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Mirror Hall (Talar e Aineh)

The Mirror Hall is the most famous of the halls of the Golestan Palace. This relatively small hall is famous for its extraordinary mirror work. The hall was designed by Haj Abd ol Hossein Memar Bashi (Sanie ol Molk). Yahya Khan (Mowtamed ol Molk), who was the Minister of Architecture, was a consultant for the designer.
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Golnbad-e-Mina Planetarium is the largest 3-D planetarium in the Middle East, called Gonbad-e-Mina (Dome of Mina), located at Abbas-abad neighborhood of Tehran, is designed as a sphere showing all stars, planets and other celestial bodies for entertainment and educational purposes.
The planetarium, which is one of a kind and the largest in the Middle East, offers visitors a view of the sky projected on the ceiling. There is a projector at the center of the planetarium and separate projectors for the Sun, the Moon and other planets and stars. It is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation.
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Photo by @rahulsclicks ——————————-
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Fritillaria: The upside down tulip has either stooped before Iran
Fritillaria flower which comes in red, yellow, and sometimes orange spreads over Iran’s lands after winter, and makes the lands beautiful at springs. Its life span is short and flowers at the end of Farvardin (April) and cease flowering at early Ordibehesht(May) as rain falls begin. Fritillaria has an ancient trace in Iran and its role could be seen on the top of Sasanid pillars and Taghe Bostan museum next to the Sasanid king. This flower owns a specific position in Iranian literature. In one of the Iranian old stories named “Siavash” this flower becomes upside down in order to grieve on the heroes innocence and never stands up again. Therefore, because of this story it is also called the tears of Siavash. People from antiquity believed that its upside down position and frost falling down is because of this catastrophe. This plant is in the category of poisonous plants while it is still utilized as a tranquilizer for rheumatic and joint aches. It is also used in purgative process of liver and traditional remedies. For the first time this plant was taken to Austria by European tourists who has visited Iran. It was then planted in royal families’ gardens, and from 19th century became common in Netherlands plant growing industry. As it was globalized it influenced many of the great artists and their works like Goethe. Therefore its beauty was granted to all mankind.
This generous plant which only lives for three weeks is magnificently beautiful and grants its beauty to every one. It is some how like seeing heaven when you open your eyes and see thousands and thousands of this flowers and silence knowing that no human being has ever planted them. This plant grows in mountainous regions of Iran and spreads wildly over Iran’s west part of Iran and dyes Zargros Mountains. You can see that this plant is most of all dense in Fritillaria lands of Chelgard region located in Chehar Mahal Bakhtiari province.
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Photo by @studiohosseinshafinia ——————————-
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Naqsh-e Jahan Square, also known as Meidan Emam, is a square situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran. Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. It is 160 metres (520 ft) wide by 560 metres (1,840 ft) long (an area of 89,600 square metres (964,000 sq ft)). It is also referred to as Shah Square or Imam Square. The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque is situated on the eastern side of this square and at the northern side Keisaria gate opens into the Isfahan Grand Bazaar. Today, Namaaz-e Jom'eh (the Muslim Friday prayer) is held in the Shah Mosque.
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Photo by @hobograph —————————————-
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Tthananid is a Thai travel blogger who visited Iran in 2016, she created this movie after her trip, watch the movie and see Iran from her point of view.
Thank you Tthananid for sharing your professional movie @tthananid
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Ta’arof is a Persian word that has no English equivalent, referring to the art of etiquette ubiquitous in everyday Iranian life. “You go first,” says Mr A as he meets Mr B at the doorstep, as they try to enter a building. “No, it’s not possible, you go first,” Mr B insists in response. Ta’arof dictates a ritual that may see them both waiting for a couple of unnecessary minutes before one steps forward to enter.
It is an etiquette that is seen almost in all aspects of Iranian life, from hosts insisting on guests taking more food from the table, to the exchanges in the bazaar. “How much is this carpet?” asks Ms A after choosing her favourite in the shop. “It’s worthless, you can just take it,” responds the seller, quite disingenuously.

Although Ms A in reality cannot take the carpet out of the shop without paying for it, the seller might insist up to three times that she should just do that, until the amount of the price is finally mentioned.

The awkward exchanges may have originated out of politeness; ultimately, they may work to the seller’s favour, as the buyer feels a certain obligation to respond to such deference with a purchase, even if the final price is more than she expected.

Another example: you are walking with a friend and you end up doing Ta’arof, asking him to come to yours for lunch, even though you don’t have anything prepared and you don’t really want him to accept.

The friend insists out of Ta’arof that he wouldn’t come because he knows you’re tired and doesn’t want to be a burden, even though deep down he really wants to have lunch at your place. “Oh, don’t Ta’arof,” you say in a Ta’arof asking your friend not to Ta’arof. He ends up accepting your reluctant Ta’arof. You’re a bit irked, but you’ll have to be all smiles. Not all Taa’rofs are insincere; some are, some aren’t. You’d Ta’arof even if you badly want something, saying you don’t want it; you’d Ta’arof if you really hate something, pretending you want it. Saeed Kamali Dehghan - the guardian ————————————-
Photo by @eli_naz1985 ————————————-
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Masjed-e Nasir Al Molk

One of the most elegant and most photographed pieces of architecture in southern Iran, the Pink Mosque was built at the end of the 19th century and its coloured tiling (an unusually deep shade of blue) is exquisite. There are some particularly fine muqarnas in the small outer portal and in the northern iwan, but it is the stained glass, carved pillars and polychrome faience of the winter prayer hall that dazzle the eye when the sun streams in.
The mosque attracts most visitors early in the morning (9am to 11am is best) when the hall and its Persian carpets are illuminated with a kaleidoscope of patterned flecks of light. It makes for a magical experience – and an irresistible photograph.
A museum in the opposite prayer hall opens into the Gav Cha (Cow Well), where cows were used to raise water from the underground qanat. The structure has survived numerous earthquakes, due in part to its construction using flexible wood as struts within the walls – look for the wooden bricks in the iwan columns. The rose-pink floral tiles are a signature feature of Shiraz.
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Photo by @mahmoudkhorasani —————————————- #iran #iranvisitorsclicks #iranvisitors #iran_visitors_clicks #mosque #nasirolmolk #shiraz #colorful #colorfulmosque #travel #tourist #tourism

The Tabi'at Bridge (Persian: Pole Tabiat‎ which literally means Nature Bridge) is the largest pedestrian overpass built in Tehran, Iran. The 270-metre (890 ft) bridge connects two public parks—Taleghani Park and Abo-Atash Park—by spanning Modarres Expressway, one of the main highways in northern Tehran. The word tabiat means "nature" in the Persian language.
The bridge was designed by Leila Araghian and Alireza Behzadi/ Diba Tensile Architecture. It has won several awards, including the Popular Choice Prize for Highways & Bridges from the Architizer A+ Awards, a global architectural competition based in New York, and the 2016 Aga Khan Award for Architecture.
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Tar (Persian: تار‎; Azerbaijani: tar) is an Iranian long-necked, waisted instrument, shared by many cultures and countries including Iran, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, and others near the Caucasus region. The word tār means "string" in Persian, and is also related to the names of the guitar, sitar, setar (سه‌تار, "three strings") and dutar (دوتار‎, "two strings").
It was invented in the 18th century[6][7] and has since become one of the most important musical instruments in Iran and the Caucasus, particularly in Persian classical music, and the favoured instrument for radifs.

In 2012, the craftsmanship and performance art of the Azerbaijani tar was added to the UNESCO's List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.
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Video by @mahmoudkhorasani ————————————
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The Palace of Darius in Susa was a palace complex in Susa, Iran, a capital of the Achaemenid Empire. The construction was conducted parallel to that of Persepolis. Man-power and raw materials from various parts of the empire contributed to its construction. It was once destroyed by fire and was partially restored later. Little has remained from this important complex.
The palace complex was constructed by the Achaemenid king Darius I in Susa, his favorite capital. Construction works continued under Darius I's son, Xerxes, and to a lesser extent, Artaxerxes I (465–424 BC) and Darius II (423–404 BC). Artaxerxes II (404–358 BC) partially restored the palace as it was destroyed by a fire during the reign of Artaxerxes I fifty years earlier. The palace was captured and plundered by the invading Macedonians under Alexander the Great in December 330 BC.

The site of the palace has been greatly damaged during the past seven decades.
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Photo by @mahmoudkhorasani ———————————-
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Asalem-Khalkhal: Dreamy Road North of Iran
Undoubtedly the mountainous Asalem to Khalkhal road is one of the most gorgeous Iranian roads bridging two northern provinces of Gilan and Ardebil together. When someone goes through this provoking motorway, he feels the paradise is under his feet.
It is said that Asalem to Khalkhal Road is one of the most beautiful and spectacular roads in Iran. It is a combination of two contradictory points; the highland forest and plain together. This 70-kilometers-long road lies from the sea level to 3000 meters high, and purely depicts splendors of the motherland and its natural tourist attractions.
The road is in fact a route lies inside green velvet textile of the countryside, goes up to the heaven where a carpet of fog is beautifying the scent of fresh flora and fauna. When someone gets lost in this real-life dream, it is the time that he feels regeneration inside.
Interestingly, Asalem to Khalkhal road is one of the neglected Iran’s tourist attractions that most of the people are not aware of it. If you feel enthusiastic to see Asalem to Khalkhal Road from close, where the baking and humid sea-level atmosphere changes to a mountainous winter fridge.
Asalem is a city in and the capital of Asalem District, in Talesh County, Gilan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 3,347, in 827 families.
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Photo by @studiohosseinshafinia ——————————- #iran #iran_visitors_clicks #travel #roadtrip #tourist #tourism #tourism_iran #ardebil #khalkhaal #trip #nature #asalem #iranvisitors #iranvisitorsclicks

Aghazadeh Mansion and its windcatcher was built during the Qajar Dynasty and is located in Abarkooh, Iran. This building is registered as a national historical monument in Iran and since 2015, the facade of this building has been portrayed on the 20,000 rial bills.

The windcatcher in this mansion is regarded as one of the finest examples of windcatchers in the world. The main windcatcher of this mansion is 18 meters high and covers an area of 18 square meters. There are 19 air-adjusting vents in the windcatcher, which are internally connected to the second windcatcher. This windcatcher can do the air-adjustment even if there is no wind blowing. Unlike most windcatcgers, this one is a two-story structure.

The mansion features a cross-shaped northern room facing a central courtyard with a large stone pool in the middle. The mansion has three different sections, enabling residents to live in different parts of the house based on the weather conditions in various seasons.

The pergola in Aghazadeh Mansion has been decorated by muqarnas to let the light get in the building easily and make it look brighter.
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Photo by @studiohosseinshafinia ———————————-
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Qajar Bath is one of the oldest and biggest public bathes in Qazvin, which was built on the order of the Safavid ruler Shah Abbas (1571-1629) by one of his commanders. The bathhouse includes a changing room (sarbineh) and a hot chamber (garm khaneh), and had a section for use by women and one for men. There is a big octagonal pool (howz) in the middle of the sarbineh, which has six elevated platforms where customers once sat for rest. In 2000, in Qajar Bath was turned into Qazvin Anthropology Museum and now displays wax figures showing the customs, ethnicities and different vocations of Qazvin.
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Photo by @mahmoudkhorasani ——————————-
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Hijab in Iran for Visitors
Obeying Islamic rules including Hijab or Islamic dress-code is necessary in Iran. However these rules are not observed very strict, especially for tourists and foreigners. You must not worry about maintaining your hijab , since in times you have forgotten about it, the maximum penalty will be a request (usually in a kind way) to make it correct.

There are some minimum requirements for foreign women dress-code in public places but generally the law is loose when it comes to tourists. Iranian are hospitable people.

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The Caravanserai of Sa'd al-Saltaneh is a large Caravanserai located in the city of Qazvin in Qazvin Province of Iran.

Built during the Qajar era, the caravanserai is one of Persia's best preserved urban caravanserais. The builder (patron) of this large caravanserai was a person by the name Sa'd al-Saltaneh Isfahani, for whom the caravanserai is named after.

The caravanserai is built on a square plan, has 4 iwans facing a courtyard. The interiors are decorated with Muqarnas and Rasmi bandi.

The Hujrehs, or the rooms for the travelers, are situated one meter above the courtyard ground level. The Hashti behind the southern iwan has the largest gonbad, with 4 semi-domes adjacent to it.

The eastern-western axis of the Hashti is called Dalan-i Qeisariyeh (دالان قيصريه ) or "Caesar's Hall", and the north-south axis of the Caravanserai's Hashti is named Dalan-i Ghahremani (دالان قهرماني) or "Ghahremani Hall". The former is connected to the "Bazaar of Vizir" of the city.

There are also two smaller courtyards in the east and west of the Caravanserai. —————————————-
Photo by @mahmoudkhorasani —————————————-
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Parisa Firoozi (Music & Video director)

She made this music video for Iran Football Team in World Cup 2018, her musical instrument is NeyAnban,
Ney-anbān (Persian: نی انبان ‎, numerous Latin spellings), is a type of bagpipe which is popular in southern Iran, especially around Bushehr. The term ney-anban literally means "bag pipe", but more specifically can refer to a type of droneless double-chantered bagpipes played in Southern Iran. This is similar to the Bahrainian jirba played by ethnic Iranians in the Persian Gulf islands.

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Viva Iran
🎊🎉🎈🎊🎉🎈🎊🎉🎈
Congratulations to all Iranian

Wishing all success and happiness
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When Bourdain visited Iran in 2014, he said he came back with a confusing picture of the country, as what he experienced was so at odds with what he understood of the country from the vision portrayed by the US government.

He wrote: "What we saw, what we came back with, is a deeply confusing story. Because the Iran you see from the inside, once you walk the streets of Tehran, once you meet Iranians, is a very different place than the Iran you know from the news. Nowhere else I've been has the disconnect been so extreme between what one sees and feels from the people and what one sees and hears from the government." He went on: "I have said that Iran is the most outgoingly warm, pro-American place we've ever shot, and that's true: In Tehran, in spite of the fact that you are standing in front of a giant, snarling mural that reads 'DEATH TO AMERICA!,' we found that you will usually be treated better by strangers — meaning smiles, offers of assistance, curious attempts to engage in limited English, greetings and expressions of general good will — than anywhere in Western Europe."
He added: "This is not a black-and-white world — as much as people would like to portray it as such. That's not an apology for anything. I'm just saying that the brief, narrow slice of Iran we give you in this episode of Parts Unknown is only one part of a much deeper, multihued, very old, and very complicated story. Like anything as ancient and as beautiful as the Persian Empire, it's worth, I think, looking further. But it's also a place that can warm your heart one day and break it the next." Iranians, including some living in other parts of the world, praised Bourdain on Twitter for capturing their country in a different light to the usual Western media reports and government rhetoric.
#iran #iranvisitors #iranvisitorsclicks #iran_visitors_clicks #anthonybourdain #tehran #esfahan #isfahan #shiraz

When Bourdain visited Iran in 2014, he said he came back with a confusing picture of the country, as what he experienced was so at odds with what he understood of the country from the vision portrayed by the US government.

He wrote: "What we saw, what we came back with, is a deeply confusing story. Because the Iran you see from the inside, once you walk the streets of Tehran, once you meet Iranians, is a very different place than the Iran you know from the news. Nowhere else I've been has the disconnect been so extreme between what one sees and feels from the people and what one sees and hears from the government." He went on: "I have said that Iran is the most outgoingly warm, pro-American place we've ever shot, and that's true: In Tehran, in spite of the fact that you are standing in front of a giant, snarling mural that reads 'DEATH TO AMERICA!,' we found that you will usually be treated better by strangers — meaning smiles, offers of assistance, curious attempts to engage in limited English, greetings and expressions of general good will — than anywhere in Western Europe."
He added: "This is not a black-and-white world — as much as people would like to portray it as such. That's not an apology for anything. I'm just saying that the brief, narrow slice of Iran we give you in this episode of Parts Unknown is only one part of a much deeper, multihued, very old, and very complicated story. Like anything as ancient and as beautiful as the Persian Empire, it's worth, I think, looking further. But it's also a place that can warm your heart one day and break it the next." Iranians, including some living in other parts of the world, praised Bourdain on Twitter for capturing their country in a different light to the usual Western media reports and government rhetoric.
#iran #iranvisitors #iranvisitorsclicks #iran_visitors_clicks #anthonybourdain #tehran #esfahan #isfahan #shiraz

Tehran is the capital of Iran and Tehran Province. With a population of around 8.8 million in the city and 15 million in the larger metropolitan area of Greater Tehran, Tehran is the most populous city in Iran and Western Asia, and has the second-largest metropolitan area in the Middle East. It is ranked 29th in the world by the population of its metropolitan area.
Tehran was first chosen as the capital of Iran by Agha Mohammad Khan of the Qajar dynasty in 1796, in order to remain within close reach of Iran's territories in the Caucasus, before being separated from Iran as a result of the Russo-Iranian Wars, and to avoid the vying factions of the previously ruling Iranian dynasties. The capital has been moved several times throughout the history, and Tehran is the 32nd national capital of Iran. Large scale demolition and rebuilding began in the 1920s, and Tehran has been a destination for mass migrations from all over Iran since the 20th century.

Tehran is home to many historical collections, including the royal complexes of Golestan, Sa'dabad, and Niavaran, where the two last dynasties of the former Imperial State of Iran were seated. Tehran's most famous landmarks include the Azadi Tower, a memorial built under the reign of Mohammad Reza Shah of the Pahlavi dynasty in 1971 to mark the 2,500th year of the foundation of the Imperial State of Iran, and the Milad Tower, the world's sixth-tallest self-supporting tower which was completed in 2007. The Tabiat Bridge, a newly-built landmark, was completed in 2014.
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Photo by @saeed_hasanabbasi
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