#biology

MOST RECENT

I am so very proud of you. From the very beginning I knew you would achieve everything you put your mind too. This is only beginning. Congrats on receiving the Thomas A scholarship. # doing big things# Kean U #PAStudent #Biology#2020

Y la palabra se divide para re-escribirse a si misma
#microscopy
#biology

Snake face (3/3)⠀

The pygidial view of this Crotalocephalina sp. from the Devonian of Morocco demonstrates the characteristic thoracic spines that have protruded into pointed tips, as have the margins of the pygidia. These spines most likely aided the trilobite in spreading its weight as it moved over the soft sediment of the sea floor. As these trilobites are most often recovered from the sediments of carbonate mud mounds and sedimentary facies dominated by pelagic conditions this ‘snow shoe’ effect would have been particularly necessary.⠀
(Specimen size: ~70 mm)⠀

#geology #geologyrocks #rocks #rockstar #palaeontology #evolution #biology #macro #fossils #trilobite #trilobites #devonian #morocco #africa #limestone #sedimentary #naturalworld #ancient #ocean #sea #blackandwhite #rockaroundtheclock #rockandahardplace #getyourrocksoff #maddenthings #schoolofrock #sincethebeginning

Life’s Waiting To Begin.

#Kids extracting DNA from the feather of birds at #MaruyamaZoo in Hokkaido Japan.
They used the extracted DNA to determine the bird's gender!

#Science
#JapanPrize
#ScienceIsFun
#SchoolKids
#DNA
#Biology
#Laboratory

Thank you mami for always been there for me and pushing me. Thank you Diana for putting up with me and thanks you to my family for being there for me as well #csula #csulagrad #calstatela #biology #ididit #graciasmami #mariimyourbestandfavoriteairheadcousin💕

With the help of a #HokkaidoUniversity and the #MaruyamaZoo, an Easy-Understand Science and Technology Seminar for elementary school kids was hosted at Zoo. They kids learned to extract #DNA and use it to distinguish the animal's gender. Just look at those #curious faces!

#Science
#JapanPrize
#ScienceIsFun
#SchoolKids
#DNA
#Biology
#Laboratory

Dos pequeñas Telmatobius sp. rescatadas de una muerte atroz. El género Telmatobius es endémico de Sudamérica, pudiéndose encontrar en Ecuador, Perú, Bolivia, noroeste de Argentina y noreste de Chile.
Estas ranitas son utilizadas muchas veces en la elaboración de extractos de las que la tradición popular dice posee propiedades beneficiosas para la salud.

Es por eso que su número está decreciendo peligrosamente.

#rana #anfibios #telmatobius #peru #biologia #biology

Picking up vehicles for field work. We thought about picking the #Lamborghini but the gear wont fit... we ended getting the truck, which is actually much more powerful hahahahaha
#fieldwork #biology #wild49 #alberta #bioacusticunit

I've visited this spot many times over the years. Last year I noticed half a dozen cat's ears (Calochortus tolmiei). This year, post fire, there's hundreds.

Micro Cthulhu Zooplankton
Actinotroch larva of a phoronid - Arrowhead Worm 📷: Anita Slotwinski, Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, University of Tasmania #animals #nature #water #biology #organisms #environment

Quinta-feira foi assim 😊

#tbt #tbt❤️ #biologia #biology #ucb

Congratulations to Ben Connor for coming in 2nd place in the BABSOCs microjournalism competition with “The Small Things in (Soil) Life”! 🌱

Up to 5-21% of the carbon a plant fixes by photosynthesis is secreted into the soil by its roots. […] These secretions are called exudates, and can be composed of amino acids, organic acids, sugars, proteins, and other organic compounds. Exudates make the soil surrounding the roots (known as the rhizosphere) more beneficial for the plant in several ways: they can repel pathogens, modify the physical and chemical properties of the soil, and feed bacteria and fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the plant. Exudates can even be used as signaling compounds for plants and microbes to communicate.
[…]
In a healthy soil, all of a plant’s nutritional needs can be met with the help of these microbes. Why then, do we need to use fertilisers to grow our food?
[…]
A big factor is the decline of the microbial communities in our soils. Western agricultural practices like repetitive ploughing kills microbes by exposing them to the air and UV radiation from the sun, as well as decreasing soil carbon content, which is important for sustaining soil life. Bactericides and fungicides used against pathogens can also kill beneficial microbes. When inorganic fertilisers are used, populations of many beneficial microbes are further reduced, increasing the dependance on the fertilisers.

Without the strong community of microbes in the rhizosphere, it’s harder to balance the nutritional needs of a crop perfectly, so nutritional deficiencies and decreased resistance to pests and diseases are almost unavoidable. 👩🏼‍🌾
[...]
Thinking back to the exudates, if plants spend so much of their precious energy to improve the soil, it must be really important for them. If we want to help plants flourish, it might be better to work with them, not against them, to help improve the soil community they live in. Do we underestimate soil?

To read the full journal entry visit babsoc.com (link in the bio)

#science #unsw #biology #microbiology #cells #biotech #cellbiology #bacteria #biomolecularscience #sydney #australia #biotechnology #babsoc #unswscience

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