#apexpredatornotmonster

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@oceanicramsey with the gentle touch as Curly girl the tiger shark comes straight to her. The perception that sharks see people as a food source needs to be abolished. If sharks did actually hunt people as a food source, Interactions like this could not happen, I should have been shark bait 20 years ago, and sharks would actually kill more people than coconuts and selfies. On the extremely rare occasion we're sharks do bite people it is either mistaken identity or out of competition as an equal predator. Truth is humans are way more dangerous than sharks. Humans kill 70 to 100 million sharks each year and according to homicide reports world wide humans intentionally kill an average 500,000 other humans (not including fatalities occurring in fights of terrorism or war ) each year, while sharks mistakenly only kill an average of 10 people a year. #coexist #ApexPredatorNotMonster #helpsavesharks #changingperspective #stopsharkfinsoup #no #sharkfinsoup #curlygirl photo by #juanoliphant #juanito using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki @waterinspired @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaneducation @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaninspired @keiko_conservation @nakaweproject @oneoceanglobal @mission_blue @saveourseasfoundation

Cool 😎 photo of a sea turtle cleaning station by @blakethompsonphoto These Honu here are hovering over prominent coral heads where they will await their cleaning by fish 🐟🐠. Local fish species include the Hawaiian saddleback wrasse, convict tang and yellow tang (Zamzow,J. 1999). This behavior is a symbiotic relationship because the fish get food and the sea turtles are cleaned of unwanted algae, micro organisms, and in some cases harmful fibropapillomatosis!🤙🏽 Gotta love symbiotic relationships!Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster @alexisaraw

A little pre-check on the sharks and conditions before slipping into my favorite under water world 🦈. Thanks for the 📸 @oceanicramsey @oneoceandiving #savesharks #sharkscientist #apexpredatornotmonster #sharkconservation #itstheirocean

Within the Eastern Tropical Pacific, spinner dolphin groups can range across wide expanses. (Reilly, 1990). Hawaiian spinner dolphins travel in large pods, especially within pelagic areas. The movement of large groups of spinner dolphins may possibly promote greater foraging efficiency in the open ocean where prey presence is unpredictable. It may also provide greater protection from predators. (Gowans et al., 2008). In the Hawaiian Islands, the social structure of spinner dolphins differs between regions. (Andrews et al., 2010). Around the Big Island, spinner dolphins exhibit fission-fusion social structure. (Ostman, 1994). A fission-fusion society is one where animals can merge into the group, such as during rest, and split from the group, possibly into smaller groups, at other times, for example when hunting. Along Oahu, spinner dolphins are known to return to sites for long periods of time (Marten & Psarakos, 1999) and fission-fusion grouping. (Lammers, 2004). One of the biggest potential threats to Hawaiian spinner dolphins is the growing ecotourism industry and presence of shore swimmers along the islands. Because the species is active at night, daytime interactions can potentially inhibit necessary rest and sleep time (NOAA). Going out and seeing the dolphins is an amazing opportunity, but make sure if you choose to do so it’s with a responsible company that doesn’t force the interaction, alter or interfere with their natural lifestyle. With any ecotourism company, it is important that they don’t attract the animals with food, pose any dangers to the animals, and prevent guests from invading their personal space. At OneOceanDiving and @oneoceanresearch we use non-invasive research methods to minimize our impact as much as possible while providing an opportunity for guests to respectfully interact with the amazing marine life off Oahu in its natural environment. We also saw a pod of spinner dolphins on our way back to the harbor yesterday! 🐬🐬🐬 Post by: @sharksummers
Photo credit: @juansharks
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com>>

Flake. A popular seafood in #Australia and abroad. Ever heard of it? #Flake is #shark. My third day on the #SunshineCoast, I walked into a cafe selling this. I asked the cafe workers what kind of shark it was. "Either Gummy shark or #Blacktip Reef shark" they imparted. I then asked why they would sell it to customers since it's toxic for human consumption; shark meat is known to contain 42 x more mercury than is safe to eat (WildAid). The cafe employees shrieked; they didn't know. •

The manager then scurried in from the kitchen and chimed that they only kill the small sharks, which don't have that mercury buildup yet. "You kill baby sharks to sell the meat? You do know sharks are going extinct and catching the young prevents their populations from recovering?" Not to mention that sharks don't excrete their urine; they instead absorb urea back into their muscles (the meat that's sold), which is also toxic for human consumption. The manager looked nervous that I was causing such an uproar among the other customers and his employees, all clearly hearing this and audibly gasping. I just said its awful that they would contribute to sharks' #extinction and harm customers, and walked out with a disgusted look. I might not have made friends at that place.


So why not just call it shark? I think the flake market would collapse if most people knew what they were eating.

Where do you wear your #Thessalonike pieces? @oceanicramsey wears her rings while swimming amongst her finned friends in the Bahamas :)! #ThessalonikeGirls.
Photo by @juansharks.
#SaveOurSharks #OneOceanDiving #apexpredatornotmonster.

Today was beyond what I could have imagined- a dream come true. Many mahalos to everyone at @oneoceandiving and to the great work they do in shark research and conservation.🦈🦈 My experience in the water wiped out any negative perceptions and fear I may have held towards these graceful and curious creatures. Here it is: Humans and sharks in beautiful coexistence. #savethesharks #apexpredatornotmonster

I sure do love this crazy bunch of shark jedis 🦈. #apexpredatornotmonster #sharkconservation #savesharks @oneoceandiving photo by @juansharks

MOST RECENT

Thank you @juansharks for this post. You said it perfectly- selfies & coconuts do kill more people than SHARKS! I love this photo too! Repost from @juansharks @oceanicramsey with the gentle touch as Curly girl the tiger shark comes straight to her. The perception that sharks see people as a food source needs to be abolished. If sharks did actually hunt people as a food source, Interactions like this could not happen, I should have been shark bait 20 years ago, and sharks would actually kill more people than coconuts and selfies. On the extremely rare occasion we're sharks do bite people it is either mistaken identity or out of competition as an equal predator. Truth is humans are way more dangerous than sharks. Humans kill 70 to 100 million sharks each year and according to homicide reports world wide humans intentionally kill an average 500,000 other humans (not including fatalities occurring in fights of terrorism or war ) each year, while sharks mistakenly only kill an average of 10 people a year. #coexist #ApexPredatorNotMonster #helpsavesharks #changingperspective #stopsharkfinsoup #no #sharkfinsoup #curlygirl photo by #juanoliphant #juanito using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki @waterinspired @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaneducation @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaninspired @keiko_conservation @nakaweproject @oneoceanglobal @mission_blue @saveourseasfoundation

We got an amazing visit from this big girl on nearly every tour today! #CurlyGirl is a regular tiger shark @oneoceandiving and has been around since the start of the organization! Mahalo for this write up @juansharks!
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@oceanicramsey with the gentle touch as Curly girl the tiger shark comes straight to her. The perception that sharks see people as a food source needs to be abolished. If sharks did actually hunt people as a food source, Interactions like this could not happen, I should have been shark bait 20 years ago, and sharks would actually kill more people than coconuts and selfies. On the extremely rare occasion we're sharks do bite people it is either mistaken identity or out of competition as an equal predator. Truth is humans are way more dangerous than sharks. Humans kill 70 to 100 million sharks each year and according to homicide reports world wide humans intentionally kill an average 500,000 other humans (not including fatalities occurring in fights of terrorism or war ) each year, while sharks mistakenly only kill an average of 10 people a year. #coexist #ApexPredatorNotMonster #helpsavesharks #changingperspective #stopsharkfinsoup #no #sharkfinsoup #curlygirl photo by #juanoliphant #juanito using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki @waterinspired @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaneducation @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaninspired @keiko_conservation @nakaweproject @oneoceanglobal @mission_blue @saveourseasfoundation

I was stoked to see #MsAloha make an appearance last week out with @oneoceandiving! In this picture you can still see the scar left from the fishing line wrapped around her head so tightly it was cutting into her gills, which @juansharks was thankfully able to remove. Ever since then she has been a regular visitor to the aggregation site. One of my favorite aspects of the work we do at @oneoceanresearch with the photo ID program is helping others to see these animals as individuals rather than an amorphous group. It's difficult to conceptualize the fact that up to 100 million sharks are killed per year, but after interacting with sharks at their level, they lose their status of anonymity and are no longer seen as nameless masses. After experiencing these animals firsthand, it's impossible to remain indifferent to their protection. #savesharks #protectwhatyoulove

Sharks are everything 🦈 hopefully one day I'll be this close to them, doing my part

#Repost @juansharks (@get_repost)
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@oceanicramsey with the gentle touch as Curly girl the tiger shark comes straight to her. The perception that sharks see people as a food source needs to be abolished. If sharks did actually hunt people as a food source, Interactions like this could not happen, I should have been shark bait 20 years ago, and sharks would actually kill more people than coconuts and selfies. On the extremely rare occasion we're sharks do bite people it is either mistaken identity or out of competition as an equal predator. Truth is humans are way more dangerous than sharks. Humans kill 70 to 100 million sharks each year and according to homicide reports world wide humans intentionally kill an average 500,000 other humans (not including fatalities occurring in fights of terrorism or war ) each year, while sharks mistakenly only kill an average of 10 people a year. #coexist #ApexPredatorNotMonster #helpsavesharks #changingperspective #stopsharkfinsoup #no #sharkfinsoup #curlygirl photo by #juanoliphant #juanito using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki @waterinspired @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaneducation @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaninspired @keiko_conservation @nakaweproject @oneoceanglobal @mission_blue @saveourseasfoundation

@oceanicramsey with the gentle touch as Curly girl the tiger shark comes straight to her. The perception that sharks see people as a food source needs to be abolished. If sharks did actually hunt people as a food source, Interactions like this could not happen, I should have been shark bait 20 years ago, and sharks would actually kill more people than coconuts and selfies. On the extremely rare occasion we're sharks do bite people it is either mistaken identity or out of competition as an equal predator. Truth is humans are way more dangerous than sharks. Humans kill 70 to 100 million sharks each year and according to homicide reports world wide humans intentionally kill an average 500,000 other humans (not including fatalities occurring in fights of terrorism or war ) each year, while sharks mistakenly only kill an average of 10 people a year. #coexist #ApexPredatorNotMonster #helpsavesharks #changingperspective #stopsharkfinsoup #no #sharkfinsoup #curlygirl photo by #juanoliphant #juanito using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki @waterinspired @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaneducation @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaninspired @keiko_conservation @nakaweproject @oneoceanglobal @mission_blue @saveourseasfoundation

Cool 😎 photo of a sea turtle cleaning station by @blakethompsonphoto These Honu here are hovering over prominent coral heads where they will await their cleaning by fish 🐟🐠. Local fish species include the Hawaiian saddleback wrasse, convict tang and yellow tang (Zamzow,J. 1999). This behavior is a symbiotic relationship because the fish get food and the sea turtles are cleaned of unwanted algae, micro organisms, and in some cases harmful fibropapillomatosis!🤙🏽 Gotta love symbiotic relationships!Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster @alexisaraw

Within the Eastern Tropical Pacific, spinner dolphin groups can range across wide expanses. (Reilly, 1990). Hawaiian spinner dolphins travel in large pods, especially within pelagic areas. The movement of large groups of spinner dolphins may possibly promote greater foraging efficiency in the open ocean where prey presence is unpredictable. It may also provide greater protection from predators. (Gowans et al., 2008). In the Hawaiian Islands, the social structure of spinner dolphins differs between regions. (Andrews et al., 2010). Around the Big Island, spinner dolphins exhibit fission-fusion social structure. (Ostman, 1994). A fission-fusion society is one where animals can merge into the group, such as during rest, and split from the group, possibly into smaller groups, at other times, for example when hunting. Along Oahu, spinner dolphins are known to return to sites for long periods of time (Marten & Psarakos, 1999) and fission-fusion grouping. (Lammers, 2004). One of the biggest potential threats to Hawaiian spinner dolphins is the growing ecotourism industry and presence of shore swimmers along the islands. Because the species is active at night, daytime interactions can potentially inhibit necessary rest and sleep time (NOAA). Going out and seeing the dolphins is an amazing opportunity, but make sure if you choose to do so it’s with a responsible company that doesn’t force the interaction, alter or interfere with their natural lifestyle. With any ecotourism company, it is important that they don’t attract the animals with food, pose any dangers to the animals, and prevent guests from invading their personal space. At OneOceanDiving and @oneoceanresearch we use non-invasive research methods to minimize our impact as much as possible while providing an opportunity for guests to respectfully interact with the amazing marine life off Oahu in its natural environment. We also saw a pod of spinner dolphins on our way back to the harbor yesterday! 🐬🐬🐬 Post by: @sharksummers
Photo credit: @juansharks
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com>>

Mahalo @brtny_taylor for this #jawsome writeup! We can't thank you enough for using your voice to speak up for sharks 🦈. People will only protect what they love, and will only love what they understand. Very few people have had the opportunity to learn enough about sharks to properly understand them, and even fewer have seen sharks up close in their natural environment. Sharing simple messages like this can go a long way towards building support among the general public for their protection. #ApexPredatorNotMonster
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#Repost from @brtny_taylor "A few days ago I got the greatest opportunity to swim with about 20 #galapagos sharks. Despite what may seem alarming to some, these amazing creatures need our attention. Many species of sharks have suffered population declines up to 99%!! Why is this important? Since sharks are at the top of the food chain in the ocean, they have a significant impact on the ecosystem as a whole. They are considered the apex predators of the ocean and help keep the ecosystem intact by eating the old, sick, or slower fish in the population thus keeping the entire fish population healthier and in proper proportion. The list can go on and on about how we need sharks but most importantly, like all animals sharks have an intrinsic value that we need to appreciate and respect.
There are too many misconceptions about sharks, which leads to hunting and killing. If these bad asses wanted to bite me, they easily could have- they were swimming no more than 1 foot under my flippers. By the way, in the time that you read this entire post, about 190 sharks have already been killed.
I hope that just by seeing & reading this, I was able to change some perceptions on sharks. The ocean is their home, not ours. Let's make an effort to put our fears behind us and protect these animals. A huge thanks to @oneoceandiving @oceanicramsey @juansharks
@ge_keoni @sharkysophie
@blakethompsonphoto for such an unforgettable experience. I'm already counting down the next time I get to swim with these magnificent beauties. PS hello #msaloha"
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Had a pilot fish keeping the company of our sharks yesterday! She was mostly hanging with Marlu, a big Galapagos female, throughout the day. Pilot fish are in a mutualistic relationship with sharks, swimming alongside them with no fear of being eaten. In exchange for the safety of an apex predator’s company, pilot fish will eat parasites off of sharks in addition to any bits of food while the sharks are feeding!

Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> < Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

Great White sharks are part of the family Lamnidae, which is comprised of apex pelagic predators that cover temperate, tropical, and polar oceans (Compagno, 1984). Lamnidae are characterized by counter-current heat exchange, centralized slow-twitch muscles, and elevated metabolic rate which enable the sharks to maintain warmth (Graham et al., 1990). These adaptations are likely responsible for Whites’ thermal tolerance and high swimming performance (Bernal et al., 2005). White sharks make large transoceanic migrations repeatedly throughout their lifetime. White sharks have been known to migrate from the California coast to Hawaii (Boustany et al., 2002), from Australia to the North Island of New Zealand (Bruce et al., 2006), and have even been reported to migrate from South Africa to western Australia (Bonfil et al., 2005). Having the ability to maintain heat within the body (to some degree) is advantageous as it heats their muscles, allowing for longer and faster swimming, as well as increasing the rate of internal processes such as digestion (Goldman 1997; Hellman et al. 1997). That being said, Great White sharks are not warm-blooded animals in the way we are, but they are better equipped to resist temperature change than your average fish!. Photo credit: @juansharks
Post by: @sharksummers

Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website:  OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey

The Hawaiian monk seal was established as “endangered” under the US Endangered Species Act in 1976. Since then, their recovery has been the focused on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands area. (Baker & Johanos, 2003). Threats to the Hawaiian monk seal include human disturbance, fisheries interactions, entanglement in marine debris, intraspecific aggression, and starvation. (Carretta et al., 2002). Hawaiian monk seal populations are generally difficult to quantify. Aerial survey detection is less than 100% due to the altitude, speed, and turbulence of the aircraft and seals are not always on land. (Baker & Johanos, 2003). In the study done by Baker & Johanos, it was estimated that for every seal on the beach, 2-3 seals exist because of their swimming habits. Because it is difficult to get accurate population estimates for Hawaiian monk seals it is that much more important to protect this species. Reducing human influence by preventing human trash on beaches and influence of humans on primary inhabited beaches by monk seals is one way everyone can contribute to protecting this iconic species.
Post by : @sharksummers
Photo credit: @juansharks
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website:  OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> < Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster @blakethompsonphoto

Incredible shoot !!! Amazing place !! #ruta593 #AllInOnePlace #amagicaljourney #allyouneedisecuador #unrecorridomagico #ecuadorpotenciaturistica #travel #traveling #travelgram #hechoenecuador #instatravel #Placestovisit #vacationtime #turismo #tourism #instameec #photofotheday #bestmemories #mejoresrecuerdos #ecuador #Repost @juansharks
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Silky sharks during sunset at Darwin island in the Galapgos. #freedivingforacause for a project that @cressi1946 put together called the @galapagosevolution. Silky sharks are protected in the Galapagos islands but are in need of much more protection as they have large migration patterns. @nakaweproject Has a petition going on to help save them. Please take the time to #helpsavesharks. #ApexPredatorNotMonster @oceanicramsey @waterinspired @oneoceanresearch @oneoceaninspired @oneoceaneducation @oneoceandiving

Our favorite place to be as well🦈💙 With all the Galapagos around lately we've seen fewer Sandbars but we're still get a couple curious ones checking out all the excitement here and there!
#Repost @ambermozo ・・・
My favorite place to be 💙

Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website:  OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> < Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

Humpback whales of the North Pacific spend summer and winter off the coast of Alaska and Northern America (Calambokidis et al., 1998) and migrate to Hawaii, Mexico, and southern islands of Japan in the winter and spring (Darling & Mori, 1993). While in these warmer areas, humpback whales have been observed mating and calving, which often involves elaborate songs (Winn & Winn, 1978). Humpback songs are distinct enough to tell specific whale groups from one another. Groups of humpback whales that are geographically separated from one another are even noted to use the similar song structures even though the songs are  of different content (Payne & Guinee, 1983). Previously, humpbacks in Hawaii and Mexico were thought to change their songs in similar ways across mating seasons (Payne & Guinee, 1983), but a study done by Cerchio et al. (2014) discovered that some variables could cause inconsistency throughout mating seasons

Photo credit: @juansharks
Post by: @sharksummers

Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website:  OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> < Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

Sandbar sharks are found across the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans (Muller & Henle, 1841). Sandbar sharks can be distinguished by their relatively large first dorsal fin and the trailing white edges of their pectoral fins. Previous studies determined that Hawaiian sandbar sharks are smaller than their conspecifics in other areas (Muller & Henle, 1841). Hawaiian sandbars were found to average 5.5 embryos per litter (Wass, 1973) while Florida sandbar sharks were found to average 9 embryos per litter (Wheeler, 1965). There was found to be a positive relationship between the smaller size of Hawaiian sandbar sharks and their lowered fecundity, or reproductive output (Wass, 1973). The sandbar sharks in Hawaii are more at risk for population decline because of their smaller size and smaller litter. When comparing Hawaiian sandbar sharks to those in other areas of the world, it is important to take these factors into account when managing their conservation!

Photo credit: @juansharks
Post by: @sharksummers

Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website:  OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com> <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com <http://www.hawaiisharkdiver.com> < Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

World (Sea) Turtle day! And it just so happened to also land on #turtletuesday 😉🌏🐢 here is @oceanicramsey enjoying some time with the Hawaiian Green Sea turtle or Honu at #honuheaven. Can you count how many sea turtles are in the picture? Sea turtles have evolved to spend almost their entire lives in the water! They are adapted to sleep, eat and live in the ocean! However, the Honu is one of the species known to spend some time on land basking in the sun. ☀️ Since the Honu is a reptile it is ectothermic, relying on its environment to help regulate its body heat. So make sure to #selfie responsibly and enjoy the Honu!
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Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster @alexisaraw

#Repost @tracyann_saltygirl one of our research assistants and training shark safety divers showing a different view of a shark utilizing its amazing ampullae of lorenzini! Come out on a dive with us to learn why this shark is doing this! You should also read below 😉
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A prime example of why we ask guests to keep GoPros on extended poles. The electrical frequency that is emitted by GoPros gives the sharks ampullae of lorenzini a big sensory stimulation. Here you can see the shark going almost completely vertical to check out one the camera before we take off. These electroreceptors are jelly-filled pores on the sharks nose that can pick up on all electrical impulses within their range in the water, which is how they can determine which fish is the weakest within a school (all living beings emit a this). This helps keeps fish populations healthy so weak and sick fish don't get the chance to breed or spread disease. Many people think that sharks are a reason for fish population declines, when in reality it is the lack of sharks that is having a bad impact on healthy fish populations. Go over to @lwbean and check out her newly released book, "If sharks disappeared" for your kids, or yourself! #savesharks #itstheirocean #sharkconservation #marineconservation• • • Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

One Ocean Diving cofounder and head field researcher @oceanicramsey maintaining eye contact with a large female Galapagos shark known in our ID program as Mauka, who is named for her dorsal fin which is shaped like a mountain. Part of the research we do here at @oneoceanresearch consists of tracking seasonal movements by gender and species in order to better understand and protect sharks here in Hawaii. We use non invasive research tactics such as photo ID to minimize our impact while getting to know these sharks on an individual basis. Bring your #GoPro or camera on your next dive for a chance to name a shark if you get photos of a shark with distinct markings we have not identified yet! We are currently seeing several large female Galapagos sharks at our survey site including Mauka, Marlu, Ms. Aloha and Scoopfin. These boss lady sharks are generally more assertive than the males and are often observed swimming higher in the water column maintaining a dominant presence within the hierarchy. We usually see more of these mature females in the summer months, which may be related to their reproductive cycle. Galapagos sharks in Hawaii are thought to mate every 2-3 years during the winter and spring months followed by a gestation period of an estimated 12 months before giving birth to between 4-16 pups (Weatherbee at al. 1996, Meyer et al. 2009). _______________
Photo by @blakethompsonphoto
Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com>> & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey

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