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Never seen it on a sunny day. #leavenworthprison #hubbyshometown

This is a 1931 Chevrolet 4 Door Sedan, all original interior and exterior. It's a customers car we picked up last week. It's been in the family since new, and it was used while the first owner was employed at Leavenworth State Penitentiary. The United States Penitentiary is a medium-security federal prison for male inmates in NE Kansas. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The owner now is wanting us to get it road-worthy so that he can enjoy driving it back on the road again. #LeavenworthPrison #1931Chevy #ornduffcraftsmanship #theHillsideHomesteadFarm

#leavenworthprison #eggplant and #peppers grown and distibuted to Leavenworth communities! #foodart

Yesterday we had an interesting question from @magic_snapper concerning the racial/ethnic makeup of Leavenworth prisoners around the turn of the 20th century. The above image is the Leavenworth Annual Report of 1906, the earliest report we have available. Swipe 👉 to see some statistics concerning inmates as of June 30, 1906. #askanarchivist #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Annual Reports, 1906-1926.

That's a piece of the Leavenworth wall I brought home with me. Over 100 years old. In the background is some gravel from the yard and the pill bottle I keep it in. I left lots of pieces of myself in there. It's only right to bring a piece of it out with me in exchange. #leavenworth #uspleavenworth #leavenworthprison #prison #federalprison #usp

| (#slideleft / #swipeleft) these are the mugshots of #williamwest & william #west. they are not related. they were both sent to #leavenworth (#leavenworthprison) at the same time in 19o3 & after some confusion, the staff understood they had two different #prisoners w/ the exact same name who looked exactly alike. they are part of the reason #fingerprints are now used as #identification & are also the reason we need #prisonreform. okay, #asyouwere.

#TrueCrimeTuesday 28-year-old Gabriel Jara arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on August 9, 1924. The Spanish speaking resident of Juarez, Mexico, had been sent to federal prison for violating the Fordney-McCumber Tariff of 1922. According to his indictment, Jara pleaded guilty to smuggling "58 1/2 gallons, 39 quarts, and 94 pints of distilled spirits" into the United States through the city of El Paso. It was his second violation under the National Prohibition Act. Jara was given an 18-month sentence and was required to pay a $250.00 fine. At the conclusion of his sentence, he was remanded to immigration authorities and deported.
#truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #movember #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Jara, Gabriel, 21652.

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#TrueCrimeTuesday 28-year-old Gabriel Jara arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on August 9, 1924. The Spanish speaking resident of Juarez, Mexico, had been sent to federal prison for violating the Fordney-McCumber Tariff of 1922. According to his indictment, Jara pleaded guilty to smuggling "58 1/2 gallons, 39 quarts, and 94 pints of distilled spirits" into the United States through the city of El Paso. It was his second violation under the National Prohibition Act. Jara was given an 18-month sentence and was required to pay a $250.00 fine. At the conclusion of his sentence, he was remanded to immigration authorities and deported.
#truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #movember #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Jara, Gabriel, 21652.

#TrueCrimeTuesday We've been waiting for the right opportunity to relaunch an 'ol favorite here at the National Archives at Kansas City. And @whammuseum has given us the perfect excuse to bring back the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary All-Mustache Team! You see, apparently the month of November is also known as "No-Shave November" or #Movember. According to the Movember Foundation (yes, this is a real entity), November is the month to highlight Men's Health. And to do so, we are going to share some great archival photos of men who refused to conform with society's standards, but sported beautiful mustachios at the same time.
Inmates clockwise starting at top left: George Gardner, Eastern Texas, Counterfeiting. George Bradley, Western Arkansas, Larceny. Andy Crittenden, Western Arkansas, Perjury. Philip Casey, Western Arkansas, Larceny.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #museumstache #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957.

Happy Halloween!! #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #oldpostcard #oldpostcards
#vintagepostcard #vintagepostcards

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Causey, Luke Philip, 10878.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Legal question of the day: Who exercises jurisdiction over an individual accused of a crime(s) committed "on the high seas?" The legal answer is that it depends on numerous factors, including, but not limited to: the severity of the alleged crime, the nationality of the accused, and the location of the boat when the alleged crime occurred. In general, however, if an American citizen commits a crime "on the high seas," the Federal government holds jurisdiction, and the FBI would conduct the investigation.

As a historical example, we present the case of Ollie Balestad and Harry Howell. Both Balestad (pictured on top) and Howell were sent to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on July 2, 1908. They were accused of "larceny on the high seas," and each received a one year sentence.

According to their commitment papers, "on April 9, 1908 on board the vessel 'Pere Marquette Car Ferry Number 15' upon the waters of Lake Michigan within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of the United States and within the jurisdiction of this court by feloniously stealing, taking and carrying away certain furs to the value of two thousand dollars of the personal goods of one Alfred Fraser ... with intent then and there the same personal property to steal and purloin." Howell worked on the boat and Balestad was his accomplice. Two thousand dollars in 1908 would be around $50,000 today. #truecrime #truecrimehistory #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Balestad, Ollie, 6097; and Howell, Harry, 6098.

#TrueCrimeTuesday The state of Minnesota has had its fair share of colorful politicians. Certainly one of the most intriguing was Francis H. Shoemaker, also known as Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate number 38163.

Shoemaker was a one-term Congressman from 1933-1935. In the midst of the Great Depression, he was a radical farm organizer and newspaper editor from Red Wing, Minnesota. His reputation was that of a bully and he maintained an outspoken personality. But these character traits, along with the fact that he had done time in Federal prison, did not keep his constituents from voting him into the House of Representatives.

Just two years earlier, on February 1, 1931, Shoemaker arrived at Leavenworth. He had been convicted of sending libelous matter through the mail, and was ordered to serve one year and one day in prison. More specifically, Shoemaker addressed a letter to a prominent banker as: "Robber of Widows and Orphans, Red Wing, Minn., in care of Temple of Greed and Chicanery." But Francis Shoemaker was no Robin Hood figure. According to a psychiatric examination in his prison file, Shoemaker had an "egocentric, psychopathic personality." He later punched a Washington, DC, taxi cab driver, exclaiming to the police officer who arrested him: "Yes, I hit him and next time I will kill him." He would later deny making that statement.

Shoemaker was released after serving just over nine months on November 6, 1931.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #truecrimehistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #minnesotahistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Shoemaker, Francis H., 38163.

#TrueCrimeTuesday 21-year-old Merlin Reed arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on January 15, 1910. He received a one year six month sentence for stealing a mail pouch. In his own words, Reed said: "Myself and Otho Battles (another inmate) took a mail pouch at Rock Island Depot at Topeka, Kansas. The pouch contained jewelry and cash, money orders and checks. We got one hundred and six dollars in cash and some jewelry. Was arrested and plead guilty of taking the above." Upon his arrival, Reed was immediately put to work doing back-breaking labor in the rock quarry. But his hard work and good behavior were rewarded about halfway through his term. The warden made him a trusty, a term for prisoners deemed to be trustful or reliable. Trusties were allowed certain privileges that other prisoners did not receive, and they were also given easier jobs. For the rest of his term, Reed was allowed to work in the horse stables under significantly less supervision. He was released early on March 28, 1911, having served only about 14 months. #truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Reed, Merlin, 6859.

Yesterday we had an interesting question from @magic_snapper concerning the racial/ethnic makeup of Leavenworth prisoners around the turn of the 20th century. The above image is the Leavenworth Annual Report of 1906, the earliest report we have available. Swipe 👉 to see some statistics concerning inmates as of June 30, 1906. #askanarchivist #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Annual Reports, 1906-1926.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Today is the final installment in our "Ladies of Leavenworth" series. By far the youngest member of the group, Lizzie Cardish was only 15 years old when she arrived at Leavenworth on June 15, 1906. -

She came from Wisconsin, where she lived with her family on the Menominee Indian Reservation. In a letter to the Department of Justice, the Warden of Leavenworth described Cardish as "a mere child, frightened at her surroundings, nervous, and badly needing the care of a woman." -

Cardish had been convicted at the Federal court in Oshkosh of arson. Details concerning the crime are not available in her prison file, but the act must have resulted in someone getting killed, because the young girl was handed a life sentence. -

One day after arriving at Leavenworth, Cardish was transferred to the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing. This was done because Leavenworth could not accomodate female prisoners, and according to the Warden "was an act rendered necessary by the highest considerations of propriety and, indeed, humanity." -

Luckily for Cardish, on September 11, 1906, the President of the United States commuted her sentence. How much prison time was eliminated is not known. But according to the 1910 Federal census, Cardish was still incarcerated, only this time at the Training School for Girls in Geneva, Illinois. She had been transferred there as part of the commutation. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #victorianfashion #1900sfashion #menominee #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Cardish, Lizzie, 5250.

#TrueCrimeTuesday This is the third installment in our "Ladies of Leavenworth" series. Today, we present Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate no. 2309.
Becky Cook arrived at Leavenworth on November 22, 1900, from San Angelo, Texas. She had been convicted of robbing a post office, and received a two-year sentence. According to a newspaper article in her prison file, Ms. Cook used the small hands of her daughter to reach inside the mailbox of a bank. Several checks were stolen, although it was never proved that she was actually able to cash them.

According to Cook's intake sheet, she was born in Madison County, Iowa, and left home at the age of 12. Somehow she made her way to Texas where she worked as a seamstress and washed laundry. She was 5'5" tall with brown hair and blue eyes. She claimed to be 25 years old, but prison officials noted her "apparent age" as 35. She was not married, and in contradiction to the newspaper article, claimed to not have any children.

Just like our two previous "Ladies of Leavenworth," Cook was transferred to the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing shortly after arriving at Leavenworth. She had been sent to Leavenworth by mistake, as the federal prison had no accommodations for women. #truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #victorianfashion #1900sfashion #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Cook, Becky, 2309.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Today we are continuing our series known as the "Ladies of Leavenworth." Only 12 women have ever been incarcerated at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The National Archives at Kansas City has four of the 12 mugshots available; the other eight mugshots have either been lost or stolen throughout the years.

For Week 2 we are highlighting Leavenworth inmate no. 2285, Mary Young. Mrs. Young wasn't so young when she arrived in Kansas on October 20, 1900. She claimed to be 60 years old, but it was noted in her inmate file that her apparent age was 70. This detail is corroborated by her age listed on the 1900 federal census, which was enumerated a little over three months before her incarceration.

However, Mary Young didn't travel alone to Leavenworth. Two of her four sons, Dave and Owen Young, accompanied her on the same train. But they weren't just providing comfort to their elderly mother. Dave and Owen were Leavenworth inmates 2283 and 2284, respectively. All three family members had been indicted on perjury charges in Helena, Arkansas.

Mary was given a term of one year and one day, but most of that time was spent at the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing. Two days after arriving at Leavenworth, on October 22, 1900, Young was transferred because the federal prison had no accommodations for women (Nor did they really have accommodations for men, but that's a different story). Unfortunately, Mary's trail goes cold following her incarceration. It isn't known how long she lived or where she is buried, although one would assume she returned to Arkansas, considering that she was born there and her entire family resided there. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Young, Mary, 2285.

In 1918, Charles L. Lambert was a member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), an international labor union whose members were also referred to as Wobblies. The IWW was openly opposed to American involvement in the Great War, which made them wildly unpopular. Lambert, along with 100 of his fellow Wobblies, was sentenced to prison in 1918 from the Northern District of Illinois for seditious conspiracy and obstructing the military draft. He received a 20-year sentence and a $20,000 fine: equal to about $350,000 today.
Luckily for Lambert, his sentence was commuted to time served by President Harding, and he was allowed to leave prison on January 31, 1923. Because he was a citizen of Scotland, a provision was added to Lambert's commutation. He was to be deported immediately and was never allowed to re-enter the United States. If he did return, his previous sentence would be reinstated.
The above letter, addressed to Charles Lambert from a fellow IWW member on October 19, 1922, is found in his Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate case file at the National Archives at Kansas City. #awesomeletterheads #awesomeletterhead #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #chicagohistory #truecrime #iww #internationalworkersoftheworld #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Lambert, Charles L. 13107.

#TrueCrimeTuesday The National Archives at Kansas City holds Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate case files for almost 75,000 individuals. The vast majority of those individuals are men. Only 12 women were ever incarcerated at Leavenworth, and all of them were sent there by mistake. Within days of their arrival all 12 women were transferred to other facilities because Leavenworth could not accomodate female prisoners. Mug shots are available for only four of those 12 women, the others being lost or pilfered over the years. These four women will be highlighted the next four Tuesdays.

The woman pictured above is Leavenworth inmate no. 2039, Mary Grayson. Mary was 19 years old when she was arrested in Muskogee, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on the charge of larceny. On February 26, 1900, she arrived at Leavenworth to serve a three-year term. According to her prison file, she stood 5'4", was literate, and a Baptist. She was married to a man named John Grayson and they did not have any children. Four days later she was transferred to the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing.
The prison term took a toll on Grayson's marriage. On June 1, 1900 - a little over three months after arriving at Leavenworth - the 1900 Federal Census was enumerated. According to that document, Grayson claimed to be divorced.
The circumstances surrounding Grayson's arrest and conviction for larceny are unknown. Unfortunately, her inmate file provides no pertinent details concerning her crime.
#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives #historichats #historicalhats #victorianfashion #1900sfashion

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Grayson, Mary, 2039.

#leavenworthprison #eggplant and #peppers grown and distibuted to Leavenworth communities! #foodart

#TrueCrimeTuesday! In 1917, Caffery Darensbourg left his family's home in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the age of 16, he wanted to earn a living, and tried his hand at being a porter for several years. But his real passion was music. Throughout the 1920s, Darensbourg made a name for himself as a renowned banjo player. One of his favorite gigs was playing in Manuel Perez's Garden of Joy Orchestra. From 1924-1927, during the fabulous Roaring '20s, the Orchestra was the house band at the Pythian Temple Roof Garden in New Orleans. However, when the club closed, Darensbourg was forced to play banjo on the street for money.
In 1932, Caffery followed his older brother Percy, also a musician, to Dallas, Texas, in search of more stable work. They settled in the black section of town, known as Deep Ellum, which had a thriving music scene. But life as a musician and club operator was difficult in those days, and violence was a common occurrence.
At some point, according to his prison file, Darensbourg was stabbed in the side, which caused him stomach trouble for the rest of his life. He was arrested several times by Dallas Police for Prohibition violations, and was sent to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on February 2, 1933, on three different liquor counts. He was 32 years old and by all accounts, a model prisoner. He was even released on parole nine months later.
But his troublesome lifestyle finally caught up seven years later. On February 17, 1940, Darensbourg was brought to Parkland Hospital with a gunshot wound in his abdomen. He lived four more excruciating days before finally dying on February 22. His death was ruled a homicide, but no murderer was ever found. He was only 38 years old. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #prohibition #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives #cafferydarensbourg #roaring20s #roaringtwenties #neworleanshistory #dallashistory #deepellum

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Darensbourg, Caffery, 42929.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Your guess is as good as our's concerning this one. 🤔 Meet Gus Thurman. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate no. 4398. Thurman was 37 years old when he arrived at Leavenworth on November 4, 1904. He had been sent north from Wewoka, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) to serve a sentence of one year and one day. His crime: Adultery. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram
#kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Thurman, Gus. 4398.

This image is the back of a letter from the Calhoun County, Michigan, Sheriff's Department to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Written October 17, 1953, the Sheriff is asking the prison to place a detainer on an inmate for a probation violation. #michigan #michiganhistory #southwestmichigan #calhouncountymi #calhouncountymichigan #berriencountymi #berriencountymichigan #casscountymi #casscountymichigan #stjosephcountymi #stjosephcountymichigan #branchcountymi #branchcountymichigan #kalamazoocountymi #kalamazoocountymichigan #traveladvert #traveladvertisement #traveladvertising #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Moffitt, Lowell W. 70289.

#TrueCrimeTuesday "The Skyjacker" From 1961-1973 there were over 150 hijackings of commercial aircraft within the United States of America. In 1972 alone there were 15 copy-cat hijackings, each more bizarre than the one preceding it.

Martin J. McNally, pictured above, was one of those copycat hijackers. He was inspired to hijack a jet, demand a ransom, and parachute to freedom after hearing on the radio about the manhunt for the infamous #dbcooper.
On June 23, 1972, McNally boarded an American Airlines flight in St. Louis, Missouri, bound for Tulsa, Oklahoma. He brandished a weapon and demanded $502,500.00, a shovel, and several parachutes. After receiving his loot, he ordered the pilot to fly northeast towards Toronto, Ontario. While flying over central Indiana, McNally jumped out the rear door of the aircraft. The violence of the jet stream ripped the bag of money from his body, and he was never able to recover it.

A few days later, with the aid of an informant, McNally was arrested at his home in Wyandotte, Michigan. He pleaded not guilty at his trial, but the government had more than enough evidence to convict. He received the maximum penalty: life imprisonment.
McNally spent 38 years in several different federal prisons. One of them was #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary. He was released on parole in 2010 at the age of 71, and is still alive today. #truecrime #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #hijacker #hijackers #skyjacker #skyjackers #martinmcnally #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

Editor's note: This is an abridged version of a longer article written in the National Archives at Kansas City July 2015 newsletter. It is available online here: www.archives.gov/files/kansas-city/press/newsletter/2015-july.pdf

RG 21: Records of the District Courts of the United States. U.S. District Court for the Eastern (St. Louis) Division of the Eastern District of Missouri. Criminal Case Files, 1864-1987. Case 72CR167, U.S. v. Martin Joseph McNally and Walter John Petlikowsky.

That's a piece of the Leavenworth wall I brought home with me. Over 100 years old. In the background is some gravel from the yard and the pill bottle I keep it in. I left lots of pieces of myself in there. It's only right to bring a piece of it out with me in exchange. #leavenworth #uspleavenworth #leavenworthprison #prison #federalprison #usp

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