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#leavenworthprison #eggplant and #peppers grown and distibuted to Leavenworth communities! #foodart

Never seen it on a sunny day. #leavenworthprison #hubbyshometown

This is a 1931 Chevrolet 4 Door Sedan, all original interior and exterior. It's a customers car we picked up last week. It's been in the family since new, and it was used while the first owner was employed at Leavenworth State Penitentiary. The United States Penitentiary is a medium-security federal prison for male inmates in NE Kansas. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The owner now is wanting us to get it road-worthy so that he can enjoy driving it back on the road again. #LeavenworthPrison #1931Chevy #ornduffcraftsmanship #theHillsideHomesteadFarm

#TrueCrimeTuesday Today we are continuing our series known as the "Ladies of Leavenworth." Only 12 women have ever been incarcerated at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The National Archives at Kansas City has four of the 12 mugshots available; the other eight mugshots have either been lost or stolen throughout the years.

For Week 2 we are highlighting Leavenworth inmate no. 2285, Mary Young. Mrs. Young wasn't so young when she arrived in Kansas on October 20, 1900. She claimed to be 60 years old, but it was noted in her inmate file that her apparent age was 70. This detail is corroborated by her age listed on the 1900 federal census, which was enumerated a little over three months before her incarceration.

However, Mary Young didn't travel alone to Leavenworth. Two of her four sons, Dave and Owen Young, accompanied her on the same train. But they weren't just providing comfort to their elderly mother. Dave and Owen were Leavenworth inmates 2283 and 2284, respectively. All three family members had been indicted on perjury charges in Helena, Arkansas.

Mary was given a term of one year and one day, but most of that time was spent at the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing. Two days after arriving at Leavenworth, on October 22, 1900, Young was transferred because the federal prison had no accommodations for women (Nor did they really have accommodations for men, but that's a different story). Unfortunately, Mary's trail goes cold following her incarceration. It isn't known how long she lived or where she is buried, although one would assume she returned to Arkansas, considering that she was born there and her entire family resided there. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Young, Mary, 2285.

| (#slideleft / #swipeleft) these are the mugshots of #williamwest & william #west. they are not related. they were both sent to #leavenworth (#leavenworthprison) at the same time in 19o3 & after some confusion, the staff understood they had two different #prisoners w/ the exact same name who looked exactly alike. they are part of the reason #fingerprints are now used as #identification & are also the reason we need #prisonreform. okay, #asyouwere.

That's a piece of the Leavenworth wall I brought home with me. Over 100 years old. In the background is some gravel from the yard and the pill bottle I keep it in. I left lots of pieces of myself in there. It's only right to bring a piece of it out with me in exchange. #leavenworth #uspleavenworth #leavenworthprison #prison #federalprison #usp

Today, the National Archives at Kansas City is beginning a new series. #TrueCrimeTuesday is going to be a weekly feature that will highlight some of the more colorful characters who found themselves on the wrong side of the law. The National Archives at Kansas City holds almost 75,000 inmate case files from Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. They are one of our most requested series of records, and probably one of the most popular.

We are going to begin with Leavenworth inmate number 6768, Frank Grigware. Mr. Grigware is probably one of the most notorious criminals in #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary history that you've never heard of. Why? Because he was one of the few - possibly the only - to escape from Leavenworth without ever being returned. Grigware was able to escape from Leavenworth in 1910, flee to Canada, and evade detection for 23 years. By 1933, when he was found, Grigware had established a new identity and was living as an upstanding citizen in the province of Alberta. An outpouring of support by Canadian citizens and the press influenced the U.S. Department of Justice to drop its extradition request in 1934. But Grigware was never able to return to the United States. He died a free man in 1977 at the age of 91. For more information about Grigware, the book "Leavenworth Train" by Joe Jackson is recommended. #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #leavenworthhistory #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #trainrobber #trainrobbers #trainrobbery #escapedconvict

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Grigware, Frank, 6768.

The National Archives at Kansas City houses historical records related to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The most popular series of Leavenworth records are the inmate case files, which date from 1895-1957. Inmate case files provide detailed information on the lives of individuals who were incarcerated. There are over 74,000 case files available.
The image above is the mugshot of Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate no. 17431, Robert Stroud, otherwise known as The Birdman of Alcatraz. One of the most notorious criminals in American history, Stroud was incarcerated at Leavenworth long before he went to Alcatraz and earned his nickname. He died in 1963 while still in custody at the Federal Medical Center in Springfield, Missouri. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #robertstroud #birdmanofalcatraz #archivesofinstagram #truecrime #truecrimetuesday #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Stroud, Robert. Inmate No. 17431.

MOST RECENT

#TrueCrimeTuesday Today we are continuing our series known as the "Ladies of Leavenworth." Only 12 women have ever been incarcerated at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The National Archives at Kansas City has four of the 12 mugshots available; the other eight mugshots have either been lost or stolen throughout the years.

For Week 2 we are highlighting Leavenworth inmate no. 2285, Mary Young. Mrs. Young wasn't so young when she arrived in Kansas on October 20, 1900. She claimed to be 60 years old, but it was noted in her inmate file that her apparent age was 70. This detail is corroborated by her age listed on the 1900 federal census, which was enumerated a little over three months before her incarceration.

However, Mary Young didn't travel alone to Leavenworth. Two of her four sons, Dave and Owen Young, accompanied her on the same train. But they weren't just providing comfort to their elderly mother. Dave and Owen were Leavenworth inmates 2283 and 2284, respectively. All three family members had been indicted on perjury charges in Helena, Arkansas.

Mary was given a term of one year and one day, but most of that time was spent at the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing. Two days after arriving at Leavenworth, on October 22, 1900, Young was transferred because the federal prison had no accommodations for women (Nor did they really have accommodations for men, but that's a different story). Unfortunately, Mary's trail goes cold following her incarceration. It isn't known how long she lived or where she is buried, although one would assume she returned to Arkansas, considering that she was born there and her entire family resided there. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Young, Mary, 2285.

In 1918, Charles L. Lambert was a member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), an international labor union whose members were also referred to as Wobblies. The IWW was openly opposed to American involvement in the Great War, which made them wildly unpopular. Lambert, along with 100 of his fellow Wobblies, was sentenced to prison in 1918 from the Northern District of Illinois for seditious conspiracy and obstructing the military draft. He received a 20-year sentence and a $20,000 fine: equal to about $350,000 today.
Luckily for Lambert, his sentence was commuted to time served by President Harding, and he was allowed to leave prison on January 31, 1923. Because he was a citizen of Scotland, a provision was added to Lambert's commutation. He was to be deported immediately and was never allowed to re-enter the United States. If he did return, his previous sentence would be reinstated.
The above letter, addressed to Charles Lambert from a fellow IWW member on October 19, 1922, is found in his Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate case file at the National Archives at Kansas City. #awesomeletterheads #awesomeletterhead #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #chicagohistory #truecrime #iww #internationalworkersoftheworld #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Lambert, Charles L. 13107.

#TrueCrimeTuesday The National Archives at Kansas City holds Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate case files for almost 75,000 individuals. The vast majority of those individuals are men. Only 12 women were ever incarcerated at Leavenworth, and all of them were sent there by mistake. Within days of their arrival all 12 women were transferred to other facilities because Leavenworth could not accomodate female prisoners. Mug shots are available for only four of those 12 women, the others being lost or pilfered over the years. These four women will be highlighted the next four Tuesdays.

The woman pictured above is Leavenworth inmate no. 2039, Mary Grayson. Mary was 19 years old when she was arrested in Muskogee, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on the charge of larceny. On February 26, 1900, she arrived at Leavenworth to serve a three-year term. According to her prison file, she stood 5'4", was literate, and a Baptist. She was married to a man named John Grayson and they did not have any children. Four days later she was transferred to the women's prison at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing.
The prison term took a toll on Grayson's marriage. On June 1, 1900 - a little over three months after arriving at Leavenworth - the 1900 Federal Census was enumerated. According to that document, Grayson claimed to be divorced.
The circumstances surrounding Grayson's arrest and conviction for larceny are unknown. Unfortunately, her inmate file provides no pertinent details concerning her crime.
#leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives #historichats #historicalhats #victorianfashion #1900sfashion

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Grayson, Mary, 2039.

#leavenworthprison #eggplant and #peppers grown and distibuted to Leavenworth communities! #foodart

#TrueCrimeTuesday! In 1917, Caffery Darensbourg left his family's home in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the age of 16, he wanted to earn a living, and tried his hand at being a porter for several years. But his real passion was music. Throughout the 1920s, Darensbourg made a name for himself as a renowned banjo player. One of his favorite gigs was playing in Manuel Perez's Garden of Joy Orchestra. From 1924-1927, during the fabulous Roaring '20s, the Orchestra was the house band at the Pythian Temple Roof Garden in New Orleans. However, when the club closed, Darensbourg was forced to play banjo on the street for money.
In 1932, Caffery followed his older brother Percy, also a musician, to Dallas, Texas, in search of more stable work. They settled in the black section of town, known as Deep Ellum, which had a thriving music scene. But life as a musician and club operator was difficult in those days, and violence was a common occurrence.
At some point, according to his prison file, Darensbourg was stabbed in the side, which caused him stomach trouble for the rest of his life. He was arrested several times by Dallas Police for Prohibition violations, and was sent to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary on February 2, 1933, on three different liquor counts. He was 32 years old and by all accounts, a model prisoner. He was even released on parole nine months later.
But his troublesome lifestyle finally caught up seven years later. On February 17, 1940, Darensbourg was brought to Parkland Hospital with a gunshot wound in his abdomen. He lived four more excruciating days before finally dying on February 22. His death was ruled a homicide, but no murderer was ever found. He was only 38 years old. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #prohibition #archivesofinstagram #kansascityarchives #cafferydarensbourg #roaring20s #roaringtwenties #neworleanshistory #dallashistory #deepellum

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Darensbourg, Caffery, 42929.

#TrueCrimeTuesday Your guess is as good as our's concerning this one. 🤔 Meet Gus Thurman. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate no. 4398. Thurman was 37 years old when he arrived at Leavenworth on November 4, 1904. He had been sent north from Wewoka, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) to serve a sentence of one year and one day. His crime: Adultery. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #truecrime #archivesofinstagram
#kansascityarchives
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Thurman, Gus. 4398.

This image is the back of a letter from the Calhoun County, Michigan, Sheriff's Department to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Written October 17, 1953, the Sheriff is asking the prison to place a detainer on an inmate for a probation violation. #michigan #michiganhistory #southwestmichigan #calhouncountymi #calhouncountymichigan #berriencountymi #berriencountymichigan #casscountymi #casscountymichigan #stjosephcountymi #stjosephcountymichigan #branchcountymi #branchcountymichigan #kalamazoocountymi #kalamazoocountymichigan #traveladvert #traveladvertisement #traveladvertising #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #archivesofinstagram
RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Moffitt, Lowell W. 70289.

#TrueCrimeTuesday "The Skyjacker" From 1961-1973 there were over 150 hijackings of commercial aircraft within the United States of America. In 1972 alone there were 15 copy-cat hijackings, each more bizarre than the one preceding it.

Martin J. McNally, pictured above, was one of those copycat hijackers. He was inspired to hijack a jet, demand a ransom, and parachute to freedom after hearing on the radio about the manhunt for the infamous #dbcooper.
On June 23, 1972, McNally boarded an American Airlines flight in St. Louis, Missouri, bound for Tulsa, Oklahoma. He brandished a weapon and demanded $502,500.00, a shovel, and several parachutes. After receiving his loot, he ordered the pilot to fly northeast towards Toronto, Ontario. While flying over central Indiana, McNally jumped out the rear door of the aircraft. The violence of the jet stream ripped the bag of money from his body, and he was never able to recover it.

A few days later, with the aid of an informant, McNally was arrested at his home in Wyandotte, Michigan. He pleaded not guilty at his trial, but the government had more than enough evidence to convict. He received the maximum penalty: life imprisonment.
McNally spent 38 years in several different federal prisons. One of them was #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary. He was released on parole in 2010 at the age of 71, and is still alive today. #truecrime #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #hijacker #hijackers #skyjacker #skyjackers #martinmcnally #archivesofinstagram

Editor's note: This is an abridged version of a longer article written in the National Archives at Kansas City July 2015 newsletter. It is available online here: www.archives.gov/files/kansas-city/press/newsletter/2015-july.pdf

RG 21: Records of the District Courts of the United States. U.S. District Court for the Eastern (St. Louis) Division of the Eastern District of Missouri. Criminal Case Files, 1864-1987. Case 72CR167, U.S. v. Martin Joseph McNally and Walter John Petlikowsky.

That's a piece of the Leavenworth wall I brought home with me. Over 100 years old. In the background is some gravel from the yard and the pill bottle I keep it in. I left lots of pieces of myself in there. It's only right to bring a piece of it out with me in exchange. #leavenworth #uspleavenworth #leavenworthprison #prison #federalprison #usp

#TrueCrimeTuesday - "The Escape Artist" - Norvin Roark first entered Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in 1926. But he was supposed to be there seven years earlier. In 1918, Private Norvin Roark was a member of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in France. One night, he and another soldier had too much to drink and got in an altercation with a third soldier. Roark, fueled by alcohol and bravado, stabbed the other soldier in the head. He was quickly arrested and charged with murder. At his court-martial trial Roark was found guilty, but of the lessor charge of manslaughter. Sometime in 1919 (even the military authorities couldn't pinpoint an exact date), Roark escaped from the stockade.
For the next seven years Private Roark remained on the lam. It isn't known exactly where he was hiding, but later rumors suggested he was actually living a lavish lifestyle in Austria. At some point, the native of Arkansas returned home. There he was arrested by a local sheriff. But the day after military authorities were notified, Roark escaped again, possibly with the aid of the sheriff, who was Roark's cousin.

Federal marshals eventually tracked Roark down, hiding in the Arkansas backcountry. In 1926, he was delivered to Leavenworth to serve his life sentence. He served his time quietly for the next 22 years. In 1948, however, he was declared insane and was transferred to the Federal Medical Center in Springfield, Missouri. For a third time, Roark escaped custody, whereby he returned to Arkansas. Again he was re-arrested and finally paroled in 1953. Roark died unceremoniously in 1956 at a Little Rock, Arkansas train station. He was 62 years old. #truecrime #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #archivesofinstagram #doughboy #doughboys #escapedconvict #americanexpeditionaryforce #americanexpeditionaryforces #leavenworthhistory #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Roark, Norvin, 25669.

Today, the National Archives at Kansas City is beginning a new series. #TrueCrimeTuesday is going to be a weekly feature that will highlight some of the more colorful characters who found themselves on the wrong side of the law. The National Archives at Kansas City holds almost 75,000 inmate case files from Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. They are one of our most requested series of records, and probably one of the most popular.

We are going to begin with Leavenworth inmate number 6768, Frank Grigware. Mr. Grigware is probably one of the most notorious criminals in #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary history that you've never heard of. Why? Because he was one of the few - possibly the only - to escape from Leavenworth without ever being returned. Grigware was able to escape from Leavenworth in 1910, flee to Canada, and evade detection for 23 years. By 1933, when he was found, Grigware had established a new identity and was living as an upstanding citizen in the province of Alberta. An outpouring of support by Canadian citizens and the press influenced the U.S. Department of Justice to drop its extradition request in 1934. But Grigware was never able to return to the United States. He died a free man in 1977 at the age of 91. For more information about Grigware, the book "Leavenworth Train" by Joe Jackson is recommended. #truecrime #archivesofinstagram #leavenworthhistory #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #prisonhistory #mugshot #mugshots #trainrobber #trainrobbers #trainrobbery #escapedconvict

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Grigware, Frank, 6768.

Here's another one of our #awesomeletterheads featuring the Loftis Bros. & Company, from #chicagoillinois. The letter was sent to the warden of Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in 1925, and the company was seeking the warden's cooperation in collecting a debt from one of the prisoners.

The Loftis Bros. Company has a rather colorful history. The brothers, who were the company's namesake, consisted of Joseph, Samuel, and Clifford Loftis. In 1907, Samuel Loftis, the company's President, was shot in the arm by his brother Joseph, who was the Vice-President, during a company board meeting. A melee ensued whereby Joseph was subdued until police arrived. No one else was injured.
Joseph had learned of a plot concocted by Samuel, and Samuel's wife, to oust him from the company. Samuel did not deny the charge, and insisted that over the past several years Joseph had become an absentee business partner, spending much of his time drunk. Samuel did not press charges, but the motion of removing the Vice-President was carried forward.

In August 1920, Samuel Loftis died under mysterious circumstances. For several days, the #chicagotribune published articles concerning a murder theory and a mysterious woman. In the end, however, it was determined Samuel died of apoplexy. #awesomeletterhead #loftisbros #illinoishistory #chicagohistory #prisonhistory #leavenworthprison #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthhistory #diamondsareforever #diamondsareagirlsbestfriend @chicagotribune #archivesofinstagram

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Daly, James, No. 19835.

Advertisement from the April 1927 edition of Farm Life, a monthly periodical published in Spencer, Indiana. It urges citizens to buy garments that are "union made," and not to risk one's health by wearing garments "which may be contaminated by diseased prisoners." #leavenworthprison #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthhistory #prisonhistory #indianahistory #spencerindiana #laborhistory #unitedgarmentworkersofamerica #unionlabel #archivesofinstagram

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Hartman, Fred A. No. 24014.

| (#slideleft / #swipeleft) these are the mugshots of #williamwest & william #west. they are not related. they were both sent to #leavenworth (#leavenworthprison) at the same time in 19o3 & after some confusion, the staff understood they had two different #prisoners w/ the exact same name who looked exactly alike. they are part of the reason #fingerprints are now used as #identification & are also the reason we need #prisonreform. okay, #asyouwere.

The National Archives at Kansas City houses historical records related to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. The most popular series of Leavenworth records are the inmate case files, which date from 1895-1957. Inmate case files provide detailed information on the lives of individuals who were incarcerated. There are over 74,000 case files available.
The image above is the mugshot of Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary inmate no. 17431, Robert Stroud, otherwise known as The Birdman of Alcatraz. One of the most notorious criminals in American history, Stroud was incarcerated at Leavenworth long before he went to Alcatraz and earned his nickname. He died in 1963 while still in custody at the Federal Medical Center in Springfield, Missouri. #leavenworthfederalpenitentiary #leavenworthfederalprison #leavenworthprison #leavenworthhistory #mugshot #mugshots #prisonhistory #robertstroud #birdmanofalcatraz #archivesofinstagram #truecrime #truecrimetuesday #kansascityarchives

RG 129: Records of the Bureau of Prisons. Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Leavenworth, Kansas. Inmate Case Files, 1895-1957. Stroud, Robert. Inmate No. 17431.

Never seen it on a sunny day. #leavenworthprison #hubbyshometown

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