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Sometimes, you've just got to marvel at the fact that 18 grown men were needed to fully operate the Sturmpanzerwagen A7V, and that 18 grown men could even fit inside such a small space in the first place. In fact 18 was actually the MINIMUM amount of people needed to operate Germany's first ever tank. Astoundingly as many as 24 people could fit inside the Sturmpanzerwagen. Comparably, the British "Mark" tanks required a crew of just eight. The photo here is dated 1918. Swipe left for a cutaway of the A7V showing just some of its crew and their respective positions.

DUEL IN THE SKIES • XX
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Not your typical Pacific War dogfight.
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Captured in artwork by Jack Fellows is a duel between a USAAF B-17 and a Type 97 Kawanishi H6K4 "Mavis" Long Range Flying Boat of the Imperial Japanese Navy, somewhere over the southwest pacific, October 23, 1942. Given that it's dated, the painting most likely depicts an actual event, possibly one that was recalled by an American veteran.
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During the Pacific War, despite the vastness of such a theatre, it actually wasn't that uncommon for opposing long range aircraft to run into each other—and then fight it out. I couldn't find any more info on the encounter in the artwork, but one man that did engage in one such duel and lived to talk about it in his memoirs was Lieutenant Tsuneo Hitsuji of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Lieutenant Hitsuji was with the 851st Kōkūtai (“Air Group”), operating the Kawanishi H6K Flying Boats out of the Shortland Islands just south of Bougainville in November 1942.
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At this time, the campaign for Guadalcanal and indeed control of the Solomons was intense, and the 851st Kōkūtai was experiencing almost daily loses of Flying Boats to unknown enemy activities. The Imperial Japanese crews had apparently not survived long enough to communicate back to base critical information about who was attacking them.
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The mystery was eventually solved on November 21, 1942, when Lt. Hitsuji, who was commanding a H6K Flying Boat on patrol about 150 nautical miles south of Guadalcanal, ran into the problem: a USAAF B-17. The encounter didn't last long, and Hitsuji’s crew actually managed to drive it off damaging one engine with 20mm cannon fire from the tail turret. But it wasn't over. Not long later this first clash, they encountered another B-17, possibly one that had been radioed for help. This second duel was deadlier, with the faster B-17 making at least 6 passes against Hitsuji’s Flying Boat. Both sides exchanged intense gun fire, before the B-17 withdrew into a rain squall, and headed toward Guadalcanal—trailing gasoline.
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[continued..⬇️]

T92 Howitzer Motor Carriage was a self-propelled howitzer developed by the United States of America during World War II. They were not built in significant numbers and the war ended before they could be used in combat. Rate of fire was 1 round per minute and speed 15 miles per hour, Armor was 25 mm and the Armament 240 mm howitzer M1.
#history #war #warhistory #warphotography #military #militaryhistory #army #historychannel #historygeek #historybuff #historian #historiansunion #tanks #usarmy #usmilitary #worldwar2 #ww2 #wwii #retro #classic #vintage #photography #picoftheday

Quick fact!

This photo taken by George Strock of Life Magazine shows three American soldiers laying dead in the sand during the Battle of Buna-Gona, with one of the soldiers shown covered with maggots. Buna Beach, Papua New Guinea. Either December 31st 1942 or January 1st or 2nd 1943. The US Office of Censorship only permitted the media to publish American dead as blanket-covered bodies or in flag draped coffins, mostly due to fear of Americans being demoralized and due to a policy of refusing to show photos of any dead American GIs on the battlefields, so at first this photo was blacklisted and denied publishing. The same principle also applied to what reporters could be allowed to write, and there was severe restrictions. General Douglas MacArthur even threatened to court-martial any soldier who dared to give a reporter an interview without official permission. Life Magazine Washington correspondent Cal Whipple knew that this photo would give a much-needed dose of reality to Americans on the homefront, and as he was assigned to the newly-constructed Pentagon he began to press for the photo to be published. Elmer Davis, the Director of the United States Office of War Information, also agreed that the censorship needed to be loosened, and the two soon pressed their cases to whoever would listen. The case eventually went to the White House, and after some persuasion President Franklin D. Roosevelt himself finally approved this photo to be published because he was worried the American public was growing complacent about World War II, and its horrific toll worldwide. It was published in Life on September 20th 1943, and although it did help with war bond sales it did give a hit to recruitment in the United States, and many Americans were furious at Life Magazine for publishing this and many accused them of morbid sensationalism. Nevertheless, it became an instant icon for war photography, and it is one of the most famous images ever taken in warfare.

I pretty much always enjoy @worldwarincolor posts, whether it be on here or on Facebook. Great captions, credit given to colorizers, and a diverse spread of WWII topics. Not too long ago, before they joined Instagram, many less-reputable history pages on IG would copy/paste their content without credit, and post it as their own. Hopefully those days are over; check out @worldwarincolor and follow along for some great content, both here and Facebook. They're the real deal and it's always beneficial to see these posts straight from the source. Here's their caption for this one of the battleship Schleswig-Holstein:

Repost from @worldwarincolor - On September 1, 1939, at 0448 local time, Germany began its invasion of Poland, starting World War II; the German Battleship SMS Schleswig-Holstein, positioned in the port of Danzig, moored close to the Polish ammunition depot at Westerplatte under the guise of a ceremonial visit in August, suddenly opened broadside salvo fire on the Polish garrison held by 182 soldiers and 27 civilian reservists.

These shots were the signal for ground troops to begin their assault on the installation though the first German ground attack in the Battle of Westerplatte was repelled shortly thereafter. A second assault began later that morning, again supported by SMS Schleswig-Holstein, though it too had failed to break into the installation by around noon. (Colorised by Mikołaj Kaczmarek from Poland)
https://www.facebook.com/KolorHistorii/

Haven't done a shoutout in a while, but these guys deserve more eyes on their content through their page rather than by proxy through others. Keep IG honest!

George Davey was sentenced to one month’s hard labor in Wandsworth Prison in 1872 for stealing two rabbits, he was ten years old. #london
#thehistorywire #historynerd #historic #historybuff #historyinpictures #historical #historylover #history

Anyone else watching @pbs The Vietnam War?? Totally fascinating and this snippet blew my mind - America's goals for the war: 70% Don't get humiliated. 😵🤤😱 10% help the South Vietnamese. ⁉️🙈🙉⁉️
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I'm also blown away by how many opportunities early on there were to get out and everyone knew it was hopeless but just couldn't appear "weak on communism". So sad. 🙁 .
Still over 10 hours so go and it's only up to 1967!
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@vietnamwarpbs .
#HistoryTeacher #Vietnam #VietnamWar #Historybuff

Welcome back to another #NowandThen Thursday! This week, we’re highlighting the Duke and Duchess of Windsor dressed for a winter stroll around the Queen Mary’s lofty Sun Deck. While aboard, the Duchess was known to phone the Bridge every morning while at sea and ask the officer of the watch what the weather was going to be like through the day so that she could plan their extensive wardrobe.🚢

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This photo taken by George Strock of Life Magazine shows three American soldiers laying dead in the sand during the Battle of Buna-Gona, with one of the soldiers shown covered with maggots. Buna Beach, Papua New Guinea. Either December 31st 1942 or January 1st or 2nd 1943. The US Office of Censorship only permitted the media to publish American dead as blanket-covered bodies or in flag draped coffins, mostly due to fear of Americans being demoralized and due to a policy of refusing to show photos of any dead American GIs on the battlefields, so at first this photo was blacklisted and denied publishing. The same principle also applied to what reporters could be allowed to write, and there was severe restrictions. General Douglas MacArthur even threatened to court-martial any soldier who dared to give a reporter an interview without official permission. Life Magazine Washington correspondent Cal Whipple knew that this photo would give a much-needed dose of reality to Americans on the homefront, and as he was assigned to the newly-constructed Pentagon he began to press for the photo to be published. Elmer Davis, the Director of the United States Office of War Information, also agreed that the censorship needed to be loosened, and the two soon pressed their cases to whoever would listen. The case eventually went to the White House, and after some persuasion President Franklin D. Roosevelt himself finally approved this photo to be published because he was worried the American public was growing complacent about World War II, and its horrific toll worldwide. It was published in Life on September 20th 1943, and although it did help with war bond sales it did give a hit to recruitment in the United States, and many Americans were furious at Life Magazine for publishing this and many accused them of morbid sensationalism. Nevertheless, it became an instant icon for war photography, and it is one of the most famous images ever taken in warfare.

Mainline German Tank Identification Guide Part III G: Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf. M

Nearly identical to the previous Ausf. L, the M would add special fording equipment (note the large equipment on the muffler), as well as move the smoke dispensers to the turret sides, and lowering the smoke dispenser count per unit to 3 from the previous 5. Finally the new fording equipment required a slight increase in width.
#war #warfare #military #militaryhistory #historybuff #historynerd #20thcentury #20thcenturywarfare #worldwars #thesecondworldwar #worldwartwo #history #europeantheater #westernfront #easternfront #history #tanks #tank #panzer #panzeriii #panzeriiim #tankidentificationguide #germantanks #armor #armour

Day 7: This is a foodway journal. As a part of the Food History class that I'm taking this year, we are supposed to research the "journey" of three different dishes or individual elements that we ate during the previous week. I have really loved getting to find out more about how the food I eat has some how ended up in not only Toronto but my everyday life. This week's feature: tomato sauce. This isn't something your nonna knows. Happiness provided by: inspirations pulled from the past.
#100happydays #day7 #history #historynerd #historybuff #foodlover #notyournonnassauce

It's been almost 7 years since I first read about the Eichmann trial in some edition of Reader's Digest. After watching the flick "The Eichmann Show" yesterday, I realized that I'm still confounded by the widely publicized trial and the man himself. To be fiercely honest, I find it hard to judge him for his lack of contrition in the light of his defense that he was simply bound by the oath of loyalty and being just another dutiful SS official. ( A defense that was widely heard during the Nuremberg trials too)
But the startling fact is that no one has really been able to decrypt his personality or explain his trial room nonchalance in a convincing manner. Was he the personification of the " Banality of Evil" who never understood the enormity of his monstrosity as Hannah Arendt ( thanks Prof. Visdomini for introducing her in class) believed or was he that rabid anti-semite who spewed hatred for the Jews and derived a sense of gratification while helping annihilate millions?
Obscurity still reigns!

#eichmann #eichmanninjerusalem #eichmannshow #eichmanntrial #hannaharendt #holocaust #history #historynerd #historygeek #historygeeks #historymakers #historymade #historynerds #banalityofevil #holocaustmemorial #nazis #historylover #loveforhistory #historybuff #historybuffs #hannaharendtstrasse #historyloversofinstagram #historyinpictures #historyininstagram #historyandinstagram #historicevent #historypicture#historypictures #picfromhistory #picturesfromhistory

A #wonderfulday to spend with your #husband at your favorite place in #NYC
#MET #Metropolitanmuseum #historybuff #historygram #museum

The trunk and underbelly of our beautiful ancient tree! We have called this a Sequoia tree, part of the Redwood Cedar family, for years. Some guests who study dendrology have identified it as a Port Orford Cedar, more commonly known as White Cedar. What do you think? It's at least 123 years old, can you guess at the age?
If you haven't been in to take in the awesome beauty of this ancient tree, come by and give it a hug!
#RamadaDuncan #explorecowichan #duncan #hotel #conferencecentre #cedar #redwood #sequoia #trees #arboristsofinstagram #dendrology #whatdoyouthink #ancienttree #ancientcedar #oldesttree #historybuff #natureisneat #photoopp

Visited Winston Churchill’s secret underground War Rooms which were operational throughout WWII. Fascinating! #imperialwarmuseum #winstonchurchill #historybuff

Anyone else watching @pbs The Vietnam War?? Totally fascinating and this snippet blew my mind - America's goals for the war: 70% Don't get humiliated. 😵🤤😱 10% help the South Vietnamese. ⁉️🙈🙉⁉️
.
I'm also blown away by how many opportunities early on there were to get out and everyone knew it was hopeless but just couldn't appear "weak on communism". So sad. 🙁 .
Still over 10 hours so go and it's only up to 1967!
.
@vietnamwarpbs .
#HistoryTeacher #Vietnam #VietnamWar #Historybuff

Sending a big proud #shoutout to my guy @joshua_do_ for earning a full academic scholarship to the @washington_university_ 🙌🏾👏🏾💪🏾Also happens to be the kids favorite school..which is awesome!!Josh is performing single arm unilateral rotational mace swings into contralateral knee lift with emphasis on thoracic rotation,eccentric/acceleration training for rotator cuffs/delts/lats/pecs,connecting adductor-abdominal fascia(anterior oblique sling) as well as connecting lats/contralateral glutes through thoracolumbar fascia(posterior oblique sling) allowing him to have better #core /gait tensegrity.Great work ,and outstanding job getting your #college paid for boss!! #sports #performance #training #scholastic #honors #historybuff #studentathlete #lacrosse #lacrosselife #oregon #highschool #athletics #lacrosseplayers #lacrosselife #thankyougrandparents

A clip from the iconic opening scene of the 1998 film \"Saving Private Ryan\". The film's battle scenes (especially the depiction of the beach landing) were so realistic to WWII veterans that the U.S Department of Veteran Affairs set up a nationwide hotline for those traumatized. This realism is attributed to the 30 amputees recruited to realistically portray the wounded dismembered soldiers.

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