#hurricanematthew

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AVEDA #earthmonth2018 is currently ongoing but what does it mean? In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, making sure to provide clean water and support other clean water projects in Haiti is in focus for the AVEDA 2018 earth month campaign. Please visit my site to read more about the campaign, how to protect the rare Haitian Vetiver and what YOU can do as a consumer to care for the world we live in! Link in Bio. 🌱(*) #aveda #avedaearthmonth #carefortheworldwelivein #shampuredryshampoo #shampurethermaldryconditioner #avedamiddleeast #esteelaudercompanies #haircare #vetiver #hurricanematthew @avedamiddleeast @aveda @elisacasans @lienemende @georgia_hosny @esteelaudercompanies @juwana_lj #organicbeauty @hannahrave

Timo Tao, a Hatian migrant who typically leads services at the Templo Embajadores de Jesus in Tijuana, Mexico, prays in the early morning before leaving for work.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus #prayer

Jacob, a migrant from Haiti, stands in the Templo Embajadores de Jesus in Tijuana, Mexico. He and his family fled the destruction caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016, arived in Tijuana in February 2017. He has been out of work since arriving in Tijuana and has been unable to make or save any money for his family.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew

Maria C Acevedo #hurricanematthew

I love this little guy!! He’s the best!!#hurricanematthew#littleriver#uncleg

Samuel Louis, 32, made the trip from Haiti to Tijuana, Mexico, in 2017. No one journeyed with him. He was studying psychology in Haiti and hopes to continue doing so now that he is in Mexico. “I want to make a family here,” he says, “because I’m all alone”. Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

Mattresses line the walls of the Templo Embajadoros de Jesus church in Tijuana, Mexico. On the edges of the church hall, migrant families continue to try to live in increasingly cramped quarters.
Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

Wilson, a two-month-old baby boy, sits on his father's lap in the Templo Embajadores de Jesus, a church and shelter for Haitian migrants. Wilson was born in Mexico while his parents were making their way by land from Haiti to the U.S. border in Tijuana, Mexico.
Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

#Repost @opensocietyfoundations with @get_repost
・・・
Jan, a Haitian migrant and mother, cuddles with her two-year-old daughter Angela in the Templo Embajadores de Jesus in Tijuana, Mexico. It’s been eight months since Jan and her family came to Tijuana. Despite the long wait, they still hope to make it to the United States—partially because the work they’ve been able to find in Tijuana has been so low-paying that they’ve been unable to save money or send it back to their loved ones in Haiti.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus #lifelibertyandthepursuitofhappiness

Posted @withrepost@opensocietyfoundations Wilmer, a Haitian migrant who has been stuck in Tijuana for 10 months, does voluntary construction work at the Templo Embajadores de Jesus church in Tijuana, Mexico. Wilmer is a loner here; he works construction jobs and either saves the money he earns or sends it to his family back home. He plans to stay in Tijuana rather than attempt to enter the United States.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

Wilmer, a Haitian migrant who has been stuck in Tijuana for 10 months, does voluntary construction work at the Templo Embajadores de Jesus church in Tijuana, Mexico. Wilmer is a loner here; he works construction jobs and either saves the money he earns or sends it to his family back home. He plans to stay in Tijuana rather than attempt to enter the United States.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

Rosnet Pierre, a migrant in Tijuana, Mexico from Haiti, lies with his wife Ruth on their family's mattress in one of the temporary housing units at the Templo Embajadores de Jesus church. Rosnet says his wife and daughter flew to Brazil and then travelled by land for three months from Brazil to Tijuana, where they've been stuck for 8 months. The family cannot earn enough to save and send money back to Haiti and still hold out hope of going to the United States. They plan to send their eldest daughter ahead, hoping that she doesn’t get deported at immigration.

Project by Lauren DeCicca @deciccaphoto.
Following the destruction of Hurricane Matthew, there has been an influx of migrants traveling to the United States from Haiti via the border separating San Diego and Tijuana. In 2016, then-President Barack Obama reinstated the deportation of undocumented Haitian migrants and put into effect other policies intended to dissuade migrants from coming to America. But the migrants still came, many of them hoping to stay by the border until the United States implemented more humane policies. The Temploros Embajadores de Jesus, in Tijuana, Mexico, is one of the few safe spaces where these people can wait. The church, which opened its doors in August 2016, is run by Pastor Gustavo Banda with his wife, Caida Guillen. They’ve seen thousands of migrants pass through their church, and they’re working with volunteers to help build more permanent homes for this displaced community.

#opensociety #haitianmigrants #haiti #ayiti #everydaymigration #nooneisillegal #refugeeswelcome #climatechange #climatemigration #hurricanematthew #shelterisahumanright #embajadoresdejesus

Current condition of my house! 👋
#hurricanematthew #newlife

Que viagem 🙏🏻 sdds desse role!

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