#GeorgiaIndians

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Repost from @johnnieaborigine. During the 1700s, more Indians were exported to the Caribbean from Carolina, than African slaves were imported into Carolina. Most people are unaware that Indigenous Americans were made slaves by the Spanish, as soon as the Spanish arrived in Carolina, and then later by English colonists in South Carolina during the late 17th-early 18th centuries. The practice grew out of the continual warfare between tribes. One Indian tribe would make war on another Indian tribe and then sell the prisoners-of-war to the English. The English, aware of tribe-to-tribe hostilities and antipathies, encouraged the warfare. They employed the ancient principle of "Divide And Conquer." They played one tribe against the other. The English would enter into treaty alliances with "friendly" Indians, and then, using their combined strength, defeat a rival tribe and sell the male prisoners-of-war off to the sugar plantations in the Carribean. The Carolina slave traders would usually sell the Indian women and children to Virginia, Maryland, and New England, but they also kept many Indian women and children for their own South Carolina plantations. After the "friendly" tribe had outlived its usefulness, the South Carolineans then recruited a new "friendly" tribe of Indians to make war upon their formerly "friendly" Indian allies. If a indian tribe didn’t want to become slavetraders and take part in slavery, that indigenous tribe became enslaved and extinct as a tribe afterwards. #AboriginalAtlanta #georgiaindians #yamasseeseminole #aboriginalcaribbean #aboriginalhaitians #TheTruthAboutSlaveryInAmerica #genocidereclassifications #aboriginalcarolina

Repost By johnnieaborigine: During the 1700s, more Indians were exported to the Caribbean from Carolina, than African slaves were imported into Carolina. Most people are unaware that Indigenous Americans were made slaves by the Spanish, as soon as the Spanish arrived in Carolina, and then later by English colonists in South Carolina during the late 17th-early 18th centuries. The practice grew out of the continual warfare between tribes. One Indian tribe would make war on another Indian tribe and then sell the prisoners-of-war to the English. The English, aware of tribe-to-tribe hostilities and antipathies, encouraged the warfare. They employed the ancient principle of "Divide And Conquer." They played one tribe against the other. The English would enter into treaty alliances with "friendly" Indians, and then, using their combined strength, defeat a rival tribe and sell the male prisoners-of-war off to the sugar plantations in the Carribean. The Carolina slave traders would usually sell the Indian women and children to Virginia, Maryland, and New England, but they also kept many Indian women and children for their own South Carolina plantations. After the "friendly" tribe had outlived its usefulness, the South Carolineans then recruited a new "friendly" tribe of Indians to make war upon their formerly "friendly" Indian allies. If a indian tribe didn’t want to become slavetraders and take part in slavery, that indigenous tribe became enslaved and extinct as a tribe afterwards. #AboriginalAtlanta #georgiaindians #yamasseeseminole #aboriginalcaribbean #aboriginalhaitians #TheTruthAboutSlaveryInAmerica #genocidereclassifications #aboriginalcarolina

Repost from @johnnieaborigine - The original Cherokee Nation, who called themselves Ani-yun-wiya, from 1794–1907 was an autonomous, tribal government in North America recognized from 1794 to 1907. It shouldn’t be confused with what is known in the 21st century also as the Cherokee Nation. It consisted of the #Aniyunwiya/Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ —pronounced Tsalagi or Cha-la-gee) people of western North Carolina and southeastern U.S., those who relocated voluntarily from the southeastern United States to the Indian Territory (circa 1820 —known as the "Old Settlers"); those who were forced by the U.S. to relocate (through the Indian Removal Act) by way of the Trail of Tears(1830s); “Cherokee Freedmen;” and descendants of the Natchez, the Delaware (Lenape) and the Shawnee peoples who sought refuge within Ani-yun-wiya. At the end of the Cherokee–American wars(1794), Little Turkey was recognized as "Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation" by all the towns. At that time, Cherokee tribes were in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Overhill area that was to become part of the state of Tennessee. The breakaway Chickamauga band (or Lower Cherokee), under chief Dragging Canoe (Tsiyugunsini, 1738–1792), had retreated to & now inhabited an area that would be the northern area of the future state of Alabama. George Washington sought to "civilize" the southeastern American Indians, thru programs overseen by US Indian Agent Benjamin Hawkins. Facilitated by the destruction of many Indian towns during the American Revolutionary War, U.S. land agents convinced many Indigenous Americans to abandon their historic communal-land tenure and settle on isolated farmsteads. Succeeding Little Turkey as Principal Chief were Black Fox (1801–1811) and Pathkiller(1811–1827), both former warriors of Dragging Canoe. "The separation", a phrase which the Cherokee used to describe the period after 1776 when the Chickamauga had removed themselves from the other tribes which were in close proximity to the Anglo settlements, officially ended at the 1809 reunification council. #aboriginalatlanta #georgiaindians #aboriginalgenealogyworkshop #OriginalAniyunwiya #originaldefinitionofAmerican

Regrann from @johnnieaborigine - The original Cherokee Nation, who called themselves Ani-yun-wiya, from 1794–1907 was an autonomous, tribal government in North America recognized from 1794 to 1907. It shouldn’t be confused with what is known in the 21st century also as the Cherokee Nation. It consisted of the #Aniyunwiya/Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ —pronounced Tsalagi or Cha-la-gee) people of western North Carolina and southeastern U.S., those who relocated voluntarily from the southeastern United States to the Indian Territory (circa 1820 —known as the "Old Settlers"); those who were forced by the U.S. to relocate (through the Indian Removal Act) by way of the Trail of Tears(1830s); “Cherokee Freedmen;” and descendants of the Natchez, the Delaware (Lenape) and the Shawnee peoples who sought refuge within Ani-yun-wiya. At the end of the Cherokee–American wars(1794), Little Turkey was recognized as "Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation" by all the towns. At that time, Cherokee tribes were in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Overhill area that was to become part of the state of Tennessee. The breakaway Chickamauga band (or Lower Cherokee), under chief Dragging Canoe (Tsiyugunsini, 1738–1792), had retreated to & now inhabited an area that would be the northern area of the future state of Alabama. George Washington sought to "civilize" the southeastern American Indians, thru programs overseen by US Indian Agent Benjamin Hawkins. Facilitated by the destruction of many Indian towns during the American Revolutionary War, U.S. land agents convinced many Indigenous Americans to abandon their historic communal-land tenure and settle on isolated farmsteads. Succeeding Little Turkey as Principal Chief were Black Fox (1801–1811) and Pathkiller(1811–1827), both former warriors of Dragging Canoe. "The separation", a phrase which the Cherokee used to describe the period after 1776 when the Chickamauga had removed themselves from the other tribes which were in close proximity to the Anglo settlements, officially ended at the 1809 reunification council. #aboriginalatlanta #georgiaindians #aboriginalgenealogyworkshop #OriginalAniyunwiya #originaldefinitionofAmerican #aborigi

#repost @the_ant_people
Gullah Geechee.. the africanized Autochthonous Muskogee Indians.... #aboriginalatlanta #georgiaindians #yamasseeseminole

johnnieaborigineGeorgia, known to the Spaniards as Guale, was a province of Florida during the late 16th century and throughout the entire 17th century. Only few months after the founding of St. Augustine, Menéndez hastened north, and after establishing friendly relations with the Indians of Georgia coast, he left garrisons on St. Catharines Island, known during this period as Guale Island or Santa Catalina de Guale, and on Cumberland Island (San Pedro). When the French Huguenot colony was at Port Royal, South Carolina, in 1562, they heard of a Guale chief called Ouadé and visited him several times for provisions. In 1573 missionary work was resumed by the Franciscans and was successful when in 1597 there was a general insurrection in which most of the missionaries were killed. The governor of Florida shortly afterward burned many of the Guale towns with their granaries, reducing most of the Guale Indians to submission, and by 1601 the rebellion was over. Missionary work was resumed afterward and continued despite insurrections in 1608 and 1645 and attacks by Guale Indians in 1661, 1680, and even earlier. As a result of these attacks, the Guale Indians who didn’t escape inland moved in 1686 to the islands of San Pedro, Santa Maria, and San Juan north of St. Augustine. Guale/#Gullah Indians were constantly warring with the French & Spanish throughout the 1500s-1600s. At the time of the removal, some Guale Indians appear to have gone to South Carolina, and in 1702 a general insurrection of the remainder took place, and they joined their Yamassee kinsmen. Few remained in Florida. All, except who fled to the Creeks, were united after the 1715 Yamassee War and continued to live in St. Augustine until their “extinction.” In 1726 there were two missions near St. Augustine occupied by Indians of the “Iguaja nation” (Guale), but thats supposedly the last heard of “Guale” as an indigenous tribe until they lived with the Yamassee. #aboriginalatlanta#YamasseeSeminole #geechee#georgiaindians #PsyopsHistory#aboriginalcarolina#genocidereclassifications#AfricanDNAtestingHoax#AmericanBonesSpeaks #gullahgeechee#extinctionbyreclassification#aboriginalflorida #abyayala #anahuac

Rp @johnnieaborigine - During the 1700s, more Indians were exported to the Caribbean from Carolina, than African slaves were imported into Carolina. Most people are unaware that Indigenous Americans were made slaves by the Spanish, as soon as the Spanish arrived in Carolina, and then later by English colonists in South Carolina during the late 17th-early 18th centuries. The practice grew out of the continual warfare between tribes. One Indian tribe would make war on another Indian tribe and then sell the prisoners-of-war to the English. The English, aware of tribe-to-tribe hostilities and antipathies, encouraged the warfare. They employed the ancient principle of "Divide And Conquer." They played one tribe against the other. The English would enter into treaty alliances with "friendly" Indians, and then, using their combined strength, defeat a rival tribe and sell the male prisoners-of-war off to the sugar plantations in the Carribean. The Carolina slave traders would usually sell the Indian women and children to Virginia, Maryland, and New England, but they also kept many Indian women and children for their own South Carolina plantations. After the "friendly" tribe had outlived its usefulness, the South Carolineans then recruited a new "friendly" tribe of Indians to make war upon their formerly "friendly" Indian allies. If a indian tribe didn’t want to become slavetraders and take part in slavery, that indigenous tribe became enslaved and extinct as a tribe afterwards. #AboriginalAtlanta #georgiaindians #yamasseeseminole #aboriginalcaribbean #aboriginalhaitians #TheTruthAboutSlaveryInAmerica #genocidereclassifications #aboriginalcarolina - #regrann

Regrann from @johnnieaborigine - During the 1700s, more Indians were exported to the Caribbean from Carolina, than African slaves were imported into Carolina. Most people are unaware that Indigenous Americans were made slaves by the Spanish, as soon as the Spanish arrived in Carolina, and then later by English colonists in South Carolina during the late 17th-early 18th centuries. The practice grew out of the continual warfare between tribes. One Indian tribe would make war on another Indian tribe and then sell the prisoners-of-war to the English. The English, aware of tribe-to-tribe hostilities and antipathies, encouraged the warfare. They employed the ancient principle of "Divide And Conquer." They played one tribe against the other. The English would enter into treaty alliances with "friendly" Indians, and then, using their combined strength, defeat a rival tribe and sell the male prisoners-of-war off to the sugar plantations in the Carribean. The Carolina slave traders would usually sell the Indian women and children to Virginia, Maryland, and New England, but they also kept many Indian women and children for their own South Carolina plantations. After the "friendly" tribe had outlived its usefulness, the South Carolineans then recruited a new "friendly" tribe of Indians to make war upon their formerly "friendly" Indian allies. If a indian tribe didn’t want to become slavetraders and take part in slavery, that indigenous tribe became enslaved and extinct as a tribe afterwards. #AboriginalAtlanta #georgiaindians #yamasseeseminole #aboriginalcaribbean #aboriginalhaitians #TheTruthAboutSlaveryInAmerica #genocidereclassifications #aboriginalcarolina - #regrann

Regrann from @johnnieaborigine - Georgia, known to the Spaniards as Guale, was a province of Florida during the late 16th century and throughout the entire 17th century. Only few months after the founding of St. Augustine, Menéndez hastened north, and after establishing friendly relations with the Indians of Georgia coast, he left garrisons on St. Catharines Island, known during this period as Guale Island or Santa Catalina de Guale, and on Cumberland Island (San Pedro). When the French Huguenot colony was at Port Royal, South Carolina, in 1562, they heard of a Guale chief called Ouadé and visited him several times for provisions. In 1573 missionary work was resumed by the Franciscans and was successful when in 1597 there was a general insurrection in which most of the missionaries were killed. The governor of Florida shortly afterward burned many of the Guale towns with their granaries, reducing most of the Guale Indians to submission, and by 1601 the rebellion was over. Missionary work was resumed afterward and continued despite insurrections in 1608 and 1645 and attacks by Guale Indians in 1661, 1680, and even earlier. As a result of these attacks, the Guale Indians who didn’t escape inland moved in 1686 to the islands of San Pedro, Santa Maria, and San Juan north of St. Augustine. Guale/#Gullah Indians were constantly warring with the French & Spanish throughout the 1500s-1600s. At the time of the removal, some Guale Indians appear to have gone to South Carolina, and in 1702 a general insurrection of the remainder took place, and they joined their Yamassee kinsmen. Few remained in Florida. All, except who fled to the Creeks, were united after the 1715 Yamassee War and continued to live in St. Augustine until their “extinction.” In 1726 there were two missions near St. Augustine occupied by Indians of the “Iguaja nation” (Guale), but thats supposedly the last heard of “Guale” as an indigenous tribe until they lived with the Yamassee. #aboriginalatlanta #YamasseeSeminole #geechee #georgiaindians #PsyopsHistory #aboriginalcarolina #genocidereclassifications #AfricanDNAtestingHoax #AmericanBonesSpeaks #gullahgeechee #extinctionbyreclassification #aboriginalflo

Georgia, known to the Spaniards as Guale, was a province of Florida during the late 16th century and throughout the entire 17th century. Only few months after the founding of St. Augustine, Menéndez hastened north, and after establishing friendly relations with the Indians of Georgia coast, he left garrisons on St. Catharines Island, known during this period as Guale Island or Santa Catalina de Guale, and on Cumberland Island (San Pedro). When the French Huguenot colony was at Port Royal, South Carolina, in 1562, they heard of a Guale chief called Ouadé and visited him several times for provisions. In 1573 missionary work was resumed by the Franciscans and was successful when in 1597 there was a general insurrection in which most of the missionaries were killed. The governor of Florida shortly afterward burned many of the Guale towns with their granaries, reducing most of the Guale Indians to submission, and by 1601 the rebellion was over. Missionary work was resumed afterward and continued despite insurrections in 1608 and 1645 and attacks by Guale Indians in 1661, 1680, and even earlier. As a result of these attacks, the Guale Indians who didn’t escape inland moved in 1686 to the islands of San Pedro, Santa Maria, and San Juan north of St. Augustine. Guale/#Gullah Indians were constantly warring with the French & Spanish throughout the 1500s-1600s. At the time of the removal, some Guale Indians appear to have gone to South Carolina, and in 1702 a general insurrection of the remainder took place, and they joined their Yamassee kinsmen. Few remained in Florida. All, except who fled to the Creeks, were united after the 1715 Yamassee War and continued to live in St. Augustine until their “extinction.” In 1726 there were two missions near St. Augustine occupied by Indians of the “Iguaja nation” (Guale), but thats supposedly the last heard of “Guale” as an indigenous tribe until they lived with the Yamassee. #aboriginalatlanta #YamasseeSeminole #geechee #georgiaindians #PsyopsHistory #aboriginalcarolina #genocidereclassifications #AfricanDNAtestingHoax #AmericanBonesSpeaks #gullahgeechee #extinctionbyreclassification #aboriginalflorida #panafricanismiswhitesupremacy

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