[PR] Gain and Get More Likes and Followers on Instagram.

#michiganstateuniversity

28581 posts

TOP POSTS

A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year analyzed. 🖐🏾More in comments👇🏾

Cracking pecans at Orchard Hill. Great old nutcracker given to us by some friends in Italy. Pecan variety developed by one of my father's last graduate students when he (my father) was a professor of horticulture at Michigan State University.

#nutcracker #pecans #michiganstateuniversity #nuts #orchardhilltreasures #orchardhillstyle #video #baking #kitchen

find me a more beautiful campus, i’ll wait
📸 @gracenxcorcoran

And it wouldn’t have been East Lansing without this weather at Spartan Stadium...#michiganstateuniversity @cfbonfox

Our #SEGreatPeople enjoyed visiting #michiganstateuniversity and meeting some great candidates, and Sparty! #michiganstate #michiganstatespartans #LifeIsOn @michiganstateu @msu_spartans

MOST RECENT

But nuccas wanna be scared of #cryptocurrency because "what if they decide to take all your bitcoins one day? 😭" #Welp😟 #ButGuessWhat? #BlockchainsCantBeHackedBih👊 #DoYourOwnResearch #DontBeSkurred Repost from @freedom_faction -- A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Not surprised.... #Repost @freedom_faction ・・・
A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year

"Lost" ... #Repost from @freedom_faction -- A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every y

find me a more beautiful campus, i’ll wait
📸 @gracenxcorcoran

@Regranned from @freedom_faction - A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year analyzed.

#Repost @freedom_faction ・・・
A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year analyzed.

A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year analyzed. 🖐🏾More in comments👇🏾

A new report analyzing the budgets of both the #DepartmentofDefense (#DOD) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), found that between 1998 and 2015, these two departments alone lost over $21 trillion in taxpayer funds.

The shocking report was authored by Dr. Mark Skidmore, a professor of economics at #MichiganStateUniversity, and Catherine Austin Fitts, former assistant secretary of housing. It notes that the missing funds are a direct result of “unsupported journal voucher adjustments” made to the departments’ budgets.

According to an Office of the Comptroller report: “Unsupported journal voucher adjustments” are defined as “summary-level accounting adjustments made when balances between systems cannot be reconciled. Often these journal vouchers are unsupported, meaning they lack supporting documentation to justify the adjustment [receipts, etc.] or are not tied to specific accounting transactions.” The report notes that, in both the private and public sectors, the presence of such adjustments is considered “a red flag” for potential fraud.

As reported last year by multiple alternative news outlets, the U.S. DOD, specifically the U.S. Army, could not account for $6.5 trillion in 2015 due to “wrongful balance adjustments.” According to a report by Reuters, the Army “lacked the receipts and invoices to support those numbers [the adjustments] or simply made them up” in order to “create an illusion that its books are balanced.” The DOD has officially acknowledged that its financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated.” In an interview with USA Watchdog, co-author Fitts noted that the missing $21 trillion amounts to “$65,000 for every man, woman and child resident in #America.” The amount of money unaccounted for is enough to pay back the whole of the U.S. national debt, which currently stands at roughly $20.5 trillion, and still have a half a trillion left.

Even more startling, the total amount of missing funds—$21 trillion—is most likely much higher in reality, as the data used for the report was incomplete due to the researchers being unable to recover complete data for every year analyzed. 🖐🏾More in comments👇🏾

Book Sale Round 2!

These shelves are loaded with Cookbooks and they are only $1 for the entire month of December! Make sure you stop by and check out the wide selection.
#spartansreuse #msu #michiganstateuniversity #surplusstore #surplustomer #reuse #recycling #sustainableliving #shoplocal #spartansrecycle #repurpose #zerowaste #books #sale #holiday #shopping #reading #spartanswill

Beach Side view at @beachsideresortpcb great morning sea breeze and waves. Just a beautiful morning #bsrpcb #fitnesstravellers #fitnessisnewlifestyle #lifeatthebeach #michiganstateuniversity #BSRPCB

Cracking pecans at Orchard Hill. Great old nutcracker given to us by some friends in Italy. Pecan variety developed by one of my father's last graduate students when he (my father) was a professor of horticulture at Michigan State University.

#nutcracker #pecans #michiganstateuniversity #nuts #orchardhilltreasures #orchardhillstyle #video #baking #kitchen

One more of Beaumont Tower in Black and White #beaumonttower #michiganstateuniversity #gogreen #gowhite

Beginning to look a lot like Christmas #freshsnow #beaumonttower #michiganstateuniversity

The sleepless nights will pay off. #finalsweek

Tb to that not so cute time i passed out on the bathroom floor on a Tuesday #michiganstateuniversity

msu粑粑

1 of 2 custom made wake surfboard for MSU fans! The best part of what I do is watching people smile from ear to ear. @madisoncharlottehill I know I know you want one! :) #madeinmichigan #puremichigan #michiganstate #michiganstateuniversity #greatlakes #noimports #michiganstatespartans #lakesurfing #wakesurfing #greatlakesmade #lovemichiganstate #forloveofwater

Where else to go after #michiganstateuniversity finals? After work meetings break at Beachside Resort Panama City Beach. The look when you get a Beach Side view. Great Reception, great view. Just perfect for the December break. #bsrpcb #fitnesstravellers #fitnessisnewlifestyle #michiganstatefitness #michiganstateuniversity #BSRPCB

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags