#12thcentury

MOST RECENT

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“War, whoa, lord
What is it good for
Absolutely nothing, listen to me...”
~The Temptations
Songwriters: Barret Strong / Norman Whitfield
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The Battle of Bannockburn (Scottish Gaelic: Blàr Allt nam Bànag or Scottish Gaelic: Blàr Allt a' Bhonnaich) June 24, 1314 was a significant Scottish victory in the First War of Scottish Independence, and a landmark in Scottish history. Built on a volcano, Stirling Castle, a Scots royal fortress occupied by the English, was under siege by the Scottish army. The English king, Edward II, assembled a formidable force to defend the castle. His army was defeated in a pitched battle by a smaller army commanded by the King of Scots, Robert the Bruce. The castle dates from at least early 12th century, but present buildings were mostly built between 1490 and 1600. •••


#stirlingcastle #roberttheBruce #visitscotland #fortress #lovescotland #historic #vacationtime #travellers #12thcentury #scotland #bannockburn #historicscotland #massive #longlongtimeago .
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#optoutside #amazingview #womenwhohike #neverstopexploring #beautiful_world #findyourpassion #lovethemoment #makeitcount #writersofinstagram #outdoorwomen #gratefulheart #wanderwoman #letsgosomewhere #nature_lovers #seetheworld #thetemptations 📷: 7/21/2018

Day 5: Salisbury 🗾 Quick picnic, saw the Magna Carta, and Stone Henge 🗿🗿🗿
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#somuchhistory #cathedral #12thcentury #whoputthatthere #penicosinvadeengland

☄️Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
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Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
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A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
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In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
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Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

☄️Portal decoration, Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
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Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

☄️Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

☄️Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

Scarborough Castle (we're not talking sandcastles) has seen 3000 years of history defending Scarborough, and the country, from incoming invasions. Head up the hill and pay it a visit to learn more about it's rich history.
#tourism #tourist #history #war #travelling #visiting #castle #igtravel #travelingram #instago #soldiers #scarborough #northyork #traveler #culture #medieval #12thcentury #learning #student #studentlife #thingstodo

I've read and re-read the #Cadfael novels so many times. Ellis Peters is one of my favourite authors. They're set in Shropshire in the #12thcentury, and the #bookmark is of an old Shropshire cottage. And could that cup and saucer have been any better a match for the book cover?
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#ellispeters #theleperofsaintgiles #agoodbookandacupoftea #agoodread #whodunnit #bookmark #lesezeichen #marquepage #marcapagina #marcadoresdelivres #cupandsaucer #historynovel #lovetoread #lovereading #bookstagram #bookstagrammer #booklove #igreads #igbooks #bookishescape #bookish #readingforfun #instabooks #goodread #readingaddict #booknerd

Medieval belt details 😊 the rosary and the belt itself are both made me, and the beautiful needle case is made by the very talented @ratworksleather on etsy.
Photo credit: @picturebox_gallery .
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#thenostalgicneedle #medieval #medievalfashion #middleages #medievalreenactment #leatherwork #rosary #medievalrosary #reenactor #12thcentury #normans #bliaut

Where my family is from there is a cool castle. Fun fact: the larger trebuchet projectile in France was found among its fallen walls.

☄️Omen - Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
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Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

Through the door to the past 🚪

The 12th century round tower of St Peter’s Church, Bruisyard. I used my light grey wax pastel to indicate the brickwork/form of the tower. Generally I try to keep it simple with watercolours, but it’s useful with sketches to have some extras like the wax pastel, rather than painting lines which can look a bit heavy, I think. #anglosaxon#mopbrush#roundtower#waxpastel#bruisyard#watercolour#sketchbook#watercolor#suffolk#12thcentury

☄️Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
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Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

☄️Agüero, Huesca, Aragón, Spain
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ⓒ Peter Callas 2018. All Rights Reserved. This image may not be used, reposted or reproduced in any way without prior written permission from the copyright holder.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A “terraficio” (neologism formed from terra, meaning “earth” and -ficio from Latin -ficium “-making”, related to faciō “I make, do”) is a structure built into the earth or using the contours or characteristics of local earth or rock formations. I cannot think of a word for this already in English, and yet it is such a universal constant worldwide in the history of architecture and its vocabulary of forms. Included as elemental terraficios would be the Athenian Acropolis, the ground-excavated temples of Ellora in India and the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, towns like Pitigliano in Italy and Rello in Spain, where houses are built so close to the edge of cliffs that they become a vertiginous part of the precipice. Other examples are Rocca Calascio, Aubeterre-sur-Dronne and the Grottes de Abbaye de Brantôme (for these three see my previous posts).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the case of Agüero (Omen), the whole town, cradled as it is by the base of the mighty conglomerate mass of the Mallos de Agüero, could be called a terraficio. You could speculate that the initial reason for beginning to build an urban environment in this extraordinary location was that it must have been at least partially protective. This territory changed hands again and again between Muslim and Christian forces, and the Mallos outcrop probably seemed impregnable at the time (ironically these days it is a popular rock-climbing venue), leaving only three sides that needed to be protected from invaders or marauders. But there may have been something far more elemental than protection from men at play here: a harnessing of ancient telluric forces.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Text copyright Peter Callas 2018.

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