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Stanford University  Stanford is one of the world's leading research and teaching institutions. Official Instagram feed by University Communications.

Fearing aftershocks from the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, many students camped in tents outside dormitories, including Encina Hall. The quake, which hit the Bay Area at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, caused more than $2 million of damage at Stanford and killed two people. Among other structures, the new library and gym were destroyed, and Memorial Church and the Memorial Arch at the front of the Quad were badly damaged.
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The earthquake sent the statue of geologist Louis Agassiz plunging into the concrete below. But, when the statue was extricated from the ground the only damage was to its nose, which was refastened.
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Stanford students and faculty members organized to help victims, particularly in San Francisco, where fires were destroying much of the city. Based at "Camp Stanford," volunteers helped distribute food and clothing, while Memorial Church's Rev. Charles Gardner served as cook in a sidewalk kitchen. Meanwhile, meetings took place in Palo Alto and on campus to distribute information, request volunteers, and recruit homeowners to welcome refugees fleeing the fires and devastation. 📷: Stanford University Archives, Robert Moran #TBT

Swimming on its own, a tiny sea monkey wisps through water, causing only a ripple. But a swarm of millions or billions of zooplankton can have an outsized effect on their environment, @StanfordEng's John Dabiri and colleagues have found. By day the small organisms live hundreds of meters below the ocean surface, but as they rise at night to feed, they create a downward flow of water likely strong enough to stir their surroundings and alter the ocean's nutrient distribution, possibly even influencing climate models.
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Zooplankton swim in response to light, so Dabiri used lasers to control their migration and study their fluid mechanics. The flows were powerful enough to mix the tank’s salt gradient irreversibly. Dabiri says the findings might reflect an important coupling between organisms and the ocean. "The work suggests that the effects of our pollution, of over-fishing, of the acidification of the ocean, might have more severe consequences than we currently appreciate," he says.
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🎥: @kurthickman
🎵: Morningview by deeB/ Chillhop Records

In the '60s, @judy.chicago was told she couldn’t be both a woman and an artist. In the '70s, she developed a feminist art curriculum. In the '80s, the New York Times denounced her piece The Dinner Party as “failed” art, and in 2002, commended it. The Dinner Party has been a fixture at the @brooklynmuseum for 16 years, and Chicago continues to use art to push for social change and advocate for women’s right to engage in the highest level of art production.
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Chicago will be in conversation with Marci Kwon, assistant professor of art history, for the annual Burt and Deedee McMurtry Lecture at the Bing Concert Hall on April 23 at 6:30 p.m. The lecture is open to the public; no tickets are required and seating is on a first come, first served basis.
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“Judy Chicago with Car Hood” Photo ©Donald Woodman/Artist Rights Society (ARS) NY
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@anderson.collection.stanford @stanfordlive @stanfordarts

Throwback to the Winter Quarter "Meet the Makers" event, which features student projects created in Stanford's Product Realization Lab. Their work ranges from innovations in health and education devices to agricultural tools, consumer products, sports equipment, fine jewelry, and beyond. #latergram Photos by @hollyhernandezphoto

There's a unique arboretum in the basement of Green Library, where university archivists are preserving Stanford Trees of the past. The Tree is the mascot of the Stanford Band, and each year its human inhabitant creates his or her own costume. When an event like Reunion Homecoming rolls around, a Tree's human can visit the library and bring them back to life at any time by checking them out, just like a book.

“I listened to his heartbeat. I was the first in the family to hear it. It was a miracle,” says freshman Jaylen Jasper (@jaylenjasper) about his younger brother’s successful heart transplant. While Jaylen, the top high school volleyball recruit in 2017, was heading to class and volleyball practice, his 14-year-old brother Jarren was put on life support after a routine heart surgery had gone awry. As Jarren was waiting for a heart donor, Jaylen was struggling with guilt for leaving home, adjusting to a new school, and fearing for his brother’s precarious health. Now, after Jarren’s successful heart transplant, Jaylen moves forward driven by support his family, including daily conversations with his brother. “It’s not often that you get a chance to appreciate your family when they are here,” he says, “But, thankfully, I’ve been able to do that. I’ve felt it. Every day.”
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📷: Mike Rasay/ISIphotos.com

It's opening night for Ram's Head Theatrical Society's "Chicago," which will razzle dazzle audiences in Memorial Auditorium through April 21. The all-student production involves 82 creative and technical team members, plus student-built lighting displays, rotating video walls, and two sets of costumes. 📷: @l.a.cicero

#TBT to the first world record set by a Stanford athlete, track and field star Norman Dole, '04, pictured here in the high jump. Using a carved spruce pole, Dole set a world record for the pole vault, clearing 12 feet, 1 and 8/25 inches at the Stanford-Cal Big Meet in April 1904. 📷: Stanford University Archives

“I call what I do conjure art. My work is rooted in social justice and ritual, and so basically I utilize spiritual ritual in non-traditional ways to think about ways that we can change the vibration of an issue, as opposed to just educate people on an issue through performance.
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“I’m a contemporary choreographer but my movement draws from different dance forms from the African Diaspora. In classes I teach, we’ve focused on Afro-Cuban and Afro-Brazilian dances that have informed contemporary dance, and that evoke the orisha divinities that come from the Yoruba tradition in Nigeria. Orisha are based in the belief that every aspect of nature is representative of a certain divinity. Each orisha has an in-balance and an out-of-balance state and is connected to nature - not only our physical nature and environment, but our human nature.
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“At Stanford, I direct the Committee on Black Performing Arts (CBPA) and am an artist-in-residence in @StanfordTAPS. CBPA was formed in 1968 by students demanding racial justice in response to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.
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“Today at CBPA, we really want to create room for experimentation and encourage artists to explore outside of definition and forms, and to be in a process where they can show work that’s in progress. We also want students to be mentored by artists – including alumni artists – and to have residencies and performances and actually engage. One of the things that underpins CBPA and its partner, @IDAStanford, moving forward is doing work and thinking from an anti-racist perspective: understanding the construct of race and being a part of the undoing of racist structures.” – Amara Tabor-Smith (@amarat.smith) @stanfordarts
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🎥: @kurthickman

Rolling around what looks like Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, these student-built robots have one mission: find animals in need of rescue. To do this, they must first map their surroundings — roads, trees, etc. — and also tell the difference between, say, an angry bear and a lost kitten.
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As part of a robotic autonomy class, students build the different components of the autonomy software and then integrate and deploy them into their robots.
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A functioning whole autonomous vehicle is much harder to achieve than the sum of its components, says Benoit Landry, a graduate student in aeronautics and astronautics and teaching assistant for the class. “So that’s really something that we’re trying to emphasize: How do you piece all of these complicated parts together to make a whole that works?” he says.
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🎥: @kurthickman

“It is consumer demand that is warping journalism into providing an echo of the prejudices that people already carry, rather than being an objective accounting of reality which apparently is less marketable these days. I think we need to get back to a demand on the part of the consumer for objective facts. They’re not as much fun as opinion, but they’re a lot healthier for a democracy,” said Ted Koppel, MA ’62, during the “Real And Fake News” @hooverinstitution Cardinal Conversation, which was moderated by Michael McFaul and also featured Washington Post columnist Anne Applebaum and Jessica Lessin, founder of The Information. After the talk, Koppel spent time in conversation with students and attendees.
Photos by @hollyhernandezphoto

#SLACback, 1963. Construction of the linac beam housing at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Research at the Stanford-operated lab, which is located just a few miles west of campus, has produced four Nobel Prizes.#fbf

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