#apexpredatornotmonster

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Lady sharks on lady sharks. PC @juansharks #apexpredatornotmonster

Sometimes I can not help myself, just want to hug them 🤗🤗 I miss sharks 💙🦈💙🦈💙🦈💙 #SaveSharks #LoveSharks #ApexPredatorNotMonster #Silky thx for 📹@taylermackenziie

Photo of the day from @juansharks!
"@oceanramsey and the worlds largest predator on the planet. One of the most incredible experiences of my life. Sharing it with @andycorbe and @lauracorbe just made it that much better. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #mobydick #spermwhale photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @xcelwetsuits while drinking @guayaki 🤙🏼@oceanramsey using @sanlorenzo_bikinis @oneoceandiving"

A morning dive with Tiger sharks!! Here you can see the two sharks that look like they sew holding fins 🦈😎 @silenthunterpty #sharkconservation #ApexPredatorNotMonster #panamavideographer #savesharks #sharkbehavior @reefhunter @seaforeverphotography @silenthunterpty

The African lion is very similar to sharks in regards to their role as key players in ecosystem balance. Lions are one of Africa's top predators and help to keep prey items on their toes at all times. What this means is that different seeds and soils that get stuck on grazing animals travel with them to help spread forages along the way. They won't stay in one place long if there are predators around so the constant moving means constant changing to grazing areas and no overgrazing will occur. If the herds of zebra, wildebeest, gazelle, and other ungulates have no reason to move around (lack of predators) they will destroy areas before moving on to the next. This will harm everything down to the structure of river beds and how they flow (watch "how wolves changed the rivers on YouTube for better understanding of this). The world needs our top predators in every ecosystem to keep balance and yet they are often the most vulnerable to being killed and going extinct. #savepredators to #savetheplanet #apexpredatornotmonster #africaneedslions #trophiccascade

so blessed to see this breathtaking view🦈💙 pc: @seajewl
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#stopsharkfinning #oneoceandiving #savesharks #healthyocean #apexpredatornotmonster

@oceanicramsey using @saltnairstudios seabob for surveying @oneoceandiving pelagic shark aggregate today. The seabob is the fastest underwater scooter ever made used most for productions. Photo by #juanoliphant #juanito @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @xcelwetsuits @guayaki #ApexPredatorNotMonster #coexist #helpsavesharks @miyamotoryan @jquickness @mikeprickett_

Free diving with Galapagos and Sandbar sharks! 😍 can't even express the feeling of sharing the water with these guys 💞 the media makes $$ portraying them as monsters #apexpredatornotmonster !! Respect these dudes 👊🏼 @oneoceandiving #savesharks #savetheocean

Flake. A popular seafood in #Australia and abroad. Ever heard of it? #Flake is #shark. My third day on the #SunshineCoast, I walked into a cafe selling this. I asked the cafe workers what kind of shark it was. "Either Gummy shark or #Blacktip Reef shark" they imparted. I then asked why they would sell it to customers since it's toxic for human consumption; shark meat is known to contain 42 x more mercury than is safe to eat (WildAid). The cafe employees shrieked; they didn't know. •

The manager then scurried in from the kitchen and chimed that they only kill the small sharks, which don't have that mercury buildup yet. "You kill baby sharks to sell the meat? You do know sharks are going extinct and catching the young prevents their populations from recovering?" Not to mention that sharks don't excrete their urine; they instead absorb urea back into their muscles (the meat that's sold), which is also toxic for human consumption. The manager looked nervous that I was causing such an uproar among the other customers and his employees, all clearly hearing this and audibly gasping. I just said its awful that they would contribute to sharks' #extinction and harm customers, and walked out with a disgusted look. I might not have made friends at that place.


So why not just call it shark? I think the flake market would collapse if most people knew what they were eating.

MOST RECENT

Did you know sea turtles are able to return to their specific nesting beaches no matter how many miles or years have passed (Lohmann, K.J. et al. 1997)? This is called natal homing and is made possible when hatchlings are first born and are imprinted by chemical cues from their natal beach (Lohmann, K.J. et al 2008). Despite it taking more than 20 years to reach sexual maturity, sea turtles are able to navigate to these nesting beaches by using the magnetic fields of Earth to determine a directional preference. During these long swims sea turtles are even able to understand their global position during these extensively long migrations (Putnam, N.F. 2011; Lohmann,K & Lohmann C 1996)
Photo by @juansharks with @allyswimfins on a tour with @littleoceantours
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Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaiiwith a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch@OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharksand our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanicramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/ 
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting 
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount#SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean#SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks#OceanConservation  #SharkConservation#ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

Thank you @miller_prime for coming out with us! Your support means so much to us. Helping to spread the word that sharks are vital to ecosystem success is so important. Sharks are #apexpredatorsnotmonsters 🦈💕🤙🏽 Shark fin soup is considered a delicacy in some cultures... but is it worth killing a whole shark for their fins, making up about 5% of their body... yet wasting 95% of the animal? From our perspective it's difficult to rationalize sacrificing the health and productivity of our oceans and the life they sustain for a toxic status symbol bowl of soup. Help put a stop to this. #helpsavesharks and say no to #sharkfinsoup and #sharkbasedproducts
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#Repost @miller_prime
Yesterday, along with getting in the water with these guys, I learned that 2-3 sharks are killed every second on this planet. That's 70-100 million per year. I'm not a biologist but I know that no ecosystems can exist healthily without their apex predator. #SaveSharks #SaveTheOcean
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @oceanramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

Remoras are fish that attach themselves to marine animals with their oval, ridged, unique sucking disk. Their sucking disk lays more dorsally on the head (Randall 2007). These remoras, also called sharksuckers or diskfish, are commonly found among sharks and rays (Randall 2010). They leave disk-shaped scars from where their mouth attaches to their hosts' body. In Hawai'i, the sharksucker #leleiona Echeneis naucrates (Linnaeus 1758) is not host-specific and can survive part-time with no host at all. They are the most common remora found inshore in the Hawai'ian Islands, and E. naucrates can attach to sea turtles, bony fish, and sharks (Randall 2010). However, species Remora remora can be found on Tiger Sharks. Young Remora remora, commonly called remoras, have been found to feed more on a host's parasites rather than the host itself (Randall 2007). Also, species Remorina albescens, commonly called the White remora, can be found on Manta rays (Randall 2007, Randall 2010). The White remora typically enters its host through the mouth and gill chamber. Members belonging to the family Echeneidae usually require a host for survival, but some are able to survive without one. Without sharks and rays, remora populations would deteriorate along with many other species populations. One organism impacts an ecosystem more than humans realize. By protecting sharks, we are giving help to other organisms who rely on sharks as well. Sharks help keep balance in our oceans. As remoras rely on elasmobranchs for survival, we in turn help them by helping sharks!
Post by @d.guerin8
Photo by @juansharks featuring @oceanramsey
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @oceanramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador

A beautiful image of a juvenile #HumpbackWhale coming in for a closer look at One Ocean Diving co founder @oceanramsey in the crystal clear waters of the Kingdom of #Tonga. Just a single generation ago these same whales were hunted as a food source, however, a royal decree outlawed the practice back in 1978. Since then this small pacific island has gained popularity as a destination for whale watching and interactions with one study estimating the value of the whales in excess of USD$700,000 as a tourist attraction (Orams 2010) proving these whales are #WorthMoreAlive. Being personally inspected by a playful humpback whale that is possibly seeing a human for the first time in its life can leave a lasting impression, but the tendency of this industry to focus mainly on mothers and calfs has raised concerns for potential to impact on the subpopulation's breeding success and recovery. Thankfully there are a limited number of licenses, strict rules and regulations in place that guide operators activities to minimize any potential impact and ensure long term sustainability. New training programs for guides based on empirical research have improved local knowledge, engagement and responsibility regarding the role of the guide and #ecotourism from a local to global perspective, and elicited a sense of national pride in leading the way for best practice in whale ecotourism in the South Pacific region (Walker & Weiler 2016). Commercial whaling dramatically reduced populations of whales similar to the degree of which sharks are being exploited today. It was only when whales were recognized as crucial natural resources and valued components of a healthy ecosystem that international frameworks for their protection and conservation were established. Every single baby whale seen today is a living reminder that humans have the capacity to change their ways and give wildlife we share the planet with the chance to recover.
#SpeakUpForNature #ForFutureGenerations #OfAllSpecies 🐢🐋🐬🦈 Post by @blakethompsonphoto
Photo by @oceanramsey #shotoniphone using the @aquatech_imagingsolutions #AxisGo water housing.

Did you know that a scientific classification for an animal isn't only genus and species? That is the shortened name following binomial nomenclature. However, an animal can be recognized by being categorized in (from broad to specific): Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, species. There are occasional subcategories but generally, these eight groups help to classify an organism and what it is related to. However, scientists only need the Genus and species to recognize an organism. For example, Carcharhinus plumbeus (Nardo 1827) or C. plumbeus is commonly known as the Sandbar shark. However, it belongs to the family Carcharhinidae. On our pelagic shark dive, we typically see Requiem Sharks, or sharks belonging to family Carcharhinidae. We typically see Galapagos, Sandbar, and sometimes Tiger sharks which are all a part of this family. In addition, the Gray Reef, Blacktip Reef, and Whitetip Reef shark are also a part of Carcharhinidae (Randall 2010). By using taxonomy and binomial nomenclature, scientists can record lineage and related animals. Sharks are classified under the order Chondrichthyes which includes sharks, skates, rays and chimeras. In the first systematic analysis of 1,041 globally distributed chondrichthyan fishes approximately 1/4 of them were considered threatened with extinction under IUCN criteria (Dulvy et al. 2014). This ancient group of animals with over 400million years of history on this planet are being pushed to the brink of extinction and the current generation likely represents the last one that can take meaningful action to ensure a future for these vital animals. Our collective actions as a species will decide what path we take and even changing a single action or habit in your everyday life can make in impact. Head over to co-founder @oceanramsey's account and check out her last whale photo for a list of 5 things you can do to help #SaveTheOcean!
Post by @d.guerin8
Photo by @juansharks

Shark and Sharka Inspo! Repost @nataliekparra with @repostapp
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I feel super fortunate to get to spend so much time working and playing with such an inspiring group of girls. All who have dedicated their lives to preserving the watery world they love and made A LOT of sacrifices to do so.
I think a lot of girls have a tendency to knock each other down a peg when they start to see each other succeed, even subconsciously. I've never understood where that comes from or at what ages it starts.
To know and work with people who celebrate each other's accomplishments and go out of their way to include others when they have an opportunity to do something amazing creates such a joyous and supportive environment.
I've always loved the phrase your vibe attracts your tribe. Surround yourself with people who make you smile and feel inspired, who realize life is too short to egg on negativity to simply have something to talk about, and who you can't wait to see live out their wildest dreams.
Photographed by the juan and only honorary seaster @juansharks. #mauisharkmermaid #mauimermaid #oneoceandiving #oneoceanglobalambassasor #helpsavesharks #saveoursharks #getinspired #getinvolved #apexpredatornotmonster #experiencethis #changeyourmindset #discovernature #connecttonature #itsallconnected #balancekeepers #escapetheordinary #worthsaving #worthfightingfor #adventurealoha #sharealoha #supporteachother #findyourtribe #encourageothers #believeinpeople #sharealoha #malamakai #sharka #nobluenogreen #nosharksnoblue 🦈Join the #SHARKAREVOLUTION to SHARe Kindness & Aloha🦈

#Repost @oneoceandiving (@get_repost)
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Mahalo nui to @ohsocurious and @oceanxplorer for coming out with us and sharing their experience with others! Many of our guests are surprised to see the reality of these often misrepresented and sensationalized animals, and we love being able to share the experience of interacting with sharks in their natural environment with others. As you can see by the photo with humans, fish and sharks peacefully coexisting they aren't mindless eating machines and have an important role to play in our marine ecosystems. Come meet these vital animals for yourself under the supervision of trained professionals by booking online at oneoceandiving.com! 🤙🏽🦈
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#Repost @ohsocurious ・・・
Free diving with these 🦈🦈🦈 creatures was magnificent. Sharks get a bad rep from movies and tv, but it was so easy to simply coexist with them underwater; no cage necessary. We swam with 23 Galapagos and Sandbar Sharks. The ocean is their home. Respect their home. Learned a lot from @oneoceandiving mahalo. 🙏🏽 ____________
Want to learn more?
Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @oceanramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/

Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

Mahalo nui to @ohsocurious and @oceanxplorer for coming out with us and sharing their experience with others! Many of our guests are surprised to see the reality of these often misrepresented and sensationalized animals, and we love being able to share the experience of interacting with sharks in their natural environment with others. As you can see by the photo with humans, fish and sharks peacefully coexisting they aren't mindless eating machines and have an important role to play in our marine ecosystems. Come meet these vital animals for yourself under the supervision of trained professionals by booking online at oneoceandiving.com! 🤙🏽🦈
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#Repost @ohsocurious ・・・
Free diving with these 🦈🦈🦈 creatures was magnificent. Sharks get a bad rep from movies and tv, but it was so easy to simply coexist with them underwater; no cage necessary. We swam with 23 Galapagos and Sandbar Sharks. The ocean is their home. Respect their home. Learned a lot from @oneoceandiving mahalo. 🙏🏽 ____________
Want to learn more?
Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water  in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @oceanramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/

Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

Little is known about the long-term movement patterns of Tiger sharks. This species is believed to be wide-ranging, and unpredictable (Meyer, C. G. et al 2009). Their visitation to certain areas may be spread out by absences of weeks, months or years (Meyer, C. G. et al 2009). This pattern of unpredictability may be an ideal foraging strategy for catching prey because it keeps the element of surprise alive. Despite the fluctuating movement of tiger sharks scientists believe that they use "cognitive maps" to move between foraging sites (Meyer, C.G et al 2010). Tiger sharks are able to move and navigate dynamically between expansive ranges and open ocean (Holland, K.N. et al 1999). 📸 by @oceanramsey of Curly girl 🐯🦈
Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @Oceanramsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1 Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting 
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

Lady sharks on lady sharks. PC @juansharks #apexpredatornotmonster

Sharks have an acute sense of smell and can smell blood in the water from miles away. •



#finbannow #apexpredators #apexpredatornotmonster #sharks #shark #lovesharkies #fisharefriends #fisharefriendsnotfood #sharksarefriends #sharksarefriendsnotfood #sharkawarenesssday2k17

Sorry i haven't been active i'll get better. Love you guys💙🦈

Green sea turtles are considered endangered around the world (Bowen et al., 1992). One of the threats facing green sea turtles is Fibropapillomatosis. This virus has unfortunately been spreading across the globe and infecting sea turtles. Fibropapillomatosis is a neoplastic disease specific to marine turtles that leaves tumors on the outer skin (Herbst, 1994). You can see that the female in this photo has a small tumor on her right eyelid. 📸 by @eliasharks
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Check us out at OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver

Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our #Education outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @Waterinspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @OceanRamsey Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal AmbassadorLooking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.FreeDiveWithSharks.com/Shop-1/
Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation  #SharkConservation #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster

Photo by @juansharks - we can coexist ・・・
@oceanramsey #Khaleesi #motherofsharks Yesterday was a day of days. This is Roxy swimming over the top of @oceanramsey and Moana. So So stoked Roxy is alive and doing good, last time I saw her she was super skinny and weak. More to come. 😉Pelagic diving @oneoceandiving with @seajewl and @sharkysophie. #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster #helpsavesharks #cagethefear photo by #juanoliphant using a @aquatech_imagingsolutions Ocean in her collaboration wetsuit with @xcelhaleiwa @xcelwetsuits @oneoceandesigns

The Tiger Shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, is sometimes referred to as the garbage can of the world's ocean due to their ability to scavenge and forage opportunistically. However, as you can see by this amazing photo by @oceanramsey of @juansharks in his tiger stripe @xcelwetsuits collab wetsuit coexisting with a large tiger shark we clearly aren't on the menu. Known in Hawai'i as "niuhi," they eat a wide variety of materials and animals. A nutritious diet consists of a number of different organisms that help keep tiger sharks healthy. Did you know that with age, a tiger shark's diet changes? As a juvenile, G. cuvier feeds on mainly bony fish which makes up most of their diet, but they will also feed on birds, octopi and squid. As a subadult, G. Cuvier also eats mainly bony fish which still makes up a large portion of its diet. Subadult tiger sharks also consume other sharks and rays, birds, crustaceans, land mammals, octopi, squid, and sea turtles. An adult G. Cuvier feeds on mainly birds, other sharks and rays, and crustaceans. Full grown tiger sharks also eat many bony fish, certain terrestrial mammals, sea turtles, octopi, squid, and some marine mammals. With an increase in size and age, tiger sharks expand their diet to more challenging, larger prey (Crow & Crites 2002). As a scavenger, tiger sharks tend to investigate possible prey that could simply be our trash. In Hawai'i, strange stomach contents inside a niuhi have included a raincoat, a chicken coop, a sack of potatoes, a driver's license, and coal (Crow & Crites 2002). As opportunistic predators, tiger sharks should not be ingesting random materials such as chicken coops! Consuming nutritious, natural prey items versus our garbage can help keep our systems in balance. Help keep the ocean free from our trash to help keep tiger sharks healthy. By recycling, minimizing single-use plastics, and volunteering at beach clean ups, tiger sharks have a better chance at staying healthy and keeping our oceans healthy by using top-down control of the food web!
Post by @d.guerin8
Photo by @oceanramsey

NOW IS THE TIME TO SPEAK UP FOR MARINE MAMMALS‼️ 🐬🐋🐳The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) is being reviewed for possible changes. These changes could decrease the safety and health of whales, dolphins, seals, or manatees... just to name a few. In Congress, oil affiliates have proposed to allow seismic airgun blasting and adding new areas for offshore drilling. If the proposed bill passes, oil companies that begin seismic airgun blasting and extend offshore drilling sites will put marine mammals in extensive risk. Seismic airgun blasting is a method to find oil and gas in the ocean floor. The blasts continue 24 hours a day and repeat every 10 seconds, which serves as an extreme stressor for marine life. These blasting cycles could last days to weeks at a time. The loud blasts disturb, injure, and often kill marine mammals, fish, sea turtle, and other marine life. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) and MMPA are the foundations in protecting marine life and conserving oceanic organisms. SPEAK UP AND SPREAD THE WORD‼️ Make your voice heard by reaching out to your member of Congress and telling them to #SAVETHEOCEAN 💙 Go to .
.
USA.oceana.org .
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To sign the petition and for more information
Photo by @juansharks of @oceanramsey in Tonga 🐋
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Want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: OneOceanDiving.com & JOIN US in the water in #Hawaii on #Oahu’s #NorthShore to #SwimWithSharks and #DiveWithSharksInHawaii with a @OneOceanDiving trained #MarineBiologist / #SharkSafetyDiver Check out our #Shark and #MarineResearch @OneOceanResearch and our outreach program @OneOceanEducation #LearnAboutSharks and our Non-Profit @WaterInspired conservation group and Founders: @Juansharks and @oceanramsey
Want to join the team? Become a @OneOceanGlobal Ambassador
Looking to support in other ways? Check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @OneOceanDesigns or at www.HawaiiSharkDiver.Com Mahalo and Thank you for Supporting
#InternationalSharkProject #HawaiiSharkCount #SharkResearch #Ocean #OneOcean #SaveTheOcean #SaveSharks #HelpSaveSharks #OceanConservation #SharkConservation
#ApexPredatorNotMonster

#Repost @juansharks (@get_repost)
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This is @ge_keoni getting close and personal with this tiger shark called Sparkles in our Field ID program @oneoceandiving. GE just finished his year training with us @oneoceanresearch and will be leading guest on pelagic dives and collecting shark behavioral data for our research. GE also loves sharing his Hawaiian culture and respect for his aumakua the Mano. Come just us @oneoceandiving @oneoceanconservation @oneoceaneducation on a dive to learn more about how important sharks are to the environment and to Polynesian culture. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #coexist #respect for #mano #helpsavesharks #stopsharkfinsoup @waterinspired @oceanicramsey photo by #juanito #juanoliphant #juansharks using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 while drinking @guayaki 😍🤙

I love sharks.

Having existed for 400 million years the biology of sharks has remained mostly unchanged. Apart from it’s size, Megalodon the biggest fish that has ever existed and rival to the size of today’s biggest whales, is the same as today’s white shark - it really is the greatest predator.

But sharks are being wiped out at a rate of 2-3 per second and 90-95% of many species' populations have been eliminated in just the past few decades. Persecuted by the media and Hollywood, caught for their fins in shark fin soup and medicines or hunted by fisherman for sport. As well as being caught up as bycatch and in general at risk from swindling fish stocks due to overfishing, they are in serious trouble.
On Friday a boat was caught illegally fishing in the Galápagos National Park, which has the greatest abundance of sharks in the world. Amongst its inventory is thought to be close to 10,000 sharks, including endangered scalloped hammerheads and silky sharks, as well as other fish too. A triumph but also a terrible loss.
We must do more to raise awareness and educate people that sharks play a vital part in the ocean’s ecosystem and they shouldn’t be feared, but respected.

The article is linked in my bio if you want to read more about the illegal haul.

Incredible photo of hammerhead shark migration by @kimberlyswimberly

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