#VoteHistory

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#Repost @amhistorymuseum
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Today in 1881, the humor magazine "Puck" celebrated the revolutionary potential of the glass ballot box.🗳 Widely adopted in the late 1800s, the glass ballot box became a potent symbol for political reform. Supporters of the new boxes believed that the their transparency would prevent misconduct at the polls. Many—like the illustrators for "Puck"—hoped the boxes would break the political power of political "machines" like New York City's Tammany Hall.💥 Others were more skeptical about the effects glass ballot boxes would have on elections. Critics warned that the new boxes couldn't guarantee that all Americans had access to the polls, or that voters wouldn't face violence and other forms of intimidation when they went to cast their ballot.☑️ Swipe to see examples of glass ballot boxes from our collections.☝️ #TDIH #OnThisDay #OTD #VoteHistory #ElectionHistory #PoliticalHistory #PresidentialHistory #AmericanHistory #NYCHistory#Civics #Invention #Innovation #Voting #Election #Election2018 #DemocracyInObjects #MachineryOfDemocracy #AmericanDemocracy #NationWeBuildTogether

Today in 1881, the humor magazine "Puck" celebrated the revolutionary potential of the glass ballot box.🗳 Widely adopted in the late 1800s, the glass ballot box became a potent symbol for political reform. Supporters of the new boxes believed that the their transparency would prevent misconduct at the polls. Many—like the illustrators for "Puck"—hoped the boxes would break the political power of political "machines" like New York City's Tammany Hall.💥 Others were more skeptical about the effects glass ballot boxes would have on elections. Critics warned that the new boxes couldn't guarantee that all Americans had access to the polls, or that voters wouldn't face violence and other forms of intimidation when they went to cast their ballot.☑️ Swipe to see examples of glass ballot boxes from our collections.☝️ #TDIH #OnThisDay #OTD #VoteHistory #ElectionHistory #PoliticalHistory #PresidentialHistory #AmericanHistory #NYCHistory#Civics #Invention #Innovation #Voting #Election #Election2018 #DemocracyInObjects #MachineryOfDemocracy #AmericanDemocracy #NationWeBuildTogether

#Repost @nmaahc
African American women were largely excluded from the growing women’s suffrage movement because of their race. Early suffragettes like Mary Church Terrell and Charlotte Forten Grimke took up the cause, despite the racism they faced. In 1913, Ida B. Wells formed the Alpha Suffrage Club, believed to be the first organization focused on African American women’s suffrage in the United States.
After the passage of the 19th Amendment, African American women still faced barriers exercising their right to vote. This could include waiting hours to register, facing violence, or taking new tests. #VoteHistory #ANationsStory 📸: Cihak and Zima/University of Chicago Photographic Archive

From @charlesmblow - ・・・
On March 31, 1870, one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment, Thomas Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election. The 15th Amendment promised, but did not enforce equal voting rights. The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by Congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts were meant to protect African Americansʼ right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and receive equal protection of laws.
The Enforcement Acts increased federal penalties for voter intimidation, particularly by White terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. However, events like the 1873 Colfax Massacre, where 150 black men were murdered by white Southerners, still occurred. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and more also kept many African American voters disfranchised. #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney
📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. - #regrann

Double up #thankful today! I’m so thankful I live in a country where #voting still matters and that as a #woman I have the right to #vote. I’m also #grateful and #proud that this is the first #election that my #daughter could #cast her first #ballot. And - yes- this #mom does #backgroundchecks AND #voterregistration and #votehistory checks. If you aren’t out here bumping vote numbers you can bump that lame effort for her number! 🗳 🇺🇸💁🏻‍♀️✊🏼 (I also find it hysterical that I look so sus in this pic .. like “heyyyy kids, wanna come see a .... ballot?!?! We have ... stickers too...”. 👀)

#Repost via @nmaahc ・・・
The grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.
It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory
📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.

#Repost @nmaahc with @get_repost
・・・
The grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.
It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory
📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.

@Regran_ed from @blackgirlsrock - “On March 31, 1870, one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment, Thomas Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election. The 15th Amendment promised, but did not enforce equal voting rights. The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by Congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts were meant to protect African Americansʼ right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and receive equal protection of laws.
The Enforcement Acts increased federal penalties for voter intimidation, particularly by White terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. However, events like the 1873 Colfax Massacre, where 150 black men were murdered by white Southerners, still occurred. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and more also kept many African American voters disfranchised.” - @nmaahc #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. - #regrann

It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 #VotingRightsAct. #ivoted #govote #everyvotecounts #VoteHistory #ANationsStory #nmaahc via @nmaahc

#Repost from @nmaahc with @regram.app ... On March 31, 1870, one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment, Thomas Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election. The 15th Amendment promised, but did not enforce equal voting rights. The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by Congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts were meant to protect African Americansʼ right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and receive equal protection of laws.
The Enforcement Acts increased federal penalties for voter intimidation, particularly by White terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. However, events like the 1873 Colfax Massacre, where 150 black men were murdered by white Southerners, still occurred. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and more also kept many African American voters disfranchised. #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

#Repost from @nmaahc with @regram.app ... The grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.
It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory
📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.

Why I vote. || #Repost @nmaahc
・・・
The grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.
It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory
📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.

#Repost from @nmaahc with @regram.app ... African American women were largely excluded from the growing women’s suffrage movement because of their race. Early suffragettes like Mary Church Terrell and Charlotte Forten Grimke took up the cause, despite the racism they faced. In 1913, Ida B. Wells formed the Alpha Suffrage Club, believed to be the first organization focused on African American women’s suffrage in the United States.
After the passage of the 19th Amendment, African American women still faced barriers exercising their right to vote. This could include waiting hours to register, facing violence, or taking new tests. #VoteHistory #ANationsStory 📸: Cihak and Zima/University of Chicago Photographic Archive

The #grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that *****the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.*******
👉🏿👉🏿👉🏿It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. 👈🏿👈🏿👈🏿👈🏿👈🏿👈🏿In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory // source nmaahc 📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.

African American women were largely excluded from the growing women’s suffrage movement because of their race. Early suffragettes like Mary Church Terrell and Charlotte Forten Grimke took up the cause, despite the racism they faced. In 1913, Ida B. Wells formed the Alpha Suffrage Club, believed to be the first organization focused on African American women’s suffrage in the United States.
After the passage of the 19th Amendment, African American women still faced barriers exercising their right to vote. This could include waiting hours to register, facing violence, or taking new tests. #VoteHistory #ANationsStory // nmaahc 📸: Cihak and Zima/University of Chicago Photographic Archive

#Repost @nmaahc with @get_repost
・・・
African American women were largely excluded from the growing women’s suffrage movement because of their race. Early suffragettes like Mary Church Terrell and Charlotte Forten Grimke took up the cause, despite the racism they faced. In 1913, Ida B. Wells formed the Alpha Suffrage Club, believed to be the first organization focused on African American women’s suffrage in the United States.
After the passage of the 19th Amendment, African American women still faced barriers exercising their right to vote. This could include waiting hours to register, facing violence, or taking new tests. #VoteHistory #ANationsStory 📸: Cihak and Zima/University of Chicago Photographic Archive

#Repost @nmaahc with @get_repost
・・・
On March 31, 1870, one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment, Thomas Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election. The 15th Amendment promised, but did not enforce equal voting rights. The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by Congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts were meant to protect African Americansʼ right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and receive equal protection of laws.
The Enforcement Acts increased federal penalties for voter intimidation, particularly by White terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. However, events like the 1873 Colfax Massacre, where 150 black men were murdered by white Southerners, still occurred. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and more also kept many African American voters disfranchised. #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

#Repost @nmaahc
The grandfather clause, enacted by seven Southern states between 1895 and 1910, was enforced to deny suffrage to African Americans. The Grandfather Clause stated that individuals who voted prior to 1866 or 1867, and their descendants, were exempt from educational, property, or tax requirements for voting. SCOTUS declared in 1915 that the grandfather clause was unconstitutional because it violated equal voting rights.
It took 95 years—3 generations of African American voters—after the 1870 Enforcement Acts, before Congress would enforce equal voting rights for African Americans with the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. In 2013, SCOTUS struck down a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, holding that the racist practices which necessitated the law no longer present a problem. See our previous posts for more #VoteHistory! #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory
📸: Photographic print of a man with “Vote” face paint in the Selma-Montgomery march, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Elmer J. Whiting, III.
#Vote

VOTE‼️ 🗳 #Repost @nmaahc
On March 31, 1870, one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment, Thomas Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election. The 15th Amendment promised, but did not enforce equal voting rights. The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by Congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts were meant to protect African Americansʼ right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and receive equal protection of laws.
The Enforcement Acts increased federal penalties for voter intimidation, particularly by White terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. However, events like the 1873 Colfax Massacre, where 150 black men were murdered by white Southerners, still occurred. Poll taxes, literacy tests, and more also kept many African American voters disfranchised. #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory 📸: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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