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Going to see “A House with a Clock in it’s Walls” tomorrow! The review for it will be out tomorrow night! It looks like an interesting movie! Anyone else interested in this movie??? #ahousewithaclockinitswalls #movie #movies #moviereview #earlymovie #housewithaclock
@jackblack

I hadn't heard of #nadiasibirskaia up until 3 or 4 days ago when I happened upon this image shared by someone I follow over on #twitter.
What a beautiful image. This is a still from the film #blighty [#1927]
I don't know a lot about her, apart from the fact she was born in #redon in #france in #1900 & was married to early filmmaker #dimitrikirsanoff.
Do you know much about her?
Seen any of her films?
#films #movies #precode #earlyfilm #earlyfilms
#earlymovie #earlymovies #filmstill #moviestill #blackandwhitephotography #blackandwhitecinematography #blackandwhite #beautifulimage

The Life and Passion of Jesus Christ (Ferdinand Zecca and Lucien Nonguet, 1903)
Whilst this most certainly wasn’t the first feature length film ever made (That goes Australia’s lost Story of the Kelly Gang released in 1906) this 45 minute depiction of the life of Jesus Christ certainly helped lay the groundwork for it. And what’s even more impressive is how it manages to maintain a relatively high quality all throughout a lengthy amount of time that was kind of unheard of in 1903. Sure directors Zecca and Nonguet crib a lot from Melies style and his own attempts at longer narrative projects (In particular his masterful depiction of the life of Joan of Arc, which lasted for a quarter of the time), but as far as rip-off’s go, it’s still a very finely assembled one that has many moments of inspired visual artistry (My particular favourite being Jesus walking on water and his feeding of the 5000). It’s not a particularly deep retelling of the life of Jesus, it’s very much a Christ’s Greatest Hits compilation, but even an atheist such as myself can appreciate how well-crafted this is a piece of early cinema. Recommended. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #ferdinandzecca #luciennonguet #1903 #christianity #religious #drama #jesuschrist #shortfilm #silentfilm

Mary Jane’s Mishap (George Albert Smith, 1903)
Well perhaps the reason why this short film is so significant is right in this particular frame. No it’s not the Helena Bonham Carter looking lady you see, but it’s a rather snazzy little trick you may have heard of called the Close-Up. And I don’t mean a POV shot which was utilised before this, I mean an actual dramatic zoom-in that is done to make the action clearer. Pretty neat right? Anyhow, this is a pretty entertaining little comedic short that’s somewhat of a remake of a Porter film the previous year, about a ditsy maid who ends up accidentally blowing her kitchen up. Its pretty playful with its story, but if it wasn’t for its innovative camerawork for the time, this would probably be forgotten by film scholars somewhat. Check it out though. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmposter #filmtime #maryjanesmishap #georgealbertsmith #1903 #comedy #slapstick #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Electrocuting an Elephant (Edwin S. Porter and Jacob Blair Smith, 1903)
Sadly not every famous film of the early years of cinema offered entertainment or perspective. For every Classic, there are always those most infamous of titles, films that draw out nothing but contempt and hatred from an audience who see it in the full knowledge that what they are witnessing has been made with the most sickening intention. Thomas Edison’s role in the history of motion pictures is incredibly important, no one can deny that, but actions such as attempting to form a monopoly over film production in America to squeeze out his competition, as well as bootlegging films made by Georges Melies in an effort to bankrupt him, have rightfully seen him dubbed as a Capitalist bogeyman who put selfish greed over artistic development. But this is perhaps one of his most infamous sins, a brief minute long clip of an old circus elephant, Topsy, being executed after her owners deemed her as “troublesome.” Now the popular story behind this film’s existence is that it was a salvo in the War of the Currents, a means of demonstrating that AC power was dangerous, as Edison advocated for the use of his own DC power. But this was shot and filmed at least a decade after that occurred, meaning there wasn’t even a point to this vicious display of animal cruelty, aside from trying to earn some money by appealing to the very lowest denominator. And that’s really just the essence of Edison in a nutshell, despite the important things he may have done for Film, he never saw it as a means of creating art, but a hollow endeavour designed to snatch as much cash from the buying public as he possibly could. And what’s even worse is the fact that that mentality has continued, with studios trying to exploit its paying customers by making content that’s designed to fill as many seats as possible. In a way, all bad filmmaking owes itself to this. Ugh. film #cinema #movie #badfilm #badmovie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmphotography #filmtime #electrocutinganelephant #edwinsporter #1903 #silentfilm #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

A Daring Daylight Burglary (Frank S. Mottershaw, 1903)
Whilst not exactly the first stone placed in the creation of the crime genre of cinema, Mottershaw’s Daring Daylight Burglary certainly help set a lot of genre standards such as bleakness and realism, as well as act as one of the first instances of a “chase film”. Evidently it’s depiction of a group of policemen chasing down a tenacious criminal was also part of the explosion wave of filmmakers hopping onto Porter’s influential approach to narrative continuity, and Mottershaw has an impressive talent for letting scenes flow from one to the other in a way that doesn’t allow for the sense of suspense to dissipate. Recommended viewing. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #adaringdaylightburglary #franksmottershaw #1903 #action #crime #suspense #chase #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

The following posts are dedicated to tracking the life and many tragedies of the German actress Sybille Schmitz. Part one: the tragedies of Sybille Schmitz .
Sybille Schmitz was born in 1909 in Duden, Germany to a middle class german family. When she was fourteen, her father sent her off to a business school in Cologne, but Sybille had dreams of appearing on stage, or perhaps the silver screen. She took a job in order to pay for acting classes and actress Louise Dumont allowed her to enter the acting school in Cologne in the middle of a semester. But it didn’t take long before Sybille wanted to experience the real world of an actress, so she took of to Berlin in 1927 to enroll in the Deutsches Theater. Only one year later, she made her film debut with Freie Fahrt (1928), which attracted her first attention from the critics. Her other early movies include Pabst's Diary of a Lost Girl (1929), Dreyer's Vampyr (1932), and eventually F.P.1 (1932), where she played her first leading role. During the mid thirties she was one of the leading actresses in Germany. She lived for a few years with director Frank Wysbar. He was an alcoholic and Sybille began drinking heavily in his company
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#actress #german #germanactress #history #historyphotographed #historyinpictures #sybilleschmitz #actor #actress #thingsyoudidntknow #unknown #forgottenstories #forgottenhistory #movie #silverscreen #moviestar #movie #movietime #vintagemovies #1930 #1930s #thethirties #vintage #fashionhistory #moviehistory #filmhistory #actresslife #earlyfilm #earlymovie #moviestarplanet

모처럼 혼자 영화보러 왔어요.
'어드리프트'
이 큰 영화관에 겨우 5명만 입장했어요^^
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I came to watch movies alone.
'ADrift'
Only 5 people entered this big movie theater ^^
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#movie #cinema #earlymovie #adrift #adriftmovie #sea #realization #impression #megabox #paju #unjeong #love
#영화 #영화관람 #조조영화 #어드리프트 #바다 #실화 #감동 #메가박스 #파주 #운정 #사랑해💕

The Little Match Seller (James Williamson, 1902)
Perhaps cinema’s first ever tearjerker, this is a sad and tender adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s short story, about a destitute match seller who receives visions of a better life, whilst struggling to survive on a cold New Year’s Eve. Williamson sheds some of the work he’s done in utilising narrative continuity in his previous films to place a greater emphasis on atmosphere and mood, utilising special effects to place us in the mind of our tragic heroine as she dreams of a warm place to sleep. It’s really quite impressive how Williamson has managed to strip down a lot of his style to make something so small-scale and yet exists as an inherently cinematic piece of art. Recommended. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #thelittlematchgirl #jameswilliamson #1902 #tragedy #drama #literature #adaptation #hanschristianandersen #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Loading the Ice on Cars, Conveying it Across the Mountains and Loading the Boats (1902)
Technically part of a series of three films, but important in how it marks the transition from the simple actuality to modern documentary filmmaking. The series depicts the process of carving and storing of ice, which was the method used for storing food before the invention of refrigeration changed the world (Causing a battle between the new invention and the decades old industry which supported dozens of jobs). Anyhow, these shorts all come together to tell a “story” of sorts, namely how the ice gets from one location to the other, and really the actuality hadn’t told this kind of “narrative” before, instead being content to just show a brief real-life scene that didn’t need context for explanation. But in order to get the full intended experience, one must watch each of these shorts in order to understand how they fit into the next. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmblog #filmhistory #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmphotography #filmreview #filmtime #1902 #documentary #historical #icepacking #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Bird’s-Eye View of San Francisco, Cal., from a Balloon (1902)
Whilst this wasn’t the first ever film that utilised aerial footage (There was an earlier Lumiere short that saw a camera strapped onto a rising balloon), perhaps this is the first modern instance of the technique that is recognisable to our modern sensibilities. It’s really quite impressive for the time, having a God’s eye view of the San Francisco area in 1902, to historians has great value in terms of it depicting the architectural layout of the city. And on top of that, it’s just impressive in general that they were able to record this in what must have been a very cramped hot air balloon. Interesting stuff. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #1902 #aerialfootage #actuality #sanfrancisco #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Uncle Josh at the Moving Picture Show (Edwin S. Porter, 1902)
A really rather strange little comedic short, perhaps one of the very first “meta” films in cinematic history. The titular Uncle Joe goes to a local cinema where he sees a series of shorts depicting popular scenes (Trains, dances, etc.) where he then gets himself into trouble when the realism of the films causes him to fly into a rage, due to him thinking his wife is having an affair in one of the films. The whole thing has a weird kind of comedic voyeurism to it, like if Alfred Hitchcock was crossed with Gogglebox if that makes sense. Anyway, it’s an interesting little piece of humour that pokes fun at how audiences interact with the medium of cinema in its early days. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmposter #filmtime #edwinsporter #1902 #comedy #slapstick #meta #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Alfred Raymond, Agnes May, and Wilfred Sydney (Edward Raymond Turner, 1902)
Well this was certainly a shocker. Whilst the use of colour tinting in cinema (which saw frames individually painted over) had been around since at least 1900, this is widely regarded as being the first proper colour film of its kind, at least thirty years before Hollywood’s invention of technicolour. This brief series of vignettes comes to us via inventor Edward Raymond Turner, who invented a camera that utilised a rotating disk of three colour filters, which would imprint themselves in successive frames. The idea was to create the effect via the usage of additive colour, which involves mixing light colours with shades of the three primary colours, which pretty much how televisions and computer monitors operate. Unfortunately however, in 1902 this process was in a very primitive stage of operation, and the footage that was produced was too jittery and blurry for anyone to consider investing in it. Turner himself would die of a sudden heart attack a year later, but his work was undoubtedly hugely important, and his footage has an eerie psychedelic and abstract quality to it. Check it out. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #edwardraymondturner #1902 #actuality #experimental #colourfilm #shortfilm #silentfilm

Jack and the Beanstalk (Edwin S. Porter and George S. Fleming, 1902)
Whilst cinematic pioneer Edwin S. Porter spent a significant portion of his early career poorly imitating other great directors such as Melies and Williamson in a rather naked fashion, this little 8 minute cinematic adaptation of Jack and the Beanstalk marks his first step toward’s utilising narrative continuity in a way which would place him at the forefront of American and world cinema. Whilst it’s fantastical nature and use of editing do take inspiration from the aforementioned filmmakers, Porter feels more like his own Director rather than just a cheap facsimile, managing to put a more “realistic” spin on a popular folktale. There’s less of a reliance on special effects, (in fact Porter uses them when the story absolutely requires, unlike Melies who would insert them with an almost gleefully wanton sense of abandon), and he utilises continuity in the way that each scene flows smoothly into the next, which for 1902 was really quite daring. By having a larger budget, Porter’s approach to said continuity feels a lot more natural and smooth, unlike Williamson’s who in comparison feels somewhat janky. Anyway all that being in said, this is a pretty important little watch. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #jackandthebeanstalk #edwinsporter #georgefleming #1902 #adventure #fantasy #fairytale #folktale #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Before the Nickelodeon: The Early Cinema of Edwin. S Porter (Charles Musser, 1982)
One of the things I always worry about when doing my posts on important pieces of early cinema, is that I lack the ability to articulate how and why certain films are so influential in filmmaking history. When certain movies seems so primitive through the lens of our modern cinematic eye, how can we tell today’s audiences that works in the 1900’s were so pivotal to our understanding of cinematic form? Well this great little documentary on the life and career of cinematic pioneer Edwin S. Porter manages to do that job very very well. Directed by film historian Charles Musser and narrated by silent era actress Blanche Street (Who acted in numerous films directed by that other American cinematic trailblazer, D.W. Griffith), it utilises photographs, letters, media reviews, and the films of Porter himself to chart his career and massive influence on both American and world cinema. I should say that those with an academic interest in film history like myself will get the most out of this, so don’t go into this casually expecting a laid-back documentary. But for those who are interested in the subject, this is an essential watch. Recommended. #film #cinema #movie #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmposter #filmtime #beforethenickelodeon #charlesmusser #1982 #blanchesweet #documentary #historical #filmhistory #earlyfilm #earlymovie #academic

Pan-American Exposition by Night (Edwin S. Porter and James Blair Smith, 1901)
The Pan-American Exposition of 1901 is somewhat of an infamous event in American history. What was intended to be celebrated to be a celebration of cultures all across North and South America in Buffalo, New York turned into a day of mourning as US President William McKinley was killed by anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Temple of Music. But that shouldn’t overshadow some of the exceptional footage that was shot there, including this short from Great Train Robbery director Edwin S. Porter, which depicts the convention during both the morning and evening. Not only is it the earliest instance of night time photography I’ve seen in cinematic history, but Porter manages to make a beautiful dissolve depicting the edit between the humdrum afternoon, to the neon-soaked night of the convention almost seamlessly. Check it out. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #panamericanexposition #edwinsporter #1901 #actuality #historical #shortfilm #silentfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

Demolishing and Building up the Star Theatre (Frederick S. Armitage, 1901)
Time-lapses in both film and photography have always astounded me. Just watching something expand, shrink, rise, and fall over a period of time always just gives me a visceral and borderline existential jolt. But seeing it in the year 1901, when something as simple as reversing film stock was seen as a gigantic leap forward for the medium, watching the demolition and rebuilding of New York’s Star Theatre must have been nothing short of mind-altering. I thought that such a technical landmark wouldn’t be possible for at least two decades after this, but somehow, and with exceptional dedication and tenacity, Armitage crafted a powerful depiction of flowing time, and how we are all insignificant in its unending journey forward. Recommended. #film #cinema #movie #earlyfilm #earlymovie #filmhistory #filmblog #filmcollection #filmoftheday #filmmaking #filmreview #filmphotography #filmtime #fredericksarmitage #1901 #actuality #documentary #timelapse #silentfilm #shortfilm #blackandwhite #blackandwhitefilm

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