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From the #cradleoftheconfederacy to the #birthplaceofcivilrights: a #rainbow stretches over the city, from the #AlabamaStateCapitol, where the Ordinance of Secession was adopted and Jefferson Davis was inaugurated, to the historic Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, where #MLK helped organize the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. @spannwx

The ceiling of the dome of the Alabama state capitol building in Montgomery Alabama #architecture #alabama #montgomery #montgomeryalabama #dome #alabamastatecapitol

Montgomery, AL 📌đŸ—șđŸ‡ș🇾
#beautifulcity #montgomery #alabama #civilrightsmovement #alabamastatecapitol

Alabama State Capitol rotunda 4/50 #montgomeryalabama #alabamastatecapitol

Visit to the Alabama State Capitol in the Montgomery.

Alabama State Capitol is a National Historic Landmark.
We visited and toured as a stop off on a drive through Mississippi (State 25) to New Orleans, Louisiana (State 26). #alabamastatecapitol #capitolbuilding #capitol #statecapitol #montgomery #montgomeryalabama #alabama #al #usa #unitedstatesofamerica #unitedstates #roadtrip #usaroadtrip #travelblog #travelblogging #travelblogger #travelling #traveling #instatravel #travelgram #travelusa #discoverusa #exploreamerica #exploreusa #travelamerica #nationalhistoriclandmark #governmentbuilding

This is the cantilevered spiral staircase in the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery. Built by a former slave Horace King who used similar cantilever techniques when designing bridges. He later was a Republican member of the House of Representatives from 1868 to 1872. #architecture #statecapitols #alabamastatecapitol #montgomeryalabama #architecturalphotography #staircase #staircasedesign #cantilevered #canon5ds #24mmtiltshift

During his inaugural address on 14 January 1963, newly elected Alabama Governor George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever."
(Photo Bettman/ Corbis)
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The Rehabilitation of George Wallace - part 1/4.
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Montgomery, Alabama
George Corley Wallace, the former Alabama governor who once was regarded as one of the nation's most destructive racists, lay on his sickbed recently and told me of the thing he regrets most in his 72 years of life.
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His says his biggest mistake came during his 1963 inauguration as governor when he stood on a spot in the state capitol and shouted: "Segregation now! Segregation tomorrow! Segregation forever!"
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"I never should have said it, because it wasn't true," said Wallace, who said his health (his hearing is almost gone, but his mind seemed sharp) has nothing to do with his stance in favor of racial integration now. He says he realized in 1964, a year into his first term as governor, that racial segregation could not survive.
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"I saw then that a house divided could not stand - that black and white people had to live with each other," he said.
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Then why, I asked him, did he say "segregation forever"? Why did he stand in the door to block the admission of two black youngsters to the University of Alabama? Why in his 1970 campaign did he run ads saying, "Unless whites vote on June 2, blacks will control the state"?
(to be continued)
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Carl T. Rowan, Washington Post 5 September 1991.
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#governor #georgewallace #inauguration #address #alabamastatecapitol #montgomery #alabama #segregation #integration #president #johnfkennedy #civilrightsmovement #martinlutherking #nonviolent #movement #racism #birminghamcampaign #marchonwashington #ihaveadream #freedom #democracy #humanrights #equality #justice #education #blacklivesmatter

Selma to Montgomery March
#alabamastatecapitol

My tour guide for a tour of the Alabama State Capitol was Aroine Irby, who marched from Selma to Montgomery in 1965 and was on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on Bloody Sunday. Living history. | Alabama State Capitol, Montgomery AL
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Some history that took place here: "A commemorative brass marker in the shape of a six-pointed star is set into the marble floor of the front portico at the precise location where Jefferson Davis stood on February 18, 1861, to take his oath of office as the only President of the Confederate States of America...It was here that the third Selma to Montgomery march ended on March 25, 1965, with 25,000 protesters at the foot of the capitol steps on Dexter Avenue. Prominent protesters included Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, Coretta Scott King, Ralph Bunche, Roy Wilkins, Whitney Young, A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, John Lewis, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and Joan Baez. A delegation from the protestors attempted to see Governor George Wallace to give him a petition that asked for an end to racial discrimination in Alabama. The governor had sent word that he would see the delegation, but they were denied entry to the capitol grounds twice and told no one would be let through."
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#architecture #capitol #alabamastatecapitol #history #livinghistory #civilrights #ushistory #montgomery #alabama #weekendtrip #travel #igtravel #explore

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