye laterally (outwards). (4) The medial rectus muscle attaches to the side of the eye towards the nose and moves the eye medially (inward). (5) The superior oblique muscle originates from the back of the orbit and loops through the trochlea (small pulley structure in the orbit near the nose, not labeled) to attach onto the top of the eye. This muscle rotates the eye inward and also moves the eye downward. (6) The inferior oblique muscle originates medially from the front of the orbit and attaches to the bottom of the eye. This muscle rotates the eye outwards and also moves the eye upward.

The four rectus muscles (#1-4) originate as a fibrous ring in the back of the orbit and are known as the “annulus of Zinn.”
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#extraocularmuscles#eye#muscle#muscleoftheweek#anatomy#drawing#greysanatomy#physicaltherapy#physiotherapy

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