#mlkday

MOST RECENT

Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze. Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees. The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, first lynching memorial in history, opened yesterday. Honored to be here.

Every slab that is hanging inside the memorial has an identical twin slab that is lying outside the memorial (foreground). Each slab represents one state/county and the names of each lynching victim is inscribed on the slab.
Each county has been invited to claim its slab — the hope is that all the replicate slabs outside the memorial will be removed, because the represented county has taken responsibility for what happened on its soil. It will serve as a ledger of which counties take ownership of their history of lynching.

It wasn’t just the usual suspects in the South: California, Colorado, Utah, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, the east coast of Florida including Brevard and Broward counties, and New York (Orange County) all have slabs. Which counties/states will claim theirs?

Southern trees bearing strange fruit. Blood on the leaves and blood at the roots.

Maya Lin’s lynching memorial opened yesterday.

“From 1877 to 1950, millions of black Americans were targeted by racial terror lynchings. Over 4,400 lynchings have been documented. These lynchings, often conducted in broad daylight, were vicious acts of murder and their perpetrators acted with impunity. Black people were lynched by hanging, burning, shooting, drowning, stabbing and beating. Some were falsely accused of rape or murder, presumed guilty, and killed without trial or investigation; others were lynched for political activism or economic success, for their efforts to organize black communities for political and economic equality, for refusing to address a white man as “sir” or demanding to be served at the counter in a segregated soda shop.
Racial terror lynchings were distinct from hangings and mob violence committed against white people and other groups because THEY WERE INTENDED TO TERRORIZE BLACK AMERICANS AND ENFORCE RACIAL HIERARCHY. VICTIMS WERE TORTURED FOR HOURS BEFORE THEIR BRUTALIZED BODIES WERE LEFT OUT ON DISPLAY TO TRAUMATIZE OTHER BLACK PEOPLE.
With no protection from the constant threat of death, nearly six million black Americans fled the South between 1910 and 1970. Many left behind homes, families and employment to flee racial terror as traumatized refugees.

Lynchings in America were not isolated hate crimes committed by rogue vigilantes. Lynchings were targeted racial violence perpetrated to uphold an unjust social order. Lynchings were terrorism.

This era left thousands dead; significantly marginalized black people politically, financially and socially; and inflicted deep trauma on the entire African American community. These wounds have not yet healed. Lynchings occurred in communities where African Americans today remain marginalized, disproportionately poor, overrepresented in prisons and jails, and underrepresented in decision-making roles in the criminal justice system.”

UN chief honours enduring legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King

Recalling the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was assassinated 50 years ago today, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres urged the world to build on the civil rights leader’s work for equality and social justice. “Dr. King was one of the moral giants of the 20th century. He devoted his life to equality, justice, and non-violent social change,” said the UN chief in a statement attributable to his spokesperson. “Decades after his death, he continues to inspire all those around the world who are struggling for human rights and human dignity in the face of oppression, discrimination and injustice.” Dr. King’s advocacy and pronouncements against discrimination, and in favour of social justice, of global understanding and the virtues of diversity are more relevant today than ever, added the Secretary-General.

Born in January 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia, Dr. King was shot and killed on the evening of 4 April 1968 while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city.

In 1978, ten years after his death, the civil rights leader was posthumously awarded the United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights, honouring him for his outstanding contribution to the promotion and protection of the human rights embodied in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other human rights instruments.

Dr. King was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. . .

#dejavu #ihaveadream #dreamgirl #dreamcatcher #dream #dreamer #refresh #martinlutherking #martinlutherkingjr #mlk #mlkday #unesco #mamma #unicef #nobel #mommy #momboss #spiritual #africa #african #indigo #obama #human #humanity #socialmedia #social #french #award #paris #rights

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Malcolm X would have been 93 today but instead he was murdered at 39, like MLK. Two men, two approaches to change: We can learn from both. Here, endless jars of Alabama soil containing the DNA of BLACK lynching victims at the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, images of WHITE hate, and police brutality in Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham in BLACK AND WHITE. In the name of all those who sacrificed their lives and continue to do so every day: When we see, hear or read about an injustice against BLACK citizens, we have a duty, especially those of us of WHITE privilege, to be active upstanders, not passive bystanders. Only then will we all be free. And please support the Equal Justice Initiative @eji_org.

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Shameful.

Remembering Dr. King's message of peace that transformed our nation, inspiring us to love one another regardless of background or beliefs. #MLKDay

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