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Danilis Paz, Brazilian professional model & Miss Recife 2017 city pageant contestant. @danilispazz Photo courtesy of @alicegmakehair
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#MarielleFranco, 38, a black #politician from #RiodeJaneiro, died fighting for the rights of #women and #favela dwellers. As a #councilwoman from the Maré favela, she denounced the #policebrutality that favela residents, most of them #black, regularly experienced.

Outstream Video
On Wednesday around 9:20 p.m., armed men gunned the #councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four to the head. Her driver, Anderson Pedro Gomes, also died. She had just left an event that she organized about black women’s #empowerment.

Her death touched so many people that supporters organized vigils and protests in more than 20 cities across Brazil. Most of these protests were against the genocide of black people in Brazil. For #AfroBrazilians, Franco proved that a black person from a favela could be #educated, have dignity and also fight against the #socialinjustice that black Brazilians suffer from every day. For women, she proved that they could overcome #sexism and machismo in #Brazil. But her death is hitting Afro-Brazilian women, who suffer the most from Brazil’s violent, racist and sexist society, the hardest. #melanin #panafrican #foodforthought #blackisbeautiful #blackwomenrock #blackboyjoy #blackexcellence #culture #blackmagic #ring #blackmenrock #embracebeauty #blackunity #blackmedia #blackgirlsrock #repost @merciful.melanin

#MarielleFranco, 38, a black #politician from #RiodeJaneiro, died fighting for the rights of women and favela dwellers. As a councilwoman from the Maré favela, she denounced the #policebrutality that favela residents, most of them black, regularly experienced.

Outstream Video
On Wednesday around 9:20 p.m., armed men gunned the #councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four to the head. Her driver, Anderson Pedro Gomes, also died. She had just left an event that she organized about black women’s #empowerment.

Her death touched so many people that supporters organized vigils and protests in more than 20 cities across Brazil. Most of these protests were against the genocide of black people in Brazil. For #AfroBrazilians, Franco proved that a black person from a favela could be #educated, have dignity and also fight against the #socialinjustice that black Brazilians suffer from every day. For women, she proved that they could overcome #sexism and machismo in #Brazil. But her death is hitting Afro-Brazilian women, who suffer the most from Brazil’s violent, racist and sexist society, the hardest. #melanin #panafrican #foodforthought #blackisbeautiful #blackwomenrock #blackboyjoy #blackexcellence #culture #blackmagic #ring #blackmenrock #embracebeauty #blackunity #blackmedia

Regrann from @qudash - #MarielleFranco, 38, a black politician from Rio de Janeiro, died fighting for the rights of women and favela dwellers. As a councilwoman from the Maré favela, she DENOUNCED the 👮 #POLICEBRUTALITY that favela residents, most of them black, REGULARLY EXPERIENCED.
On Wednesday around 9:20 p.m., armed men gunned the councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four to the head. Her driver, Anderson Pedro Gomes, also died. She had just left an event that she organized about black women’s empowerment.

Her death touched so many people that supporters organized vigils and protests in more than 20 cities across Brazil. Most of these protests were against the GENOCIDE of BLACK people in BRAZIL. For Afro-Brazilians, Franco proved that a black person from a favela could be educated, have dignity and also fight against the social #Injustice that black Brazilians suffer from every day. For women, she proved that they could overcome sexism and machismo in Brazil. But her death is hitting Afro-Brazilian women, who suffer the most from Brazil’s violent, racist and sexist society, the hardest. “She died because she was a combative black woman,” said Lua Nascimento, an Afro-Brazilian college classmate of Franco’s who attended a protest on her behalf in Salvador, Brazil. “She was EXECUTED because she was a black favela dweller who fought against the murder of black favela dwellers. The genocide of the black population continues in this country.”
#MarielleFranco #SayHerName #BlackBrazilians #BlackPeople of the Diaspora #Brazil #AfroBrazilians - #regrann

#MarielleFranco, 38, a black politician from Rio de Janeiro, died fighting for the rights of women and favela dwellers. As a councilwoman from the Maré favela, she DENOUNCED the 👮 #POLICEBRUTALITY that favela residents, most of them black, REGULARLY EXPERIENCED.
On Wednesday around 9:20 p.m., armed men gunned the councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four to the head. Her driver, Anderson Pedro Gomes, also died. She had just left an event that she organized about black women’s empowerment.

Her death touched so many people that supporters organized vigils and protests in more than 20 cities across Brazil. Most of these protests were against the GENOCIDE of BLACK people in BRAZIL. For Afro-Brazilians, Franco proved that a black person from a favela could be educated, have dignity and also fight against the social #Injustice that black Brazilians suffer from every day. For women, she proved that they could overcome sexism and machismo in Brazil. But her death is hitting Afro-Brazilian women, who suffer the most from Brazil’s violent, racist and sexist society, the hardest. “She died because she was a combative black woman,” said Lua Nascimento, an Afro-Brazilian college classmate of Franco’s who attended a protest on her behalf in Salvador, Brazil. “She was EXECUTED because she was a black favela dweller who fought against the murder of black favela dwellers. The genocide of the black population continues in this country.”
#MarielleFranco #SayHerName #BlackBrazilians #BlackPeople of the Diaspora #Brazil #AfroBrazilians

Thousands of people gathered in front of #RiodeJaneiro’s council chambers to pay homage to #Franco, who was buried Thursday night. To show their digital support for her, #Brazilians are changing their Facebook profile photos to those of Franco and using the hashtag #MariellePresente, which translates to “Marielle is here.” Amnesty International, the longtime leader of a campaign against the #genocide of #blackpeople in #Brazil, demanded that her death be rigorously investigated. With those nine shots, Franco became one more statistic in this genocide. Just over 50 percent of Brazil’s population of 200 million is black. But blacks account for 2 out of every 3 murders. They are also overrepresented in favelas where violence and murder of blacks by police are rampant. Last year, the Rio de Janeiro police force killed more than 1,000 people. Black women in Brazil also disproportionately suffer violence—a recent study revealed that young black women are twice as likely to suffer from murder as their white counterparts.

In September of 2016, Franco received the fifth-most votes—more than 46,500—to became a councilwoman representing the liberal Socialism and Liberty Party (#PSOL) in Rio de Janeiro. Her win was remarkable because she grew up in Maré, one of Rio de Janeiro’s #poorest and most dangerous favelas.

Franco was the only black female representative and one of seven women on the 51-seat council. During her campaign, which was branded with the feminist color of purple, she spoke openly of her favela beginnings and introduced 50 ideas to help women, #AfroBrazilians and favela dwellers. She maintained her campaign promise to help these populations, served as the president of the House Committee on #Women and led a committee that monitored Rio de Janeiro’s military intervention. - @the.root

Thousands of people gathered in front of #RiodeJaneiro’s council chambers to pay homage to #Franco, who was buried Thursday night. To show their digital support for her, #Brazilians are changing their Facebook profile photos to those of Franco and using the hashtag #MariellePresente, which translates to “Marielle is here.” Amnesty International, the longtime leader of a campaign against the #genocide of #blackpeople in #Brazil, demanded that her death be rigorously investigated. With those nine shots, Franco became one more statistic in this genocide. Just over 50 percent of Brazil’s population of 200 million is black. But blacks account for 2 out of every 3 murders. They are also overrepresented in favelas where violence and murder of blacks by police are rampant. Last year, the Rio de Janeiro police force killed more than 1,000 people. Black women in Brazil also disproportionately suffer violence—a recent study revealed that young black women are twice as likely to suffer from murder as their white counterparts.

In September of 2016, Franco received the fifth-most votes—more than 46,500—to became a councilwoman representing the liberal Socialism and Liberty Party (#PSOL) in Rio de Janeiro. Her win was remarkable because she grew up in Maré, one of Rio de Janeiro’s #poorest and most dangerous favelas.

Franco was the only black female representative and one of seven women on the 51-seat council. During her campaign, which was branded with the feminist color of purple, she spoke openly of her favela beginnings and introduced 50 ideas to help women, #AfroBrazilians and favela dwellers. She maintained her campaign promise to help these populations, served as the president of the House Committee on #Women and led a committee that monitored Rio de Janeiro’s military intervention. - @the.root

Auburn African American Research Library...Screening of maertrina da favela a film about a Brazilian percussionist and her mission to help orphaned and at risk youth from the drugs and violence in the slums of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
#AfroBrazilians #BlackHealth #music #SaveOurYouth #Purcussionist #PanAfrican #MusicLover #Atlanta #FilmFestival #Culture #FalaniAfrika #RBG #Empowerment #Documentary #AuburnResearchLibrary #LangstonHughes #GirlsNightOut #EducateYourself

👀👀👀 😔😔😔 #MarielleFranco, 38, a #Black #politician from #RiodeJaneiro, died fighting for rights of women and favela-dwellers. As a councilwoman from the #Maréfavela, she denounced the #PoliceBrutality that favela residents, most of them black, regularly experienced.

On Wednesday around 9:20 p.m., armed men gunned the councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four shots to the head. Her driver, #AndersonPedroGomes, also died. She had just left an event that she organized about black women’s empowerment.

Her death touched so many people that supporters organized vigils and protests in more than 20 cities across #Brazil. Most of these protests were against the genocide of black people in Brazil. For #AfroBrazilians, #Franco proved that a black person from a #favela could be educated, have dignity, and also fight against the #socialinjustice that they suffer from every day. For women, she proved that they could overcome sexism and machismo in Brazil. But her death is hitting Afro-Brazilian women, who suffer the most from Brazil’s violent, racist and sexist society, the hardest. “She died because she was a combative black woman,” said #LuaNascimento, an Afro-Brazilian college classmate of Franco who attended a protest on her behalf in #Salvador. “She was executed because she was a black favela-dweller who fought against the murder of black favela dwellers. The genocide of the black population continues in this country. ”

Thousands of people gathered in front of Rio de Janeiro’s council chambers to pay homage to Franco, who was buried Thursday night. To show their digital support for her, Brazilians are changing their #Facebook profile photos to those of Franco and using the hashtags, #MariellePresente, which translates into “#Marielle is here.”

Regrann from @kishlb - The #selfsufficiency exhibited in “#BlackPanther’s” #Wakanda has inspired thousands of #AfroBrazilians to look to their own for #economic and #entrepreneurial support.

As a nation of over 100 million Black and brown people, #Brazil stands as one of the top five international markets for the blockbuster film, which has already raked in almost $1 billion worldwide, according to #QuartzAfrica. Cue the birth of the “#Blackmoney”movement.

Afro-Brazilians have organized all–Black screenings of the film in cities nationwide, such as a group in #SãoPaulo whose private showing featured marketing for #Blackowned businesses rather than previews for upcoming films. Meanwhile, in #RiodeJaniero, #BlackBrazilians held what is called “#rolezinhos” at shopping malls usually reserved for the white elite as a way to protest #racialexclusion.
The film’s success has since sparked a movement representing the idea that Afro-Brazilians can use their funds to support Black businesses, an idea that’s gaining steam and has even crossed into the mainstream media. “For us, the success of ‘Black Panther’ was a grand example of how much we have to consume and it also showed the potential of how we can consume products that are related to our representation, products that will respect our culture,” Rodrigo França, an actor who organized the all-Black viewing in Rio, told Quartz Africa. “If we stop buying from racist companies and companies that do not engage in diversity, those companies will not survive.” The idea of Afro Brazilians pooling their money to support something that’s Black or Black-owned isn’t as common but the tides are changing.

We don’t have this culture for money to leave black hands and go directly into another black person’s hands,” França added. “Due to the myth of the racial democracy, some Black people think it doesn’t matter if they support Black products.” Black Brazilians hold both economic and entrepreneurial potential, as Black folks comprise the majority of business owners in Brazil. Most are one-person businesses, however, as Black people have historically been shut out from building wealth via large-scale entrepreneurship simply becaus

The #selfsufficiency exhibited in “#BlackPanther’s” #Wakanda has inspired thousands of #AfroBrazilians to look to their own for #economic and #entrepreneurial support.

As a nation of over 100 million Black and brown people, #Brazil stands as one of the top five international markets for the blockbuster film, which has already raked in almost $1 billion worldwide, according to #QuartzAfrica. Cue the birth of the “#Blackmoney”movement.

Afro-Brazilians have organized all–Black screenings of the film in cities nationwide, such as a group in #SãoPaulo whose private showing featured marketing for #Blackowned businesses rather than previews for upcoming films. Meanwhile, in #RiodeJaniero, #BlackBrazilians held what is called “#rolezinhos” at shopping malls usually reserved for the white elite as a way to protest #racialexclusion.
The film’s success has since sparked a movement representing the idea that Afro-Brazilians can use their funds to support Black businesses, an idea that’s gaining steam and has even crossed into the mainstream media. “For us, the success of ‘Black Panther’ was a grand example of how much we have to consume and it also showed the potential of how we can consume products that are related to our representation, products that will respect our culture,” Rodrigo França, an actor who organized the all-Black viewing in Rio, told Quartz Africa. “If we stop buying from racist companies and companies that do not engage in diversity, those companies will not survive.” The idea of Afro Brazilians pooling their money to support something that’s Black or Black-owned isn’t as common but the tides are changing.

We don’t have this culture for money to leave black hands and go directly into another black person’s hands,” França added. “Due to the myth of the racial democracy, some Black people think it doesn’t matter if they support Black products.” Black Brazilians hold both economic and entrepreneurial potential, as Black folks comprise the majority of business owners in Brazil. Most are one-person businesses, however, as Black people have historically been shut out from building wealth via large-scale entrepreneurship simply because they lack the capital

#BlackandBilingual RIO DE JANEIRO (aka January River) is the 6th largest city in the Western Hemisphere. During the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Rio de Janeiro was a major port. About 2 million slaves were brought to Rio de Janeiro making it the largest slave port in the world. Today, Afro-Brazilians make up more than half of Rio's population. #Rio #365Black #AfroBrazilians #BlackHistoryWorldwide #slavetrade #AfricanDiaspora

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