[PR] Gain and Get More Likes and Followers on Instagram.

#PIAguesthostGlennAdamson

MOST RECENT

Our second #PIApink ✨🌷WINNER🌷✨ is Mara Superior (@mara_superior) who writes: "technically speaking, a passion for pink copper fuming on porcelain in a reduction fired kiln has been one of my life's obsessions." We can't argue with that! The subtle halo of pink that surrounds the deeper red areas is difficult to control and impossible to predict. It involves an element of chance, which makes the appearance of pink on a porcelain surface all the more delightful when it occurs.

#PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink #PIAWinner

Our first #PIApink ✨🌸 WINNER 🌸✨is Hana Hybs (@hanahybs)! She writes: "Made this weirdly shaped vase. Not everything is a success, but it’s all part of a journey, even if we don’t quite know where we’re going at the time." Weird or not, it beautifully complements a cluster of peonies in bloom, and actually reminds us a little of a Hans Coper vessel, if only he had gone through a pink phase. Stay tuned for Winner No. 2 later today! 🏆

#PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink #PIAWinner

It looks pink... but is it? Los Angeles potter Adam Silverman (@adamsilvermanstudio) creates the thickly encrusted surfaces of his pots through multiple glazings and firings, using unexpected color combinations. The first layer on this particular vessel is black, which is then covered with green, then red, then white, proceeding from dark to light. There's a lot more to the glaze than "pure pink," Silverman told us, "whatever that means.” - @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson
#PIApink

Hans Tan’s porcelain is showing its spots! These mesmerizing pieces, with flashes of vivid green and pink, are from the Singapore-based designer’s “spotted nonya” series. If they seem almost-recognizable, you’re right: Tan’s creations start out as existing pieces of Nyonya porcelain, which are traditional vessels used among Peranakans, the descendants of Chinese immigrants who settled in the Malay archipelago (then British Malaya, now Malaysia and Singapore) between the 15th-17th centuries. Tan applies a pattern of dots across their surfaces, using a technique that’s similar in concept to wax-resist dyeing. The exposed areas are sandblasted, and the dot-protected areas retain their original pattern, making the surface of the piece appear as though it were tiled with circular pieces of brightly colored ceramic. Spotted Nyonya wares were given the “Les Découvertes” award (most innovative new work) at Maison & Objet 2011 in Paris, and Design of the Year at the President's Design Award 2012. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

When we think of the Russian avant garde, we think red and black, not pink. So we were surprised to find this 1918 platter by Sergei Chekhonin, first director of the State Porcelain Factory under the Soviets. The Cyrillic text reads, “Autographs of the Architects of the Great Russian October Revolution,” and those signatures appear around the platter’s rim. Under Chekhonin’s leadership, artists mixed symbols of the revolution like the hammer and sickle with new abstraction and folk motifs. The pink sun seen here seems to face both forward and back in history: an emblem of revolutionary power and a reassuring echo of traditional porcelain decoration. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher
#PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

A large plate, 18.5", with a land or skyscape pattern. I find it's good to get some professional shots taken a couple of times a year, and Bruce Spielman @spruce16 does such a good job.

Fade to white: in her work "Metamorphoses," the London-based artist
Irina Razumovskaya (@irina.r.art) reflects on her memories of working in a ceramics factory, which got her interested in repetition, and the act of casting a simple object over and over. This piece repeats a form, diminishing its pigment as the rough edges grow and expand. It starts out as cleanly geometric, and becomes messy and expressive as it unfolds. The use deepening pink could suggest a human body going through its own biological changes. Razumovskaya’s work won first prize at the 18th Angelina Alós Ceramic Bienniale in Esplugues, Spain. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher
#PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

I'm mesmerized by today's #PIApink video! 🌸🍬 via @potsinaction:
Wagashi (和菓子) are traditional Japanese sweets, typically made from bean paste and mochi, a kind of squishy rice cake. This video shows a craftsman making a cherry blossom form from shiro-an (white bean paste), some tinted pink. The process, which includes the use of a specialized wooden tool, is strikingly similar to working with clay. Because the paste is slightly translucent, the white filling shows through the pink wrapping, making each petal paler toward the center. Video courtesy of Japanology NHK World (Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpzlMvjPuTY) - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

Wait for it plus 🎧! Wagashi (和菓子) are traditional Japanese sweets, typically made from bean paste and mochi, a kind of squishy rice cake. This video shows a craftsman making a cherry blossom form from shiro-an (white bean paste), some tinted pink. The process, which includes the use of a specialized wooden tool, is strikingly similar to working with clay. Because the paste is slightly translucent, the white filling shows through the pink wrapping, making each petal paler toward the center. Video courtesy of Japanology NHK World (Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpzlMvjPuTY) - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

At last, pink clay! We’ve looked at pink glazes, spray paint, and jewels, and today Simon Levin (@woodfire) shows us some amazing pink clay from Mobile Bay, Alabama. Simon and @ZachSierkePottery ventured out to the clay cliffs at Ecor Rouge (Red Bluffs) which has been the site of pottery production since the 1800s. The beaches along the Bay each have their own story to tell, strewn with salt glazed kiln bricks, pottery shards, and wadding, depending on what was being made in that spot. Ecor Rouge ceramics differ from other pottery traditions in the South thanks to the unique chemical profile of the clay here,
which include alluvial clays with lots of iron. Zach writes: "For the follower of southern jug-making traditions, the eastern shore is an anomaly. Unlike much of the southeast, who gained their pottery techniques through Appalachia's low-slung ground-hog kiln and alkaline glaze traditions, the Ecor Rouge pottery families mainly immigrated directly from France in the late 1700's and early 1800's. They brought with them salt-glaze traditions and taller kiln designs with ample kiln furniture to support the ware. The cliffs themselves are a unique geological outcropping of two separate geological epochs (one alluvial and one marine/estuarine) and both containing a variety of ceramic-quality clays. The alluvial clays are kaolinic and range through a bright variety of iron oxide colors. The older, marine clays are finer grained, contain reduced iron, and more organic matter." A native of the area, Zach uses the local clay as one way to connect his ceramic work to the context and culture of coastal Alabama. -
@unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson
#PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink
#PIAguesthostSimonLevin

Beth Katleman’s (@bethkatleman) “Folly” usually floats against a sea of light blue, but a glittering photo shoot for @harpersbazaarus gave this sculptural work a temporary new color palette, and we at @unthinkpink approve! To celebrate the completion of Katleman’s custom porcelain installation for @Dior's Hong Kong flagship showroom, Harper’s staged some of the vignettes from Folly with real jewels for its September, 2015 issue. Folly’s figurines are actually cast from the most ordinary of playthings: souvenirs, trinkets, and outgrown plastic toys, so the pairing of this piece with precious gems packs a conceptual punch. Folly’s queen-for-a-day borrowed jewels include pieces by Dior Fine Jewelry, Van Cleef & Arpels, Chanel, Piaget, Chopard, and Tiffany. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

Post by @potsinaction
Beth Cavener (@bethcavener) has her studio in downtown Helena, Montana, where she sculpts emotive, haunting animal figures from clay. Her rabbits and foxes in particular are muscular and powerful, almost horse-like, yet they’re often posed in a way that suggests vulnerability. This 2016 work, "Unrequited” (Variation in Pink), was created with a surprising material: resin-infused refractory material, and of course, pink paint. 📷 via @cfileonline. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink
(via #InstaRepost #Repost @Fluxtechsolutions)

#Repost @potsinaction
・・・
Beth Cavener (@bethcavener) has her studio in downtown Helena, Montana, where she sculpts emotive, haunting animal figures from clay. Her rabbits and foxes in particular are muscular and powerful, almost horse-like, yet they’re often posed in a way that suggests vulnerability. This 2016 work, "Unrequited” (Variation in Pink), was created with a surprising material: resin-infused refractory material, and of course, pink paint. 📷 via @cfileonline. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

Beth Cavener (@bethcavener) has her studio in downtown Helena, Montana, where she sculpts emotive, haunting animal figures from clay. Her rabbits and foxes in particular are muscular and powerful, almost horse-like, yet they’re often posed in a way that suggests vulnerability. This 2016 work, "Unrequited” (Variation in Pink), was created with a surprising material: resin-infused refractory material, and of course, pink paint. 📷 via @cfileonline. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

A deep pink background makes @meissen_porcelain the star of this exquisite room, the Sala Rose at the Neoclassical Palácio da Ajuda in Lisbon, Portugal. Each piece of furniture includes some ceramic element, from the sideboard to the chair and bookcase, which supports an elaborate porcelain candelabra. With everything else pink, the white clay becomes a striking visual element in its own right. Via @palacioajuda. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink

Our series at @potsinaction continues ・・・
Nicole Cherubini, currently based in Hudson NY, is an artistic innovator in the expanding field of ceramics. In this work, “Pot, P. Line” from 2016, she sets a ceramic vessel within a framework of pine timbers. The pot is streaked with pink spray paint, a gesture that could be read as a graffiti-style tag, but also as a knowing reference back to Famille Rose ceramics, the Chinese porcelain with a blushy glaze that captivated 17th and 18th century Europe. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson .
.
.
.
.
#PIApink #pink #unthinkpink #nicolecherubini #ceramicsintheexpandedfield #spraypaint #famillerose #graffiti #ceramics #glaze #craft #clay #keramik #keramikk #krukmakeri # سيراميك #potsinaction #design #pottery #art #sculpture

In the late 1980s, the company Artus Magnus invited nineteen prominent artists to collaborate with established decorative arts manufacturers. The best-known result was this tureen and cover, entitled “Madame de Pompadour/Nee poisson,” by conceptual photographer Cindy Sherman, made in collaboration with the Ancienne Manufacture Royale de Limoges. Part of a 21-piece set, the tureen is based on a historical example commissioned by Madame de Pompadour, mistress of Louis XV. For the self-portrait that adorns the piece, Sherman says, "I wasn’t really trying to copy any picture of Madame de Pompadour, but to look like someone like Madame de Pompadour." As a ground color, rococo pink was the obvious choice. This example is in the collection of the @cooperhewitt. - @unthinkpink aka @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson #PIApink
#pink #unthinkpink #cindysherman #madamedepompadour #rococo #tureen #selfportrait #postmodern #limoges #ArtusMagnus #ceramics #porcelain #glaze #craft #clay #keramik #keramikk #krukmakeri #سيراميك #potsinaction #frenchdecorativearts #design #pottery #18thcentury #RosePompadour

#Repost @unthinkpink
・・・
We're guest-hosting @potsinaction this week! Thanks for having us, @ayumihorie 🙌🏻
"Hotshot curators, Sarah Archer @sarcherize and Glenn Adamson @glenn_adamson are here as @unthinkpink to demystify the color pink in ceramics! Historically it’s been a technically elusive color, yet despite the fact that pink is easy to come by now, it continues to be used with great consideration given its loaded past. Sarah Archer is Philadelphia-based writer and critic, frequent contributor to @Hyperallergic, and the author of @MidcenturyChristmas. Glenn Adamson is a critic and curator based in New York City. He is currently Senior Scholar at the Yale Center for British Art (@yalebritishart) and Editor at Large for The Magazine Antiques (@antiquesmag). -@ayumihorie #PIAhostayumihorie

They write: "Welcome to #PIApink, a series of posts from our new Instagram collaboration @unthinkpink. We’ll be looking at uses of the color pink in ceramics, considering it from the technical, decorative and political points of view. We kick off the series with Dame Lucie Rie (1902-1995), who was born and trained at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Vienna, and introduced a new language of modernist restraint to British ceramics when she emigrated there in 1938. Decades later, Rie was still exploring new directions. In the 1970s she worked primarily in a pastel palette of soft tones, like the pink and turquoise seen in this vessel, which she combined with bronzes and blacks that she had been using for some time. She commented that ‘the pink comes from the chemist,’ meaning that she bought it as a ready-made pigment.” - @sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson
#LucieRie

@Unthinkpink is guest-hosting @potsinaction this week! Thanks for having us, @ayumihorie 🙌🏻
"Hotshot curators, Sarah Archer @sarcherize and Glenn Adamson @glenn_adamson are here as @unthinkpink to demystify the color pink in ceramics! Historically it’s been a technically elusive color, yet despite the fact that pink is easy to come by now, it continues to be used with great consideration given its loaded past. Sarah Archer is Philadelphia-based writer and critic, frequent contributor to @Hyperallergic, and the author of @MidcenturyChristmas. Glenn Adamson is a critic and curator based in New York City. He is currently Senior Scholar at the Yale Center for British Art (@yalebritishart) and Editor at Large for The Magazine Antiques (@antiquesmag). -@ayumihorie #PIAhostayumihorie

They write: "Welcome to #PIApink, a series of posts from our new Instagram collaboration @unthinkpink. We’ll be looking at uses of the color pink in ceramics, considering it from the technical, decorative and political points of view. We kick off the series with Dame Lucie Rie (1902-1995), who was born and trained at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Vienna, and introduced a new language of modernist restraint to British ceramics when she emigrated there in 1938. Decades later, Rie was still exploring new directions. In the 1970s she worked primarily in a pastel palette of soft tones, like the pink and turquoise seen in this vessel, which she combined with bronzes and blacks that she had been using for some time. She commented that ‘the pink comes from the chemist,’ meaning that she bought it as a ready-made pigment.” This piece was shown at the Museum of Contemporary Craft's exhibition "75 For 75 Years" in 2012, curated by @namitapdx. 📸 by Dan Kvitka. -@sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson
#LucieRie

We're guest-hosting @potsinaction this week! Thanks for having us, @ayumihorie 🙌🏻
"Hotshot curators, Sarah Archer @sarcherize and Glenn Adamson @glenn_adamson are here as @unthinkpink to demystify the color pink in ceramics! Historically it’s been a technically elusive color, yet despite the fact that pink is easy to come by now, it continues to be used with great consideration given its loaded past. Sarah Archer is Philadelphia-based writer and critic, frequent contributor to @Hyperallergic, and the author of @MidcenturyChristmas. Glenn Adamson is a critic and curator based in New York City. He is currently Senior Scholar at the Yale Center for British Art (@yalebritishart) and Editor at Large for The Magazine Antiques (@antiquesmag). -@ayumihorie #PIAhostayumihorie

They write: "Welcome to #PIApink, a series of posts from our new Instagram collaboration @unthinkpink. We’ll be looking at uses of the color pink in ceramics, considering it from the technical, decorative and political points of view. We kick off the series with Dame Lucie Rie (1902-1995), who was born and trained at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Vienna, and introduced a new language of modernist restraint to British ceramics when she emigrated there in 1938. Decades later, Rie was still exploring new directions. In the 1970s she worked primarily in a pastel palette of soft tones, like the pink and turquoise seen in this vessel, which she combined with bronzes and blacks that she had been using for some time. She commented that ‘the pink comes from the chemist,’ meaning that she bought it as a ready-made pigment.” This piece was shown at the Museum of Contemporary Craft's exhibition "75 For 75 Years" in 2012, curated by @namitapdx. 📸 by Dan Kvitka. -@sarcherize and @glenn_adamson #PIAguesthostSarahArcher #PIAguesthostGlennAdamson
#LucieRie

Most Popular Instagram Hashtags