#bkmasianart

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This sculpture depicts the Jina Mahavira, the founder of the Jain religion and a historical contemporary of the Buddha. Here, Mahavira is shown as a Digambara, or “person clothed by air.” The Digambara sect of Jainism practices nudity as a form of asceticism. His nudity reflects his commitment to the most extreme and highest level of Jain practice. Additionally, the Jina is depicted engaged in standing meditation. Ultimately, this work is centered on the idea of denying the power of the body and, despite its use of nudity, has no sexual connotations. It is actually an act of religious devotion. Find the Jina Mahavira in #iggypoplifeclass, selected for display by artist #JeremyDeller.

A little #bluesday inspiration from #bkmasianart: This #thangka, or painting on cloth, shows the multi-headed, multi-limbed, buffalo-horned god Vajrabhairava stomping on his enemies. Barely visible against him is his similarly fierce (and blue) female partner, Vajravetali. Can you spot her? Vajrabhairava is one of Buddhism’s most intimidating deities. His worship is only for advanced practitioners. His alternate name, Yamantaka (Conqueror of Death), celebrates his role in combatting both the fear of mortality and mortality itself. #infinitebluebkm 🔵

A little #bluesday inspiration from #bkmasianart: The top half of this fanciful plate depicts Fujin, the Japanese god of wind. He slings his heavy bag of wind over his muscled shoulders on a background of swirling air. The depiction of Fujin represents the pictorial, almost painterly, use of the cloisonné medium that was favored in nineteenth-century Japan. However, the lower section of the plate makes direct reference to the Chinese cloisonné tradition, with repeated patterns of birds and leaves against the popular turquoise ground. This plate is a rare example of the documented use of such Japanese imports in an American interior. #infinitebluebkm

The Hindu gods Brahma and Vishnu are depicted here flanking the god Shiva, who appears in the form of lingam, his phallic emblem. The placement of the Shiva lingam in the center emphasizes the god's importance. Shiva is a quintessentially masculine deity, symbolizing physical power, energy, and self-discipline. Despite Shiva's defining role as Destroyer, however, he is also a physically powerful progenitor; the phallic symbol represents his ability to "inseminate" and provide the seeds for new creation. It is believed that the lingam offers a more evocative emblem of Shiva's power than a figural representation of him could because human qualities would limit the viewer's understanding of the god's abstract yet generative potency. Find these gods on view in #iggypoplifeclass, selected by artist #JeremyDeller.

A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: While this tripod plate was made in China, its design and motif has Middle Eastern and Central Asian roots. Its shape emulates silver trays imported into China from the Sasanian empire (224–651) in present-day Iran or from trading outposts in Sogdiana in present-day Uzbekistan. Both of these regions were linked by international trade on the Silk Routes to the Chinese capital at Chang’an (modern-day Xi’an). The vibrant tri-color palette of green, amber, and white glazes (sancai) was enhanced by the rare addition of blue, dating this plate to the prosperous High Tang period in the eighth century. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀

Depicting an image of the Buddha emaciated after a long period of fasting, this work is meant to demonstrate major principles of the Buddhist religion. Biographies of the Buddha describe the early phases of his religious quest, trying multiple paths in an attempt to reach enlightenment. On one of these paths, fasting, the Buddha found that his entire experience was spent thinking about his body’s needs, ultimately posing so much of a distraction that he was unable to engage in true spiritual thought. This discovery that extreme self-denial is not the path to enlightenment became a central tenet of Buddhism. Instead the Buddha began to encourage others to follow a middle path as a means of achieving the greatest religious experience. This image of the ascetic Sakyamuni is a cautionary reminder of those ideals. See it on view in #iggypoplifclass, selected by artist #JeremyDeller.

A little #bluesday inspiration from #bkmasianart: This masterpiece of Chinese porcelain is an important example of early blue-and-white ware from the imperially sponsored kilns of Jingdezhen. Four energetic fish are depicted swimming along the hips of the vessel; their Chinese names form a rebus for the phrase qingbai lianjie, meaning “honest and incorruptible.” The twisting leaves and stems of the eelgrass, blossoming lotuses, and other flora elegantly frame the fish and re-create the teeming pulse of a lush aquarium. The visual wordplay suggests that the jar may have been made for an elite clientele who, it was hoped, would be inspired by the rebus’s message of rectitude while drinking their wine. #infinitebluebkm 🔵

Although the seated versus standing poses are not as codified as the hand mudras (specific hand gestures with various meanings such as goodwill, meditation, protection, etc.), the poses of the body are also sometimes considered mudras which can imply that that particular Buddha is meditating or guarding/protecting. A seated Buddha is understood as a meditative pose while standing figures are seen as more interactive. This Buddha may represent the The bhūmisparśa, or “earth witness” mudra, and it depicts the Buddha sitting in meditation with his left hand, palm upright, in his lap, and his right hand touching the earth. Have a question on your next visit at the Museum? Download our #askbkm app and ask away.⠀

A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Not only is this print among the most famous of the great printmaker #KatsushikaHokusai’s works, but it is also one of the earliest versions of this image. View of Mt. Fuji from a Boat at Ushibori from "Thirty-Six Views of Fuji," is an example of an all-blue or mostly blue woodblock color print called aizuri-e or "blue picture." In later impressions, the central band of reeds behind the boat is lost. Also notable is the tilted perspective of the boat, which allows us see the vessel’s interior. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀

MOST RECENT

Ohara Donshu, "Blind Men Appraising an Elephant," early 19th century. #Ink and colors on paper. 🐘

#thehumancondition

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#OharaDonshu #japaneseart #19thcenturyart #elephant #whiteelephant #tusks #metaphorical #itsallaboutperspective #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

#Faces in the #crowd. 😐 🙄 🙁 😖 ____________________________________________

Kawanabe Kyosai, "Kyosai Kadan Nihen (Pictorial Accounts of Kyosai), Part II, Volume 3," 1887. Ink and light colors on paper.
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#KawanabeKyosai #japaneseart #japaneseprint #expression #book #illustration #meijiperiod #19thcenturyjapan #stylebook #types #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

Eisen Keisai, "Beauty Holding a Goldfish Bowl," detail, ca. 1830. #Woodblock print. 🐟 🐟 ____________________________________

#EisenKeisai #japaneseart #japaneseprint #19thcenturyJapan #fish #goldfish #fishbowl #koi #kimono #hairsticks #beauty #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

The soon-to-be-reopened #KoreanArt gallery at the @brooklynmuseum is conveniently located on the way to my office, so I get to see this beautifully painted #fish every time I swim by. 🐠

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Fragment of a Bottle, last half of 15th century, #Joseon Dynasty. #Buncheong ware, #stoneware with underglaze white slip and iron painting.

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#15thcenturyKorea #joseondynasty #winebottle #vessel #ceramic #fragment #koreandecorativeart #calligraphic #finelines #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Not only is this print among the most famous of the great printmaker #KatsushikaHokusai’s works, but it is also one of the earliest versions of this image. View of Mt. Fuji from a Boat at Ushibori from "Thirty-Six Views of Fuji," is an example of an all-blue or mostly blue woodblock color print called aizuri-e or "blue picture." In later impressions, the central band of reeds behind the boat is lost. Also notable is the tilted perspective of the boat, which allows us see the vessel’s interior. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀

Isoda Koryusai, page from the series "Models for Fashion: New Design as Fresh as Young Leaves," ca. 1775. #Woodblock print. 👘

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#IsodaKoryusai #japaneseart #japaneseprint #edo #edoperiod #ukiyoe #hairstyling #toilette #comb #haircomb #hairsticks #hairpins #makeup #cosmetics #kimono #fashionable #elegant #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

Slaying #Monday with all the #weapons. 🔷

__________________________________________________ "Durga Killing the Buffalo Demon," detail, India, 19th century. Opaque #watercolor embellished with applied #gold and lacquer strips.
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#india #goddess #durga #bluemonday #buffalodemon #blueskin #indianart #magnificent #fierce #mulitarm #hinduism #devoured #artdetail #jewelry #jewelryinart #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

I love the #bunny detail. 🐰

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Gosotei Toyokuni II, "Bust Portrait of a Courtesan," late 1820s. #Woodblock print.
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#GosoteiToyokuni #japaneseart #japaneseprint #japanesewoodblock #edo #edoperiod #ukiyoe #portrait #floatingworld #courtesan #beautiful #19thcenturyart #kimono #hairpins #rabbits #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

This sculpture depicts the Jina Mahavira, the founder of the Jain religion and a historical contemporary of the Buddha. Here, Mahavira is shown as a Digambara, or “person clothed by air.” The Digambara sect of Jainism practices nudity as a form of asceticism. His nudity reflects his commitment to the most extreme and highest level of Jain practice. Additionally, the Jina is depicted engaged in standing meditation. Ultimately, this work is centered on the idea of denying the power of the body and, despite its use of nudity, has no sexual connotations. It is actually an act of religious devotion. Find the Jina Mahavira in #iggypoplifeclass, selected for display by artist #JeremyDeller.

Now on view in #InfiniteBlue: this extraordinary pair of #Tibetan ear #pendants (ca. 17th-18th century). They were not worn in the ear itself but rather would have hung from a woman's headdress, near her ears, as an indication of her wealth and status. The most highly prized, sky-blue #turquoise originated from mines near Nishapur in Khorosan, Iran, and was traded to Tibet via India; darker colored turquoise came from both Tibet and China. 🔹🔵 ____________________________________
#infinitebluebkm #somethingblue #jewelry #mineral #turquoisejewelry #earrings #Tibet #earpendants #silver #17thcenturyjewelry #tibetanjewelry #statementjewelry #18thcenturyjewelry #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

Via @brooklynmuseum: 📍Kyoto, Japan: After a quick transit through Tokyo, we headed south to #Kyoto, the former Japanese capital. There we visited the great artist #ItōJakuchū‘s 500 arhats at #Sekihōji, and #Gion, the historic entertainment district, and familiarized ourselves more with the intricate ways of #sadō, the Japanese tea ceremony. Follow #BKMAsianart researcher Amanda Imai’s journey at @curatorialchronicles and bit.ly/bkminasia #buddha #buddhas #boddhisatvas #bodhisatvas #japan #kyoto #itojakuchu #sekhihoji #gion

#Repost @brooklynmuseum with @repostapp
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A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Necklaces like this one were made by the Ainu people, who inhabited parts of Hokkaido, Sakhalin, and the Kuril Islands before those areas were claimed by Japanese and Russian settlers. Ainu women wore these necklaces on formal occasions, and the necklaces were also displayed inside houses, alongside other treasured items. The origin of the glass beads may have contributed to the value of these items, as they were often imported from the southern islands of Japan or other foreign sources, traveling through extensive trade routes that linked the Ainu to distant communities in Manchuria and Sakhalin, among others. #infinitebluebkm 🔵

A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Necklaces like this one were made by the Ainu people, who inhabited parts of Hokkaido, Sakhalin, and the Kuril Islands before those areas were claimed by Japanese and Russian settlers. Ainu women wore these necklaces on formal occasions, and the necklaces were also displayed inside houses, alongside other treasured items. The origin of the glass beads may have contributed to the value of these items, as they were often imported from the southern islands of Japan or other foreign sources, traveling through extensive trade routes that linked the Ainu to distant communities in Manchuria and Sakhalin, among others. #infinitebluebkm 🔵

#PrettyInPink 🌸

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Utagawa Toyokuni I, "The Courtesan Ogino of Ogiya Tea House with Two Attendants," ca. 1790-1795. #Woodblock.

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#UtagawaToyokuni #japaneseart #japaneseprint #18thcentury #18thcenturyjapan #edo #edoperiod #ukiyoe #floatingworld #courtesan #kimono #pink #threegraces #trio #cherryblossoms #flowers #fashionable #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmasianart

Across cultures and time periods, mothers' abilities to continue loving us—even when we behave like brats—will always inspire us with awe. This #MothersDay, thank mom for her unwavering patience with a day filled with art and poetry here at the #brooklynmuseum. Tour our collections or smash exhibitions #okeeffemodern and #wewantedarevolution, then join #Brooklyn born @AjaMonet for an intimate afternoon of poetry dedicated to mothers, daughters, and sisters everywhere. We love you moms!

A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAsianart: Kalighat paintings, are watercolors produced quickly and in multiples for sale in the markets around the Kali temple in Kolkata at the turn of the 20th century. Common features of Kalighat paintings are the loose application of shading around the arms, legs, and faces of the figures and the rudimentary curtain at the top to suggest a stage or altar setting as seen here in this depiction of the blue deity Vishnu’s earthly avatar, Krishna and his partner Radha. Indian modernist artists of the early 20th century would cite Kalighat paintings as a source of inspiration, noting that their Indian predecessors were abstracting the human form even before European painters. #infinitebluebkm 🔵

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