#inequality

43662 posts

TOP POSTS

In Canada, geography is destiny: Your financial future, to a surprisingly large degree, depends on the place in Canada where you happen to grow up. 🔺
That reality is revealed on this map and our accompanying set of interactive graphics, produced using a new analysis of millions of Canadians’ income data, the result of years of work by economist Miles Corak. 🔺
If a region is bright green, there is a high chance that kids who grew up in that region will, by the time they’re in their 40s, be in a higher-income group than their parents were at the same age (wherever those offspring end up living). 🔺
In the bright red areas, the majority of children grow up to have adult financial success levels similar to, or less than, their parents. 🔺
To find out more about how where you grew up affects your income in adulthood, follow the link in our bio. 🔺
(✒: Doug Saunders and Tom Cardoso)
#dataviz #datajournalism #inequality #Canada

Sounds of inequality 😢#hope#tehran#enghelab#oldman#inequality

#MandelaDay is a day to reflect upon the issues of: #hunger, #health and #inequality

Une panne d'électricité laisse l'aveugle indifférent.
#telaviv #israel #indifference #inequality #picture #photography #color #street #life

The year is 2017, yet still, a woman’s dollar is only worth 80 cents as compared to a man’s.

The Epoch Herald highlights the ongoing womens' wage gap problem, presenting statistics as evidence. (Link in the bio.)

#editorial #women #inequality #wagegap #theepochherald

This evening, the International Inequalities Institute hosts a panel who are discussing how to change the current narratives surrounding inequality. The speakers are Jee Kim, Professor Amartya Sen and Katy Wright #LSEIII2017 #inequality #Oxfam #AtlanticFellows #partofLSE

@Regrann from @civicdirect - People had to #fight for #goodwages. With the #levels of #inequality we now face, we #need #unions, #fairwage #laws and #highertaxes for the #wealthy to #rein in the #excesses of our #economic #system and to #create a more #level #playingfield. Thanks to @labor411 for this. #knowyourhistory #pastisprologue

MOST RECENT

Another day, another tweet that boggles the mind.

Modern Times Beer Founder Jacob McKean: "One way I pledge to keep this industry awesome is by never selling my brewery to Big Beer. There will likely come a time when I’m tired of carrying the weight of so much responsibility. But when that time comes, I’m not going to screw the people who made my success possible in the first place. That would be an unethical choice I could never be proud of. I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to everyone in this industry, and when it comes time for me to do something else, I refuse to throw a hand grenade over my shoulder on my way out the door. ...I’ve certainly given this a great deal of thought. What I learned...is that if the employees are not passionate about what the company makes and how it operates, they won’t see themselves as having a future there. Even a 100% Employee Stock Ownership Plan does not have to offer any meaningful governance or management role to employees, but the consequence of doing that is that the company’s owners aren’t invested in the company’s direction. That’s a formula for a bad culture, which can lead to a sale. We plan to do the opposite." Congrats, again, to Modern Times for beginning the transition to 100% employee ownership AND management. Oh, and for this dank I.P.A. as well.

Newest on Former Princess, "The Height of Inequity" is live now. I wrote this after reading an article about how restaurants can make it an obligation for female servers to wear high heels. That pissed me off a bit. I love a good pair of heels as much as the next girl, but they're not comfy. Men don't have an equivalent, why should women be required to wear them? They don't enhance someone's ability to do their job, and that's the bottom line. .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#formerprincess #musingsofamillennial #instablogger #bloggersofig #poetryblog #poetry #poem #feminism #whyineedfeminism #yesallwomen #women #inequality #nogirlsnoglory #writing #writersofinstagram #writerscommunity #writersofig #poetsofinstagram #creativewriting #creativepreneur #womenwriters #females

"Why don't we start businesses that create purpose?
Introducing the truly innovative and thought provoking Prasoon Kumar, Co-Founder & CEO of billionBricks (bB): Urban Planner and Architect w/ over 10 years of experience in design firms across #India, #USA, #HongKong & #Singapore.
-
-
In 2013, he founded bB, which is a one-of-a-kind non-profit innovation studio that uses design as its primary tool to solve one of the most pressing global problems: homelessness. He leads multidisciplinary teams and engages with stakeholders and partners across various sectors to provide shelter and infrastructure solutions for the homeless and vulnerable which are scalable, sustainable, and able to create opportunities for communities to emerge out of poverty.
-
-
@billionbricks @kumarprasoon  @creativemornings.sg #prasoonkumar #billionbricks #SGisCreative #CMEquality #creativemornings #inequality#equality  #endpoverty #homelessness #architecture #design #urban #weatherhyde #inspirational #shelter #changetheworld #urbanplanning #centre42 #rehabilitation #inspiring #leadership #shelter #infrastructure

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instagood #instadaily

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instagood #instadaily

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instadaily #instagood

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instagood #instadaily

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instagood #instadaily

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instadaily #instagood

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instagood #instadaily

“The first act of civil disobedience doesn’t come easily to most people. We are raised to be obedient; it requires considerable discernment to decide what matters enough to justify going against our sociable inclinations to conform, to not make waves, as my beloved Dad put it. The phone or the doorbell rings, and we answer it. The Star-Spangled Banner strikes up at a baseball game, and we rise to salute the flag and strain to reach the impossible notes of a ghastly anthem with its “bombs bursting in air,” its references to fire, destruction, blood, and the “pollution” of our enemies, the “terror of flight and the gloom of the grave.” But sing it we do, on cue. Then, suddenly, there is a tipping point that brings one to their senses… Some ordinary people began to sit tight during the singing of the national anthem in our ballparks. The bench sitters were pelted with hot dogs and mustard, with snow cones and soft ice cream. They were told to stand up like men, even if they were women. They were called traitors, scum, cowards, and Commies, and told to get out of America. But, like Horton the Elephant, they sat and they sat. They refused to remove their baseball caps or place their right hands over their hearts in a display of patriotic loyalty. That took a lot of moral courage.” Excerpt from Anthropologist as Court Jester: Civil Disobedience and the People’s Cafe by Nancy Scheper-Hughes Artists: Osha Neumann, O’Brien Thiele, Hannah Kransberg, and Daniel Galvez Photo Credit: Wally Gobetz via Flickr @ucberkeley #Berkeley #PeoplesPark #justice #anthropology #anthro #Catholicism #liberation #theology #homelessness #Kroeber #socialjustice #inequality #religion #california #boomcalifornia #instadaily #instagood

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags