#leavenworthprison

MOST RECENT

#TrueCrimeTuesday J.D. Sauls was a physician from Clarksdale, Mississippi. He arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on October 14, 1929. He had been transferred from the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary to serve out his six year sentence for dispensing narcotics. He listed his age as 54, but from his mugshot he seemed to be much older. According to his parole report: "On June 26, 1925, in company with an informer, Narcotic Agent met Dr. J.D. Sauls on the streets of Clarksdale, and knowing informer, said to them that if they had money he wanted to see them. The Narcotic Agent then purchased five grains of morphine from Dr. Sauls. At the same time they were told by Dr. Sauls that he would supply them with any amount of the drug they desired. Again, on June 29, 1925, Narcotic Agent and the informer met Dr. Sauls, the officer telling him that he wished to buy a dram of morphine. Dr. Sauls stated that he would let them have it but that it would not be safe for the officer and informer to be together at the time of the delivery. Dr. Sauls was paid $20.00 and he immediately handed to Narcotic Agent a pasteboard box containing thirty-five grains of morphine. On July 2, 1925, officer in company with the informer met Dr. Sauls in a drug store, where Dr. Sauls took them to the rear of the store and sold forty-three grains of morphine for $20.00. As soon as this sale was made the doctor was arrested and a search of his office made, where there were found two packages containing ten and twenty-three grains of morphine, respectively. In his office there were numerous boxes similar to the ones purchased. Dr. Sauls was not registered as a dealer in opium or other narcotics." #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Sauls, J.D., 33687.

#TrueCrimeTuesday We're a couple days late in getting our usual post done, but today we'll call it #TrueCrimeThursday.

The man pictured above is Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate number 8039, Joseph Kerwin, aka The Erie Strangler. Kerwin was convicted of "Piracy on the High Seas." What makes his case interesting is that technically he was convicted of "Piracy on the Great Lakes." He is the first - and only - person to be convicted on that charge.
On September 13, 1904, Kerwin strangled and robbed a woman while he was employed on a Great Lakes steamer. He was tried for piracy on the high seas, even though the Great Lakes are technically inland lakes. This was significant because the crime of piracy carried a life term, while assault and robbery would have been a much lesser penalty.
This was not the first time Kerwin had harmed a woman. In 1898, when Kerwin was 18 or 19 years old, he was convicted of raping his stepfather's housekeeper. In 1913, while incarcerated at Leavenworth, he choked a woman who worked as a stenographer at the prison. Nevertheless, he was paroled in 1925. While out on parole he was convicted of burglary and was sent back to Leavenworth. That is where he died on April 10, 1943.

Kerwin's prison file consists of four folders. It wasn't until 1937 that he underwent a psychiatric evaluation. In the report, Kerwin was "well-developed" and "in good physical health" for a man of his age. He was the conductor of the prison band and "he rendered meritorious service" during a fire at the institution. But he also showed "evidence of a frank psychosis," was "emotionally unperturbed," and displayed "constitutional psychopathic inferiority." #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #piracy #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Kerwin, Joseph, 8039.

Carlos' historical thought provoke of the day:

These are the mugshots or William West and William West, and they are not related. They were both sent to Leavenworth Prison at the same time, in 1903, and after some confusion, the staff understood they had 2 different prisoners with the same exact name and who looked exactly alike. They are part of the reason fingerprints are used for identification

#WilliamWest #LeavenworthPrison #FingerPrints

#TrueCrimeTuesday It's the first Tuesday of May. That means it is time for another edition of the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary All-Mustache Team! This group of bandits makes up the 4th Team. Remember, whichever team has the most likes at the end of 2018, will be crowned the mustache champions. ๐Ÿฅ‡ We still have eight more teams to go. Let's introduce our individual contenders (clockwise from top left): 1. Robert Bowers, South Carolina, Retail Liquor Dealer.
2. G.S. Ford, Arkansas, Assault.
3. John R. Wheeler, Texas, Assault with Intent to Kill.
4. Frank L. Turner, Kansas, Counterfeiting.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Various inmates.

#TrueCrimeTuesday It's not unusual for a prisoner to be incarcerated more than once. Recidivism is a big problem in the American criminal justice system. However, it is unusual when a husband and wife are convicted of the same crime.
The man pictured above is Arthur Burns, originally from Joplin, Missouri. Swipe left to see an earlier photo of him. Arthur Burns was convicted, along with his wife Sarah Burns, of violating the White Slave Traffic Act, also known as the Mann Act. In 1915, they were accused of luring two young women from Arkansas into a life of "prostitution and debauchery." Arthur received a three-year sentence at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Sarah was given one year at the Lansing State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas. Arthur's correspondence log in his prison file indicates the husband and wife wrote to each other quite often.

His prison file also sheds light on the kind of life Arthur lived outside the walls. According to his initial medical examination, Arthur had no less than four different scars from stab wounds and one gunshot wound in his left thigh. He also had a history of venereal disease and his right index finger had been amputated at the first knuckle. He was 31 years old in 1915 and stood tall at 6 feet 4 inches.

Arthur was released in 1917 and moved with Sarah to Ennis, Texas. But he seems to have disappeared after registering for the draft during World War I.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Burns, Arthur, 5808 & 9991.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Nelson T. Tucker, a 54-year-old farmer from Kaufman, Texas, arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on January 24, 1911. He "was charged at Dallas with distilling whisky. I and a man named H. Palmer made some whisky and divided it. The authorities got to know of it and Palmer said that I sold the whisky to him. I pled guilty and was sentenced to 18 months." Palmer is not among the names of prisoners who arrived at Leavenworth on January 24th.
Tucker was married and had nine children. It isn't known how many were still living at home. He had a deformed wrist, the result of a Colles fracture which never healed properly. He was released on April 3, 1912, having served just over 14 months.
#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Tucker, Nelson T., 7339.

#TrueCrimeTuesday When this photo was taken on May 7, 1902, the subject was under the presumption that he was going to spend the rest of his life in prison. Norris Cooper, a Choctaw Indian, had been arrested several months earlier, along with five other men, on the charge of First Degree Murder. According to Cooper, "I was charged with shooting and killing one J.B. Drake at Sans Bois, Indian Territory [Oklahoma] in 1896. This man was killed in the night and I was one of five Indians implicated. The evidence was purely circumstantial and I pled not guilty." However, a jury in Fort Smith, Arkansas, found him and two other men guilty and they were shipped off to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary.
As is often the case in the American legal system, however, Cooper and his companions did not spend the rest of their lives in prison. Through a process of appeals, on September 3, 1908, Cooper's sentence was commuted to 15 years by the President of the United States. He was discharged on May 30, 1912, having served just over 10 years.
Swipe ๐Ÿ‘ˆ to see a couple of the subject's violations while in prison. Our librarian followers should especially take note of the first violation. ๐Ÿ“–โœ #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Cooper, Norris, 2969.

#TrueCrimeTuesday It's the first Tuesday of April, and that means it's time for the 3rd edition of the of the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary All-Mustache Team. Remember, we are going to showcase nine more teams throughout the rest of the year, and the crop of mustachioed bandits with the most likes will win the highly coveted, yet totally fictional, All-Mustache Team trophy! ๐Ÿ† Let's introduce the April contenders (clockwise from top left): 1. Ben Wilson, Eastern Texas, Horse Stealing.
2. George W. Zimmermann, Kansas, Breaking into Post Office.
3. William B. Phillips, Indian Territory, Impersonating a Government Officer.
4. Pedro Flores, Western Texas, Smuggling.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Various inmates.

#TrueCrimeTuesday 55-year-old John Leibig arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on July 11, 1918. A rancher from Wyoming, Leibig had been convicted of violating the Espionage Act of 1917.
The Espionage Act was enacted on June 15, 1917, shortly after the United States entered World War I. It was passed under the widespread belief that many Americans - even natural-born citizens - were engaged in activities that were detrimental to the war effort, and were therefore undermining the Republic itself.

John Leibig was a native of Germany, but also a naturalized U.S. citizen. He had been accused of verbally threatening the President of the United States. His Leavenworth file does not mention what exactly he said, but he was arrested by the local sheriff, plead guilty to the charges, and was shipped off to prison for one year and six months.

Leibig was a bachelor and had no children. He disappeared after getting out of prison in 1919. His prison file contains several letters written in the 1930s from concerned relatives seeking his whereabouts. The prison authorities had no idea. There is also an interesting letter from a Rawlins, Wyoming, law firm named Armstrong & Armstrong. The second paragraph states: "I am anxious to locate his [Leibig's] whereabouts. He has some property in this community, which he seems to have abandoned. I represented him in a murder case, and had him acquitted. After that he was tried and railroaded into a Federal prison as an alien enemy, by a bunch of young fellows who framed him; at least that is my opinion." Interesting ๐Ÿค”

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison
#leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Leibig, John, 12956.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Donald Leroy Hoke arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on September 26, 1929. He was to serve a 13-year sentence for the following offense: "On March 30, 1929, about 2:00 P.M., Hoke, with another man, entered the A & P grocery store ... and held up the manager ... with a gun, together with 3 other employees. Hoke took $54.00 from the cash register and they ordered the people in the store into the lavatory, where they locked them up and escaped in an automobile." The crime took place in Washington, DC, but Hoke was arrested in his hometown of Dayton, Ohio.

At first, Hoke acclimated to his surroundings well. He was made a trusty in August 1931 and was transferred to the minimum security farm. But the lax security was a temptation and Hoke escaped on October 4, 1931. He was re-captured and returned to Leavenworth a short time later on February 4, 1932. The rest of 1932 was not a good year for Hoke. He spent six days in isolation for breaking various rules, was reduced to 3rd grade, and forfeited all his good time. However, his last violation was in July 1933 and he was a model prisoner for the rest of his term.

Due to his good behavior, 780 days of his good time was restored in 1938. He was released October 3, 1939.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Hoke, Donald Leroy, 33453.

#TrueCrimeTuesday It takes all sorts of criminals to make up a prison population: murderers, rapists, robbers, con-artists, drug dealers. But one of the worst criminals in history has to be the gentleman pictured above, Charles Wille. Don't let his bookish features fool you. This guy - from the mean streets of St. Louis, Missouri - was as dangerous as they come. On February 6, 1915, Wille and nine other men arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. They had all been convicted of a heinous crime: violating the Oleomargarine Act of 1886. ๐Ÿง€
Wait ... what?! That's right. Wille and his evil co-conspirators went to Federal prison for manufacturing oleomargarine, or rather, not paying the two-cent per pound tax imposed on the butter substitute. On August 2, 1886, the Oleomargarine Act was signed into law by President Grover Cleveland. The bill was introduced in Congress at the behest of the dairy industry, who believed oleomargarine was a threat to their profits. Not surprisingly, it was championed by representatives from the state of Wisconsin. "If I could have the kind of legislation that I want ... I would make the tax so high that the operation of the law would utterly destroy the manufacture of all counterfeit butter and cheese ..." said Representative William Price. Charles Wille spent one year locked away with actual criminals, and the Oleomargarine Act was not repealed until 1950.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #truecrime #oleomargarine #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Wille, Charles, 9437

#TrueCrimeTuesday It's time for the 2nd edition of the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary All-Mustache Team! It's been a while since the 1st team was published, so feel free to scroll back in our feed to compare contenders. Because at the end of 2018, the team with the most likes will win the highly coveted, yet totally fictional, All-Mustache Team trophy! ๐Ÿ™ŒSo without further ado, let's meet today's contenders. Moving clockwise from the top left:

1. Willis Lee, Kansas, Transmitting False Writing.
2. Squire B. Street, Kansas, Assault with Intent to Kill.
3. John T. Evans, Indian Territory, Forgery.
4. Frank W. Vaughn, Indian Territory, Grand Larceny.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Various inmates.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Ellis T. Beebe earned a two-year stay at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary for violating the White Slave Traffic Act. On October 3, 1926, Beebe was arrested in Paris, Illinois. Authorities learned that he had paid the transportation costs for a young woman in Iowa to travel across state lines to Illinois for "immoral purposes." At the time of the crime, Beebe was married and the young woman was under the age of 18.

The prison sentence ended Beebe's marriage, but it did not end his Playboy lifestyle. His prison file is full of correspondence from women either claiming to be his wife or simply on friendly terms. Even the Warden wrote in a letter to a detective that Beebe's marriage status "seems to be rather complicated." After being paroled on October 27, 1927, Beebe married another woman in Chicago, Illinois, and bilked her out of $1,000.00. He was re-arrested when his new wife became suspicious of where her money had gone.

Beebe's arms were covered in tattoos and his occupation was a musician. In 1942, he was discovered by police after being locked in a railroad box car for four days. The following year, he was a suspect in a kidnapping case in Los Angeles, California. In 1948, he was back in Chicago working as a laborer for the Chicago and North Western Railroad. Ellis Beebe died in 1973.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mannact #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Beebe, Ellis T., 26244.

The National Archives at Kansas City would like to wish all our followers a very Happy Valentine's Day!! ๐Ÿ’˜

#westernunion #telegram #valentinesday #prisonhistory #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #loveinthearchives #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Gordon, Harry, 28772.

#TrueCrimeTuesday 40-year old Vaughn H. Thomas arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on May 11, 1934. He was to serve one year and one day for violating Internal Revenue laws. According to his prison file, "Vaughn H. Thomas, together with co-defendant, George Coulter, operated at and in a dwelling house located at 701 Cleveland Avenue, in Kansas City, Missouri, a 75-gallon whiskey still, which had not been registered with the Collector of Internal Revenue, as required by law." According to his initial physical examination, Thomas had a "far advanced chronic facial infection, and one eye absent." He had lost the eye 20 years earlier in 1914.
Thomas had no previous criminal history, and was considered a model prisoner. He worked at the prison farm, which had far less restrictions than the main prison, and he was even allowed to leave the prison for a few hours on June 14, 1934, to attend a funeral. He was released on parole on November 20, 1934.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #kchistory #kcmohistory #kansascityhistory #historickc #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Thomas, Vaughn H., 44982.

My uncle passed away on February 3rd. He was 89. I posted about him before. He served time in Alcatraz and various prisons. He friended some well known Alcatraz inmates, including "The Birdman" Robert Strauss and Whitey Bulger, as well as the 3 escapees from which the Clint Eastwood film was based. He was a wild guy who used to scare the shit out me as a child by telling me a tribe of Indians lived in the woods behind his house and they would scalp me if I went back there. Was afraid to visit him till I figured out he was just fucking with me. RIP Uncle Louie. Here's a link to a great article about his crime days for anyone intetested... https://articles.cleveland.com/obituaries/index.ssf/2018/02/notorious_cleveland_bank_robbe.amp

LINK IS NOW ALSO IN BIO !! ...My son @dean5_11 showed me how. Lol
#alcatraz #leavenworthprison #mansfieldprison #therock #bankrobber #criminal #50s #1950s #fifties #Cleveland #Ohio #louisteller #guns #whiteybulger #thebirdmanofalcatraz #robertstrauss #anglinbrothers #escapefromalcatraz #gunpoint #passedaway #RIP

We're going to do something a little bit different today for #TrueCrimeTuesday. Normally we feature criminals every Tuesday, but today we are highlighting the other side of the law: enforcement.

The gentleman pictured above is Walter A. Hunter. He was the warden of Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary for about 10 years, from 1942-1952. Previously, he was employed as either a warden or associate warden at several different facilities under the purview of the Bureau of Prisons. He had also served 12 years at the Michigan State Prison in Jackson, Michigan.

At Leavenworth, Hunter oversaw a huge increase in the prisoner population due to World War II. One misnomer about the term Leavenworth is that it has evolved to represent a single prison. But there are actually several facilities in the town of Leavenworth. The two that get confused quite often are Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary and the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth (USDB). The USDB only holds military offenders while Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary only holds civilian offenders.

Historically, however, both facilities have held civilian and military offenders. This was generally due to major increases in prisoner populations because of wars, particularly World War I and II, and because of increased legislation such as Prohibition and drug laws. The two facilities, separated by only a few miles, have had a rather cordial relationship in accommodating the needs of the other.

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #warden #wardens #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Photographs Relating to Prison Activities, 1936-1971.

... And we're back. #TrueCrimeTuesday Thirty-one year old George Zelof was a traveling salesman from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, when he was arrested by federal authorities in October 1918. Not your typical hardened criminal, Zelof was arrested (along with two accomplices) for "using the mails to defraud." Virtually no details about the crime are provided in his inmate case file, but basically he was running some kind of monetary scheme through the mail.
Swipe ๐Ÿ‘ˆ to see an interesting letter from Zelof's girlfriend written to the prison doctor. Harriet Wallner was George Zelof's biggest advocate outside of prison, and greatly aided him in getting a parole. Zelof's parents were deceased, so on both his prison records and his World War I draft registration card, she was listed as the person to notify in case of sickness or death. From the tone of her letter, it seems she genuinely cared about Zelof: "I have always felt if we had married when we talked about it some time ago he would not be there [prison] today." According to public documents, Zelof did indeed live with Harriet for a while after his release on April 21, 1920. However, unless Harriet Wallner changed her name to Vera Starr, it appears Zelof married a different woman in 1929. ๐Ÿ’”

#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Zelof, George, 13694.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Charles Ackers arrived at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on January 3, 1909. He was to serve 2 years and pay a $5,000.00 fine for his participation in a "conspiracy to commit a crime against the United States." The conspiracy involved Ackers and two other men robbing a postal train in North Dakota. According to his indictment, the defendants gathered "fire arms, ammunition, explosives, dynamite, nitro glycerin, fuse, percussion caps, ropes and other appliances" and hid along the route of the postal train.
There is no mention how or when Ackers and the others were arrested. Nor is there mention whether or not the bandits actually went through with their plan. All the defendants were convicted of conspiracy, a much lighter charge than armed robbery. Ackers was released from Leavenworth on September 12, 1910.

#truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #northdakotahistory #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #trainrobber #trainrobbers #trainrobbery #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Ackers, Charles, 6273.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Within the last decade or so the term "catfishing" has become part of English vernacular. In this case we're not referring to the action of literally catching a catfish from a body of water. Instead, catfishing basically refers to someone who practices deceit by purporting to be someone they are not. The term has recently taken hold primarily due to the popularity of the MTV reality-show "Catfish." However, catfishing is not a new phenomenon.
The two photos above are of Robert Harvey. Mr. Harvey had the pleasure of two different stints in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The first was from 1934-1936 when he was 52 years old, and the second was from 1937-1939. Each time he was arrested and convicted on the charge of using the mails to defraud. More specifically, in 1934 Harvey "used the United States Mails to defraud by writing to a man in Los Angeles, California and representing to that man that he (the prisoner) was a young woman who desired to marry the man. The prisoner received from this man a small amount of money intended to be used in purchasing transportation to go from Kansas City, Missouri to Los Angeles, California. Prisoner admitted that he had used such schemes over a period of 20 years and that he had made from $1200.00 to $1500.00 a year by using the mails to defraud." In 1937, Harvey "represented himself to be one Edith Brooks, a young girl who desired to get married. By letters to one Joyce Bailey, defendant induced him to send the sum of $50.00 for a wedding outfit." Robert Harvey had also been arrested twice previously, once for using the same scheme in Omaha, Nebraska, and once for larceny in Canon City, Colorado.
According to a report sent to the United States Attorney General in 1937, Harvey was a "habitual criminal" who did not deserve to be paroled.

#truecrime #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #catfishing #catfisher #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Harvey, Robert, 45414 and 51072.

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags