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I almost had as much fun on the surface as I did underwater on our last Guadalupe trip. #GreatWhiteShark #breach We have a few last minute spots for our last trip of the year. October 30th to November 4th. Please email oneoceandiving@gmail.com or call 808 649 0018 to book this trip of a life time. #helpsavesharks #savethesharks @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceandiving @discoversharks @waterinspired @nina #finbannow #cagethefear #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster photo by #juanoliphant

Manta Rays can be found throughout the tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans (IUCN Redlist). They can occasionally be spotted in the Hawaiian waters, especially on the big island of Hawaii. The Giant Manta Ray can reach a disc width (DW) ranging from 700 cm to 910 cm DW. They may be big, but their diets actually consist of very small critters. Mantas use their brachial plates to filter through the water for plankton and other small fish while feeding. If you happen to encounter a Manta ray you might observe them swimming in different patterns.  They actually have three different methods of swimming: omega-shaped, U-shaped, and S-Shaped (Homma, Kimiya et al 1999). Another unique swimming pattern can be observed when they have a remora attached to their bodies, in which they will actually press their bodies against rocks In an effort to remove them. These ovoviviparous animals are particularly vulnerable to overexploitation as they can only give birth to one pup every two to three years. Through photographic evidence it has been documented that these gentle giants can live to be at least 20 years old based on reappearances over the years (Rubin 2002, G. Kodja unpubl. Data 2010). You can also identify one Manta Ray from another based on the spots they have on their bellies. They look almost like birthmarks, and the different patterns are unique to individuals. Another way to differentiate between individuals is the presence of any bite marks or scars they may have on their bodies.  This is very similar to how we identify the sharks that are sighted during our programs. If you come on a tour and happen to get photos of an individual with distinguishing characteristics we don't have in our ID catalog you can actually name the shark as well!
Post by: @flyingturtle13
Video by @alexis_underthesea off the big island of Hawaii

Many people perceive sharks to be aggressive man eating machines due to the depiction of sharks in the movie "Jaws". It is so sad to see that one fictitious movie has negatively distorted public perception on sharks for an entire generation. Unfortunately this idea of sharks being “man eating monsters” continues to be perpetuated in the mainstream media today, with recent movies like the Shallows and 40 Meters down. Sharks are so important for our marine ecosystems and are nothing like how they are portrayed in these films. #ApexPredatorNotMonster We often fear what we don't understand, in fact Peter Benchley ,the author of Jaws, changed his mind and after seeing the beauty of white sharks first hand. He later became an advocate for shark conservation and said "Knowing what I know now, I could never write that book today,”. Turn your fear into fascination and respect for these magnificent animals. If you want to learn more and experience white sharks first hand Ocean Ramsey and Juan Oliphant have a few remaining spots available on their last trip of the season to Isla Guadalupe, the best place in the world to see Great White sharks in their natural habitat. For more information go to http://www.freedivewithsharks.com/guadalupe-trip/ for more details on this once in a lifetime trip.
Post by @madi_makoff
INCREDIBLE PHOTO BY #JUANSHARKS @juansharks- White sharks are often said to have dead black eyes, but if you zoom in on the eye on the right you can see that in the right lighting they actually have a beautiful blue iris. #QuestionPerception

“I'm always hesitant to post mouth open shots of sharks because it's unrepresentative of normal encounters and reenforces the bad image sharks have. So it's important people understand the context of these shots. You will only see this sort of view when a shark is actually taking in some food, it is a split second that is easy to miss. The cool thing I want to show in this shot is the sharks ability to create suction to help catch it's normal prey, being shall fish. Some species like nurse sharks cab actually suck an animal out of its shell!!! #sandyfeet #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster” #repost from @andycorbe 🦈💙

Photo of the day from @juansharks!
"@oceanramsey and the worlds largest predator on the planet. One of the most incredible experiences of my life. Sharing it with @andycorbe and @lauracorbe just made it that much better. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #mobydick #spermwhale photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @xcelwetsuits while drinking @guayaki 🤙🏼@oceanramsey using @sanlorenzo_bikinis @oneoceandiving"

Like a angelica saint this great white shark goes vertical to the surface. The amount of surface breaching on my last trip to Guadalupe was one for the books. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #cagethefear #coexist #beauty #helpsavesharks #love #GreatWhiteSharks and this picture 😍🦈🇲🇽. Diving with @halepeno42 @oceanramsey @africajohn @abc4explore @silenthunterpty @oneoceanresearch @oneoceandiving @seajewl @reefhunter @waterinspired #savethesharks photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @north_sails @xcelwetsuits @guayaki @discoversharks

Tagging can be a very important tool in shark conservation and research, giving scientists valuable data to determine if sharks are coming back to specific areas during certain times of the year as well as revealing valuable insights about shark behavior. However, tagging has it's limits and certain methods can be very invasive. Non-invasive photo identification can also be used to distinguish individuals and monitor populations over time. For many species dorsal fins have become a great identifier. The dorsal fin is the fin located on the top of sharks, and its main purpose is working as a stabilizer to help them move through the water and guide them through turns (Lynch, A., 2014). The dorsal fins are important features in identifying sharks because they can contain different colored markings and distinguishing grooves. These fins can also used to identify the species of shark when shark finning occurs to determine if the species is a protected species (PEW Environment Group, 2007). The dorsal fin is also often seen gliding on the surface of the water in fictitious shark movies as these so called “maneaters” approach. This is a HUGE misconception in more ways than one! Sharks don't see humans as food and depending on the species it is actually relatively uncommon for the dorsal fin to break the surface as sharks generally tend to stay beneath the surface. Sharks are simply portrayed this way to save money on these movie sets as building a fin is much cheaper than a full shark (Martin, R.). Come out with us for a pelagic research dive to learn more about the numerous misconceptions surrounding these misunderstood animals.
Post by: @tayplay
Photo by @juansharks

The great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) is one of the shark species that has a special adaptation for hunting. If you have ever see photos or videos of a great white engaged in a predation attempt, you will sometimes notice their eyes roll back in their head as they are going in for their catch. This is actually a protection technique so that their prey does not hit their eyes (Hardenberg, M. 2012). They do this by actually rolling the eye completely back into the eye socket. Other species such as the tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) contain something called a nictitating membrane which is used to cover eye when catching prey. The eyes in various shark species vary dramatically and are uniquely adapted to their environment and preferred prey items. Sharks are often said to have a cat-like eye with the slit pupil center. However, in these species that roll their eyes back like the great white, often times the entire eye appears to be the pupil giving them a black button like appearance. Within the great white sharks, even with the ability to move their eyes around in the socket, research has shown that their eyes tend to focus forward and down (Martin, R.). The eyes are extrememly important to the sharks ability to hunt, navigate, and interact which is why on our dives we stress the importance of looking around and maintaining eye contact while swimming with these animals. Book a tour with us to see the eyes of a shark for yourself and for more about how to swim safely with these animals! If you're interested in getting a close up view of the eye of a white shark contact our office at 808-649-0018 or oneoceandiving@gmail.com for details about our last expedition to Guadalupe island of the season October 30-November 4th
Post by: @tayplay
Photo by @oceanramsey

I got caught flinching on this encounter as I was looking through the lens everything seemed so much closer. This image for me just provokes #respect and #beauty but I know for most this mouth wide open shot from one of the most misunderstood predator on the planet only inspires fear. Hope u can look past the Jaws if this image scares you and check out @oceanramsey @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanconservation @waterinspired for more information on how important sharks like great whites are to the health of our planet and how they do not target people as a food source. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #instagood #cagethefear photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 @guayaki @north_sails Diving with @oceanramsey @silenthunterpty @abc4explore @reefhunter @africajohn

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Manta Rays can be found throughout the tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans (IUCN Redlist). They can occasionally be spotted in the Hawaiian waters, especially on the big island of Hawaii. The Giant Manta Ray can reach a disc width (DW) ranging from 700 cm to 910 cm DW. They may be big, but their diets actually consist of very small critters. Mantas use their brachial plates to filter through the water for plankton and other small fish while feeding. If you happen to encounter a Manta ray you might observe them swimming in different patterns.  They actually have three different methods of swimming: omega-shaped, U-shaped, and S-Shaped (Homma, Kimiya et al 1999). Another unique swimming pattern can be observed when they have a remora attached to their bodies, in which they will actually press their bodies against rocks In an effort to remove them. These ovoviviparous animals are particularly vulnerable to overexploitation as they can only give birth to one pup every two to three years. Through photographic evidence it has been documented that these gentle giants can live to be at least 20 years old based on reappearances over the years (Rubin 2002, G. Kodja unpubl. Data 2010). You can also identify one Manta Ray from another based on the spots they have on their bellies. They look almost like birthmarks, and the different patterns are unique to individuals. Another way to differentiate between individuals is the presence of any bite marks or scars they may have on their bodies.  This is very similar to how we identify the sharks that are sighted during our programs. If you come on a tour and happen to get photos of an individual with distinguishing characteristics we don't have in our ID catalog you can actually name the shark as well!
Post by: @flyingturtle13
Video by @alexis_underthesea off the big island of Hawaii

We are very excited to announce we will be working with @thewhaledreamer helping to engage a wider audience in marine conservation and providing opportunities for direct action to help #SaveTheOcean! The Whale Dreamer is a two book series about a young girl who is called to by the whales to surface the dream of our future. Through a wild adventure through the deep oceans, this story addresses the 6th mass extinction and the state of the oceans.
This initiative inspires us because it uses story to engage their readers with getting involved in species and land protection. Readers are given opportunities to not only learn more about the state of the world, but how they can direct action and influence the communities they live in. You can learn more about them at http://www.thewhaledreamer.com or follow them on FB & Instagram. Stay tuned for details!
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#Repost @thewhaledreamer ・・・
We are thrilled to announce that @oceanramsey and @juansharks' @oneoceandiving will be joining us as ocean allies! We are especially inspired by their dedication to protecting marine life with how they use photography to help spread the message and connect with their audiences~
Photo by @juansharks 🐳

An amazing photo by @juansharks of white shark breaching at the surface! Did you know white sharks are known to display a similar but different behavior called spy hopping in which they lift their heads out of the water to look around for potential prey items that spend time on land such as seals? Learn about white shark behavior and so much more by joining us on our last expedition to Guadalupe Island, read below and contact our office for details!
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Repost @juansharks ・・・
I almost had as much fun on the surface as I did underwater on our last Guadalupe trip. #GreatWhiteShark #breach We have a few last minute spots for our last trip of the year. October 30th to November 4th. Please email oneoceandiving@gmail.com or call 808 649 0018 to book this trip of a life time. #helpsavesharks #savethesharks @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceandiving @discoversharks @waterinspired @nina #finbannow #cagethefear #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster photo by #juanoliphant

Diving in the bahamas you can find this majestic creatures.... cuando te encuentras un tiburón buceando....solo en bahamas! #shark #diving #sharkdive #apexpredatornotmonster #sharkconservation

Latest post via @juansharks ・・・
I almost had as much fun on the surface as I did underwater on our last Guadalupe trip. #GreatWhiteShark #breach We have a few last minute spots for our last trip of the year. October 30th to November 4th. Please email oneoceandiving@gmail.com or call 808 649 0018 to book this trip of a life time. #helpsavesharks #savethesharks @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceandiving @discoversharks @waterinspired @nina #finbannow #cagethefear #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster photo by #juanoliphant

Post via #oneoceanglobal ambassador @namsundri 💙
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Have you ever noticed an ingredient in your cosmetics, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, vitamins, or medications called "#squalene"? It's oil from a shark's liver, like the one I dissected from a #Mako shark today (#Isurusoxyrinchus). Any item that contains squalene paid for a #shark to be killed, just for its liver.

Modern society is one of blissful ignorance; it's convenient to buy these products and not even witness what had to happen in order to make them. Since the archaeological #Neolithic era beginning 17,000 years ago, human communities started to specialize their work and no longer needed to individually perform all tasks required to survive. I think this is when we separated from nature: we no longer had to engage with inhumane practices harming the environment in order to benefit from it. Blind consumerism. While that system isn't our responsibility, supporting companies that profit from inexpensive production by using ingredients like this is something we CAN control. What kind of business will your dollar finance?
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#HelpSaveSharks #SharkConservation #GlobalAmbassador #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster #SaveSharks #Science #MarineConservation STOP #SharkFishing #CatchAndRelease the post-release mortality rate is too high! say NO to #SharkFinSoup NO #SharkCulling #Cull @oneoceandiving @oneoceanglobal
Note: This shark liver was given to research after the animal had been caught from recreational #fishing.

I almost had as much fun on the surface as I did underwater on our last Guadalupe trip. #GreatWhiteShark #breach We have a few last minute spots for our last trip of the year. October 30th to November 4th. Please email oneoceandiving@gmail.com or call 808 649 0018 to book this trip of a life time. #helpsavesharks #savethesharks @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceandiving @discoversharks @waterinspired @nina #finbannow #cagethefear #coexist #apexpredatornotmonster photo by #juanoliphant

Words by @juansharks Like a angelica saint this great white shark goes vertical to the surface. The amount of surface breaching on my last trip to Guadalupe was one for the books. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #cagethefear #coexist #beauty #helpsavesharks #love #GreatWhiteSharks and this picture 😍🦈🇲🇽

#Repost @juansharks
・・・
Like a angelica saint this great white shark goes vertical to the surface. The amount of surface breaching on my last trip to Guadalupe was one for the books. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #cagethefear #coexist #beauty #helpsavesharks #love #GreatWhiteSharks and this picture 😍🦈🇲🇽. Diving with @halepeno42 @oceanramsey @africajohn @abc4explore @silenthunterpty @oneoceanresearch @oneoceandiving @seajewl @reefhunter @waterinspired #savethesharks photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @north_sails @xcelwetsuits @guayaki @discoversharks

Tagging can be a very important tool in shark conservation and research, giving scientists valuable data to determine if sharks are coming back to specific areas during certain times of the year as well as revealing valuable insights about shark behavior. However, tagging has it's limits and certain methods can be very invasive. Non-invasive photo identification can also be used to distinguish individuals and monitor populations over time. For many species dorsal fins have become a great identifier. The dorsal fin is the fin located on the top of sharks, and its main purpose is working as a stabilizer to help them move through the water and guide them through turns (Lynch, A., 2014). The dorsal fins are important features in identifying sharks because they can contain different colored markings and distinguishing grooves. These fins can also used to identify the species of shark when shark finning occurs to determine if the species is a protected species (PEW Environment Group, 2007). The dorsal fin is also often seen gliding on the surface of the water in fictitious shark movies as these so called “maneaters” approach. This is a HUGE misconception in more ways than one! Sharks don't see humans as food and depending on the species it is actually relatively uncommon for the dorsal fin to break the surface as sharks generally tend to stay beneath the surface. Sharks are simply portrayed this way to save money on these movie sets as building a fin is much cheaper than a full shark (Martin, R.). Come out with us for a pelagic research dive to learn more about the numerous misconceptions surrounding these misunderstood animals.
Post by: @tayplay
Photo by @juansharks

Have you ever noticed an ingredient in your cosmetics, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, vitamins, or medications called "#squalene"? It's oil from a shark's liver, like the one I dissected from a #Mako shark today (#Isurusoxyrinchus). Any item that contains squalene paid for a #shark to be killed, just for its liver.

Modern society is one of blissful ignorance; it's convenient to buy these products and not even witness what had to happen in order to make them. Since the archaeological #Neolithic era beginning 17,000 years ago, human communities started to specialize their work and no longer needed to individually perform all tasks required to survive. I think this is when we separated from nature: we no longer had to engage with inhumane practices harming the environment in order to benefit from it. Blind consumerism. While that system isn't our responsibility, supporting companies that profit from inexpensive production by using ingredients like this is something we CAN control. What kind of business will your dollar finance?
———————————————
#HelpSaveSharks #SharkConservation #GlobalAmbassador #ItsTheirOcean #ApexPredatorNotMonster #SaveSharks #Science #MarineConservation STOP #SharkFishing #CatchAndRelease the post-release mortality rate is too high! say NO to #SharkFinSoup NO #SharkCulling #Cull @oneoceandiving @oneoceanglobal
Note: This shark liver was given to research after the animal had been caught from recreational #fishing.

Scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) are a coastal pelagic species that can be found in many places around the globe including: the Galapagos, Malpelo, and the Gulf of California (NOAA). Many of the areas that they are found in are coastal warm temperate and tropical seas with depths of at least 275 m (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species). When they are fully grown they can weigh up to 335 pounds, reaching lengths between 5-11 feet.  One study found female scalloped hammerhead sharks move offshore to form a school when they are smaller than the males, feeding on pelagic prey items with grater predatory success. For this reason, the intermediate sized females have been said to grow more rapidly than the males do and mature at a size larger than males. Despite being the same age, females are larger than the males in order to support their embryonic young (Klimley, A. Pete 1987). Other studies have shown that the juvenile scalloped hammerhead sharks will live in nursery habitats until at least one year post parturition (Duncan & Holland 2006). They need these nursey habitats for protection and feeding grounds during times that they are especially vulnerable to predation.
The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species has classified the scalloped hammerhead sharks as endangered globally.  In the shark fin trade, these guys are highly desired because of the large size of fins they have.  Those fins are then used, in many cases, for shark fin soup.  There is no nutritional value to it and it can actually be hazardous to human health due to the bioaccumulation of toxins and heavy metals. Please, spread the word to put an end to the shark fin trade.  #FinBanNow
Post by: @flyingturtle13
Photo by: @camgrantphotography

The great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) is one of the shark species that has a special adaptation for hunting. If you have ever see photos or videos of a great white engaged in a predation attempt, you will sometimes notice their eyes roll back in their head as they are going in for their catch. This is actually a protection technique so that their prey does not hit their eyes (Hardenberg, M. 2012). They do this by actually rolling the eye completely back into the eye socket. Other species such as the tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) contain something called a nictitating membrane which is used to cover eye when catching prey. The eyes in various shark species vary dramatically and are uniquely adapted to their environment and preferred prey items. Sharks are often said to have a cat-like eye with the slit pupil center. However, in these species that roll their eyes back like the great white, often times the entire eye appears to be the pupil giving them a black button like appearance. Within the great white sharks, even with the ability to move their eyes around in the socket, research has shown that their eyes tend to focus forward and down (Martin, R.). The eyes are extrememly important to the sharks ability to hunt, navigate, and interact which is why on our dives we stress the importance of looking around and maintaining eye contact while swimming with these animals. Book a tour with us to see the eyes of a shark for yourself and for more about how to swim safely with these animals! If you're interested in getting a close up view of the eye of a white shark contact our office at 808-649-0018 or oneoceandiving@gmail.com for details about our last expedition to Guadalupe island of the season October 30-November 4th
Post by: @tayplay
Photo by @oceanramsey

@discoversharks #repost
words by @juansharks I got caught flinching on this encounter as I was looking through the lens everything seemed so much closer. This image for me just provokes #respect and #beauty but I know for most this mouth wide open shot from one of the most misunderstood predator on the planet only inspires fear. Hope u can look past the Jaws if this image scares you and check out @oceanramsey @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanconservation @waterinspired for more information on how important sharks like great whites are to the health of our planet and how they do not target people as a food source. #ApexPredatorNotMonster #instagood #cagethefear photo by #juanoliphant using @aquatech_imagingsolutions @xcelwetsuits @cressi1946 @guayaki @north_sails Diving with @oceanramsey @silenthunterpty @abc4explore @reefhunter @africajohn

Hammerheads will always be our favorites. Another phenomenal photo #Repost from @juansharks
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Greater Hammerhead are one of the most unique and beautiful sharks in our Ocean. In this photo @oceanicramsey meets this hammerhead shark on the sand. As large as theses hammerhead sharks are it is amazing to see how gentle and cautious they were approaching us. These sharks are very rare to so see and the only place I know where u can go and see them is the Bahamas @biminiscubacenter @oneoceandiving @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaned @oneoceandiving @oneoceanresearch @oneoceanglobal @oneoceaneducation @oneoceandesigns @oneoceanconservation @waterinspired #helpsavesharks #savesharks #oneocean #savetheocean #travel #explore #ApexPredatorNotMonster #we #need #sharks #for #healthy #ocean Photo by #JuanOliphant #juanito @aquatech_imagingsolutions @cressi1946 @xcelwetsuits @guayaki
Diving with @andycorbe @lauracorbe @discoversharks

More from Timor Leste. The company responsible is Pingtan Marine Enterprises, and they finance a large part of Chinas shark finning supply. “Though the crew was arrested, the private company still thrives on breaking international laws to feed the demand of the shark fin industry.” •••
Full article linked on our fb page ••• #shark #sharks #stopsharkfinning #endsharkfinning #bansharkfinning #china #sharklife #sharkconservation #sharkadvocate #apexpredatornotmonster

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