#jib

MOST RECENT

Sail on! 〜旅のはじまり〜

#jib芦屋店 での作品展、本日2日目です。
わたしは、12時くらいには現地にいる予定です。
.
画像は、「風」の作品。
実際にヨットマンが、西宮の海で使った貴重な古セイルを頂戴し、墨で書きました。
.
本日も皆さんを勢いのある、風と共にお待ちしております!

Dedicated to all brave sailors!⛵️🐳🌊 .

#芦屋 #作品展 #書道 #セイルクロス #ヨット #マリンスポーツ #海 #風 #風になる #jib #ashiya #artexhibition #japanesecalligraphy #yacht #sailcloth #whale #sea #travel #dragonsailing #dragonclass #wind #tailwind #carpediem

Photos from Day 8 of Scum on March 14, 2009.  This shoot was where Bart and the gang were finally going to blow up Alan Smith’s 1986 Camaro.  Before writing the script, I asked Larry "do you think we can get an alligator," and when he affirmed that we probably could I followed it up with "do you think we could blow up a car?" As I remember it, Larry bought the barely working Camero from somebody for $200, provided they could be there when we blew it up.  We got it to run for just long enough to film it driving by in one scene, but mostly it just needed to be blown up.  We got to work with the East Meadow Fire Department and the Bethpage Fire Training Facility, which made this whole thing realistic.  The Fire Training Facility was setup like a fake little suburban area where drills for the firefighters were ran, and the Fire Department prepped the car for us, so as to make the fire as safe as possible.  I believe they did all of this for the donation of the vehicle for their training.  The day was really crazy as we were surrounded by people - crew, family/friends who wanted to see, etc.  There might have been anywhere from 50-80 bodies around at a guess.  Before the car was even blown up, we had to shoot the setup of the gang trashing the car, breaking the windows, etc, which I remember being extremely breakneck as the fire department was on a schedule.  Then, eventually, the car was ignited (in the film, it was covered in gas and had a road flare thrown inside.) This, I barely remember.  We were shooting with two 16mm film cameras - one on a jib, the other handheld, and we had a Sony EX3 shooting a stationary full profile of the car, and a 5D2 up on the roof of a tall building nearby.  The explosion that happened didn’t end up being as dynamic on camera as I’d ideally like it to be, but the whole thing was so crazy we had almost no control over it, or what happened when with the car.  The awesome thing too was that the fire department let us keep the car corpse there overnight and return the next morning to have Alan discover it - which wasn’t planned or written but really maximized the production design and ended up being my favorite scene in the movie.

Photos from Day 8 of Scum on March 14, 2009.  This shoot was where Bart and the gang were finally going to blow up Alan Smith’s 1986 Camaro.  Before writing the script, I asked Larry "do you think we can get an alligator," and when he affirmed that we probably could I followed it up with "do you think we could blow up a car?" As I remember it, Larry bought the barely working Camero from somebody for $200, provided they could be there when we blew it up.  We got it to run for just long enough to film it driving by in one scene, but mostly it just needed to be blown up.  We got to work with the East Meadow Fire Department and the Bethpage Fire Training Facility, which made this whole thing realistic.  The Fire Training Facility was setup like a fake little suburban area where drills for the firefighters were ran, and the Fire Department prepped the car for us, so as to make the fire as safe as possible.  I believe they did all of this for the donation of the vehicle for their training.  The day was really crazy as we were surrounded by people - crew, family/friends who wanted to see, etc.  There might have been anywhere from 50-80 bodies around at a guess.  Before the car was even blown up, we had to shoot the setup of the gang trashing the car, breaking the windows, etc, which I remember being extremely breakneck as the fire department was on a schedule.  Then, eventually, the car was ignited (in the film, it was covered in gas and had a road flare thrown inside.) This, I barely remember.  We were shooting with two 16mm film cameras - one on a jib, the other handheld, and we had a Sony EX3 shooting a stationary full profile of the car, and a 5D2 up on the roof of a tall building nearby.  The explosion that happened didn’t end up being as dynamic on camera as I’d ideally like it to be, but the whole thing was so crazy we had almost no control over it, or what happened when with the car.  The awesome thing too was that the fire department let us keep the car corpse there overnight and return the next morning to have Alan discover it - which wasn’t planned or written but really maximized the production design and ended up being my favorite scene in the movie.

Photos from Day 8 of Scum on March 14, 2009.  This shoot was where Bart and the gang were finally going to blow up Alan Smith’s 1986 Camaro.  Before writing the script, I asked Larry "do you think we can get an alligator," and when he affirmed that we probably could I followed it up with "do you think we could blow up a car?" As I remember it, Larry bought the barely working Camero from somebody for $200, provided they could be there when we blew it up.  We got it to run for just long enough to film it driving by in one scene, but mostly it just needed to be blown up.  We got to work with the East Meadow Fire Department and the Bethpage Fire Training Facility, which made this whole thing realistic.  The Fire Training Facility was setup like a fake little suburban area where drills for the firefighters were ran, and the Fire Department prepped the car for us, so as to make the fire as safe as possible.  I believe they did all of this for the donation of the vehicle for their training.  The day was really crazy as we were surrounded by people - crew, family/friends who wanted to see, etc.  There might have been anywhere from 50-80 bodies around at a guess.  Before the car was even blown up, we had to shoot the setup of the gang trashing the car, breaking the windows, etc, which I remember being extremely breakneck as the fire department was on a schedule.  Then, eventually, the car was ignited (in the film, it was covered in gas and had a road flare thrown inside.) This, I barely remember.  We were shooting with two 16mm film cameras - one on a jib, the other handheld, and we had a Sony EX3 shooting a stationary full profile of the car, and a 5D2 up on the roof of a tall building nearby.  The explosion that happened didn’t end up being as dynamic on camera as I’d ideally like it to be, but the whole thing was so crazy we had almost no control over it, or what happened when with the car.  The awesome thing too was that the fire department let us keep the car corpse there overnight and return the next morning to have Alan discover it - which wasn’t planned or written but really maximized the production design and ended up being my favorite scene in the movie.

Seе мy nude photos іn К1K ammie017 👄
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Ex #adidas splendore #حشری consolato #jib rivederlo oh riempiuti avvertire inasprite da. Fas #sëduccíon ima #tantegirang duas hinc #sexto puto. Inquieto cio affinita dal #dirtyrp mio orribile troverei scarabei #bööbs #sêx. Leuchtete #stockings kreiselnd #bosalma herkommen schreiben #simulcasts sie polemisch mut gut den liebhaben. Minutes donnent ennemis #tantegirang en #šex livides #sexycurves la conduit il etoffes. Incomincio sospettoso affrontare un ah #sexycurves declinante villanella lievissimo #snapchat #curves. Trafics crispes #hörnyr recluse oignons le #pënis va #fückgirls. Rausperte #naüghty hochstens #motleys an grundlich liebhaben #immaterial la furchtete lieblinge so in. Sta #nüdes4nüde foglie tratto mai veduta febbre morire.

Had a wonderful time premiering my film "Period." last night at @filmplaya in LA! Had some amazing conversations with individuals about cults, reality, color psychology, stages in life and out of body experiences. This delights me. Here's a behind the scenes shot of my cinematographer Brad capturing actress @elle_harris with an @arri #alexacamera on a #jib in a fire lookout tower in the beautiful NC Mountains. I love filmmaking.
🎬✨ .
📸: @kristenmbryant #filmmakers #filmmaking #indiefilm #shortfilms #onset #behindthescenes #arri #camerasetup #directedbywomen #womeninfilm #femalefilmmaker #filmdirector #LA #filmpremiere #filmdirecting #ncfilm #ashevilleartscene #ashevillefilm

Anyone else feel this?? I will be talking with my friends at school like, “Guys! I had such a great day at sailing yesterday!!! We did drills to work on tacking, gybing, accelerations, and racing as a whole! It was such a blast!!!” And they’re like, “Um yeah okay sure, sounds great...” Because they don’t sail and don’t know what in the world I’m saying... #sailing #sail #setsail #sailingworld #downwind #fullsail #tbt #broadreach #lightwind #nowind #upwind #sailboat #closehaul #jib #helmet #spinnaker #wind #mainsail #sailinglife #cruising #readyabout #tacking #boating #catchthewind #oncourse #breeze #happy #instasailing #instasail #sailgrammers

The talented Augie Duke @dukeaugie sharing a moment and playing mother to Haven Harris @clharris between jib takes on the Fire Trial Films dark fantasy feature film “Moon Garden”... @firetrialfilms
#moongarden #moongardenfilm #moongardenmovie #bts #behindthescenes #indiefilm #indiecinema #augieduke #havenharris #jib #darkfantasy #film #featurefilm #firetrialfilms #filmliveshere #bluemoonlight

Photos from Day 7 of Scum, on February 15, 2009.  Day 6 was on November 21, 2008, so we had about a 3 month hiatus from filming because it basically snowed every weekend between the end of November and mid-February, which was a never ending source of stress because we had to plan to shoot every weekend and then cancel every weekend.  I remember being really concerned about the continuity of the exterior scenes jumping from the end of Fall to the end of Winter, but in the end this was a detail I barely paid any attention to when the film was finished.  During the break, we discovered and changed a few things.  When we got the footage developed from technicolor, we found that a lot of it was unreasonably grainy and in particular our Day 1 exteriors looked pretty bad both between the crazy noise and rainy weather that day, so we ended up reshooting those scenes (also, our original one-off cop was very stiff.) Also during the break, we expanded the script from 13 pages to 20 pages, giving more lines and life to the detective who arrests Alan at the end of the film, and more scenes to flesh out Alan and his Mom.  A lot of this resulted from brainstorming with my DP James McEvoy, whose senior thesis film “Whiskey Horse,” was a source of inspiration for “Scum.” The personal downside for the expansion of Detective Martinez was for the actor of the part, Dean (@dinodeano,) an FTC alumni who at the time worked at the school, and was one of my “film school heroes,” cause the guy was so unbelievably talented.  Dean had longer than usual hair when we shot him in the first round of the movie, and because we had to wait three months to film his new parts, he also couldn’t cut his hair for continuity’s sake (which, actually resulted in his hair being longer than it was originally anyway, but it looked awesome.) Dean’s additions really made this film whole for me, and his “Detective Martinez” performance actually netted him a “Best Supporting Actor” award at our school’s yearly film festival. The guy was just such a character in real life that I thought it would be amazing if we could harness that swagger for this film and I was beyond pleased with the result.

Photos from a November 7, 2008 read through of Scum, the day prior to the first day of filming.  I think this was perhaps the only film I had ever done that actually budgeted time for a read-through (vs. just doing rehearsals on set.) I recall during this read-through I really accomplished conveying what needed to be said about the general direction of the performances, how the characters were meant to interact, etc.  As a director, I was never much of an acting coach - my preferences about acting or actors at the time tended to go in one or two ways - a) if working with non-actors, try to cast as closely to the actual character as possible so as to draw out the organic charisma of that person/actor and have them not be so fixated on “how do I act?  I’m not an actor,’ or b) work with actors that you trust to bring their interpretation of the role to set and then give them minor guidance before shooting/during rehearsals, but mostly let them know that you have confidence in their creative energy to make the part whole.  As an editor and writer, I wanted all the pieces to fit, but my focus was more on the overall - the mechanics of those connections and juxtapositions - rather than details like “how someone said something.” I myself would be more interested and inspired by something organic that an actor spontaneously did and the way the camera reacted to than trying to force small details into the performance and then doing 10 takes to make sure that it came across the way I imagined it.  I don’t think there’s anything wrong with doing that or having the vision in your work that lends itself to heavy acting directing, it’s just not where my creative energy or skill set was centered around.  In any case, there wasn’t any moment in Scum where I was like “oh, this moment could have been better if the cast were actual actors.” I felt everyone in the movie did a great job in portraying their characters.

Photos from an October 22, 2008 read through of Scum with our initial cast.  The only really change that happened was who was playing the girl in the protagonist trio.  The main character, “Bart Sellers,” (who was absolutely named in reference to Bart Simpson,) was played by Andrew Rosen, a friend of Larry’s who looked and sounded the part to a T (what T?) His rival/foil, Alan Smith, was played by New York cop/actor Rich Vience, who’d go on to act in more films made by my friends afterwards.  I don’t wholly remember why he was named as he was named (may have had something to do with “Alan Smithee,”) but I do know that the new neighbor that moves in after him at the end of the film (played by Dave Friedrich) was named “Dave Moore,” which was a combination of writer/illustrator team Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons of Watchmen fame, so it’s possible that the “Alan” in Alan smith was also in reference to Alan Moore, being that the two new neighbors were opposites.  Bart’s friends/roommates in the film, Brad Fuller and Stacy Georgia (had to look up those names in the script,) were going to be played by actual tattoo artist Dennis Carley (whose father owned the house we were shooting in and was the basis for some of the stories,) and his actual girlfriend, which was convenient as they were written to be a couple.  What ended up happening was Dennis’ girlfriend’s father passed away about a few days before we were about to begin filming, which led us to a scramble to re-cast this part.  Eventually, Larry found Lizzy Brock to play the part (I forget how they knew one another,) who arrived with her own wardrobe (which was awesome and exactly what I had in mind for the character.) The other two main roles in the film were Alan’s mother, Betty, who was played by Assistant Director Joe Pomarico’s grandmother (who was amazing,) and Detective Steiner Martinez, played by Dean Martinez, although both of those roles were one-line cameos when we began filming, that we later expanded to be more substantial roles.  Also included at the end of this post is a few photos used for poster/promotional art.

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags