stevewinterphoto stevewinterphoto

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Steve Winter  NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker. Now touring with @NatGeo Live! Click on link below for tour stops and tix.

@stevewinterphoto
Happy Mothers Day to all!
As I lost my mother so very long ago - I wanted to send out a message of love and hope to those who are orphans like the ones I met, here in an orphanage Haiti. Many were just left at the door of Mother Teresa’s Home for Children in Port-au-Prince. Mothers hoping the child would have food to eat and school to attend.
We can all find mothers and fathers in others who care and give selflessly to children a place in their hearts. But deep inside - some of these kids wish they knew who their mom was and where she is.
Love and Happiness to all. Listen to Al Green

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork
What are you doing to my home?
A wise man once said “where there is life there is hope but the time to act is now.
We are in danger of losing more than one million species to extinction. And we will suffer greatly - as we are part of nature - and everything on the planet is connected.
Nature is perfection.
All of us and especially young people need to "take back the planet" from the ones who care only for the short term,
and do not believe in science. I always wondered about deniers - when they were young and in school - did their parents tell
them not to worry about passing science class as it was untrue anyway? I rather doubt it.
Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provide us with half of the world’s wildlife and 2/3’s of the plant life on earth – 80% of the biodiversity is found in forests. Forests pump the oxygen we need to live. Each tree produces enough oxygen for 12 people. They cool the planet and provide us with fresh water as they help make it rain! Forests, grasslands and mountains provide 75% of fresh water. Our planet is all connected and we are part of it all – we need to all work towards a future where we protect 50% of our planet – so we have a future for generations to come. Take a walk in the woods and hear the symphony of nature - the birds and insects or walk upon the beach, as nature heals. I have HOPE as without it - what is left? Believe. VOTE
@africaparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @thephotosociety

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto

A “Flamboyance” of nesting Pink Flamingos with their chicks in Rio Lagartos Biosphere Reserve on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.
Rio Lagartos was created to save such a charismatic, graceful and beautiful species - the flamingo.
This wetland, mangrove and forest area is protected because of the flamingo - so everything ABOVE the water - like the jaguars, iguanas and birds and BELOW the water - the mangroves, fish, rays, dolphins, and nesting sea turtles are all protected because of this amazing bird!!
#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images from my work with @natgeo and Thanks!!

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork
A flock of Quelea with a elephant behind in Zakouma NP in Chad.
What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork
Male after a small breakfast snack
Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too”
Poisonings and poaching are the main threats to lions across their East African range. Most lion populations in East, Central and West Africa are declining so the time to act is now. Their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other body parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @AfricanParksNetwork

#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and Thanks!! @thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork #lionstrong #livingwithlions @leonardodicapriofdn

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

And now for something different, Sunrise over Bagan

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provide us with half of the world’s wildlife and 2/3’s of the plant life on earth – 80% of the biodiversity is found in forests. Forests pump the oxygen we need to live. They cool the planet and provide us with fresh water as they help make it rain! Forests, grasslands and mountains provide 75% of fresh water. Our planet is all connected and we are part of it all – we need to all work towards a future where we protect 50% of our planet – so we have a future for generations to come. @africaparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @thephotosociety @natgeofineart @natgeoimagecollection

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provide us with half of the world’s wildlife and 2/3’s of the plant life on earth – 80% of the biodiversity is found in forests. Forests pump the oxygen we need to live. They cool the planet and provide us with fresh water as they help make it rain! Forests, grasslands and mountains provide 75% of fresh water. Our planet is all connected and we are part of it all – we need to all work towards a future where we protect 50% of our planet – so we have a future for generations to come. @africaparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @thephotosociety @natgeofineart @natgeoimagecollection

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto shot on iPhone
HAPPY EARTH DAY - tomorrow!!!
We as humans are apart of nature - the natural world keeps us alive - giving us the air we breathe, the water we drink - the land to grow the food we eat.
Here we are filming at a waterhole in Zakouma in Chad. Alex and I are thinking about getting to the hide - but that would be a foolish move with the herd of Ele’s!! What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork @alexbraczkowski

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Zakouma NP Ranger talking to a village council - African Parks looks at the animals, habitat and people that live within as a true ecosystem. Every individual part is vital to the whole ecosystem and success of the park. Read below

What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto -
Lion cub walking through the grasses to the pride.
Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too”
Poisonings and poaching are the main threats to lions across their East African range. Most lion populations in East, Central and West Africa are declining so the time to act is now. Their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other body parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @AfricanParksNetwork

#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and Thanks!! @thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork #lionstrong #livingwithlions @leonardodicapriofdn

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Zebra family rubbing noses.
This animal behavior is so similar in many ways to us as humans! Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, we need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not.

@thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork

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