#everydayclimatechange

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Photo by @edkashi As a rainbow colored sunset ends another day in the Old Port, the people of Marseille, France go about their business on Sept. 14, 2010. NASA states that industrial activities that the modern civilization depends on have raised atmospheric carbon dioxide levels from 280 parts per million to 379 parts per million in the last 150 years. These increased concentrations have caused the greenhouse effect to occur where heat that was radiated from earth toward space becomes trapped, and subsequently @everydayclimatechange ensues. #ECC #everydayclimatechange #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #actonclimate #NASA #rainbow #marseille #france #atmosphere #carbondioxide #CO2 #greenhouseeffect #globalwarming #transit

Photo by Monirul Alam @meghmonir for @everydayclimatechange ~ It's nature ever-changing by climate weather with wilderness ruled by tides and tigers. The Sundarbans, shared by Bangladesh and India in the Gangetic delta. It is home to an estimated 425 species of wildlife, including 300 species of birds and 42 species of mammals, including the Bengal Tiger. UNESCO declared Sundarban's a world heritage in 1987.
Bangladesh ranks first as the nation most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Scientists expect rising sea levels to submerge 17 percent of Bangladesh's land and displace 18 million people in the next 40 years. Bangladesh ranks fist as the nation most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Seientists expect rising sea levels to submerge 17 percent of Bangladesh’s land and displace 18 million people in the next 40 years. People become homeless and suffering shortage of food, drinking water and medicines especially children and woman suffer much more. Rising sea levels and the growing number of natural disasters forced by climate change are already driving migration and displacement. Climate Change is my long-term project where I began to document of marginal condition in my own country of Bangladesh. © Monirul Alam

#witnessphoto #monirulalam #sundarban #Bangladesh #UNESCO #reportage #editorial#magazine#storytelling#sundarban#mangroves#forest#tides#tigers#YourShotPhotographer#ReportageSpotlight#travel#photojournalism#everydayclimatechange#globalwarming

Women pounding rice in Antaravato, Madagascar. This image was taken during a fellowship program created by Dr. Christopher Golden. To read more about his work, the fellowship and MAHERY please visit https://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2017/08/16/ideas-are-like-eggs-once-hatched-they-have-wings/

Sponsored by FUJIFILM North America Corporation and @MAHERY_madagascar

In the late 1990s, Lake Urmia, in north-western Iran, was twice as large as Luxembourg and the largest salt-water lake in the Middle East. Since then it has shrunk substantially, and was sliced in half in 2008, with consequences uncertain to this day, by a 15-km causeway designed to shorten the travel time between the cities of Urmia and Tabriz. Historically, the lake attracted migratory birds including flamingos, pelicans, ducks and egrets. Its drying up, or desiccation, is undermining the local food web, especially by destroying one of the world’s largest natural habitats of the brine shrimp Artemia, a hardy species that can tolerate salinity levels of 340 grams per litre, more than eight times saltier than ocean water. Effects on humans are perhaps even more complicated. The tourism sector has clearly lost out. While the lake once attracted visitors from near and far, some believing in its therapeutic properties, Urmia has turned into a vast salt-white barren land with beached boats serving as a striking image of what the future may hold.

Desiccation will increase the frequency of salt storms that sweep across the exposed lakebed, diminishing the productivity of surrounding agricultural lands and encouraging farmers to move away. Poor air, land, and water quality all have serious health effects including respiratory and eye diseases .

The results of an investigation, which recently appeared in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, revealed that in September 2014 the lake’s surface area was about 12% of its average size in the 1970s, a far bigger fall than previously realised. The research undermines any notion of a crisis caused primarily by climate changes. It shows that the pattern of droughts in the region has not changed significantly, and that Lake Urmia survived more severe droughts in the past.
#UrmiaLake #EastAzarbaijanProvince #Iran
Photo by : Paolo Patrizi @paolopatrizi
#EverydayEverywhere #EverydayAZB #EverydayClimateChange

В Гренландии 8 день горит тундра. В Гренландии!!!Выгоревшая площадь уже более 1200 га. Причина - глобальное изменение климата. Солнечные батареи, авто Тесла, раздельный сбор мусора и его переработка, вегетарианство - все это уже стало реальностью миллионов осознанных людей... А вы верите, что нам всем пора меняться или у вас запасная планета? 🌎 #everydayclimatechange

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Women pounding rice in Antaravato, Madagascar. This image was taken during a fellowship program created by Dr. Christopher Golden. To read more about his work, the fellowship and MAHERY please visit https://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2017/08/16/ideas-are-like-eggs-once-hatched-they-have-wings/

Sponsored by FUJIFILM North America Corporation and @MAHERY_madagascar

Enchente na cidade de Anama, Amazonas. Nos últimos 10 anos os ribeirinhos viram os maiores níveis históricos do rio Solimões. As casas são frequentemente reformadas para ficarem mais elevadas.
#amazonia #climatechange #flood #amazon #ribeirinhos #everydayclimatechange #brazil #natgeoyourshot #everydayeverywhere

Photo by Monirul Alam @meghmonir for @everydayclimatechange ~ It's nature ever-changing by climate weather with wilderness ruled by tides and tigers. The Sundarbans, shared by Bangladesh and India in the Gangetic delta. It is home to an estimated 425 species of wildlife, including 300 species of birds and 42 species of mammals, including the Bengal Tiger. UNESCO declared Sundarban's a world heritage in 1987.
Bangladesh ranks first as the nation most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Scientists expect rising sea levels to submerge 17 percent of Bangladesh's land and displace 18 million people in the next 40 years. Bangladesh ranks fist as the nation most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Seientists expect rising sea levels to submerge 17 percent of Bangladesh’s land and displace 18 million people in the next 40 years. People become homeless and suffering shortage of food, drinking water and medicines especially children and woman suffer much more. Rising sea levels and the growing number of natural disasters forced by climate change are already driving migration and displacement. Climate Change is my long-term project where I began to document of marginal condition in my own country of Bangladesh. © Monirul Alam

#witnessphoto #monirulalam #sundarban #Bangladesh #UNESCO #reportage #editorial#magazine#storytelling#sundarban#mangroves#forest#tides#tigers#YourShotPhotographer#ReportageSpotlight#travel#photojournalism#everydayclimatechange#globalwarming

In the late 1990s, Lake Urmia, in north-western Iran, was twice as large as Luxembourg and the largest salt-water lake in the Middle East. Since then it has shrunk substantially, and was sliced in half in 2008, with consequences uncertain to this day, by a 15-km causeway designed to shorten the travel time between the cities of Urmia and Tabriz. Historically, the lake attracted migratory birds including flamingos, pelicans, ducks and egrets. Its drying up, or desiccation, is undermining the local food web, especially by destroying one of the world’s largest natural habitats of the brine shrimp Artemia, a hardy species that can tolerate salinity levels of 340 grams per litre, more than eight times saltier than ocean water. Effects on humans are perhaps even more complicated. The tourism sector has clearly lost out. While the lake once attracted visitors from near and far, some believing in its therapeutic properties, Urmia has turned into a vast salt-white barren land with beached boats serving as a striking image of what the future may hold.

Desiccation will increase the frequency of salt storms that sweep across the exposed lakebed, diminishing the productivity of surrounding agricultural lands and encouraging farmers to move away. Poor air, land, and water quality all have serious health effects including respiratory and eye diseases .

The results of an investigation, which recently appeared in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, revealed that in September 2014 the lake’s surface area was about 12% of its average size in the 1970s, a far bigger fall than previously realised. The research undermines any notion of a crisis caused primarily by climate changes. It shows that the pattern of droughts in the region has not changed significantly, and that Lake Urmia survived more severe droughts in the past.
#UrmiaLake #EastAzarbaijanProvince #Iran
Photo by : Paolo Patrizi @paolopatrizi
#EverydayEverywhere #EverydayAZB #EverydayClimateChange

Maasmechelen, Belgium, april 2007, each year in South and western Europe records gets beaten in rainfall deficit with dry rivers and wildfires as result. May 2017 use of water was limited during periods of drought #everydayclimatechange #wwweek

Farmers harvest chilli on their farm in the North-western Ethiopian province of Amhara. A rise in bouts of heavy rainfall due to climate change have increased soil erosion and degradation in this hilly region of the country which are damaging many of the farms situated here. This couple are beneficiaries of a project run by Ethiopia-Wetlands seeking to promote conservation farming as a means of reducing erosion and preserving the quality and fertility of the land here.

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