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rockymtnwolf rockymtnwolf

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Rocky Mountain Wolf Project  RMWP aims to improve the public understanding of gray wolf behavior, ecology, and options for re-establishing the species in CO.

http://bit.ly/2AIQHeP

Myth: Wolves represent a threat to the livestock industry.
Truth: Wolves strongly prefer native prey, and it's the atypical wolf that kills livestock. Wolf depredations on livestock are very uncommon and represent less than 1% of livestock produced in places like western Colorado.
Click on this link to learn from #Rancher Duke Phillips: http://bit.ly/2EJfvti

In anticipation of our @natgeoyourshot assignment launching on February 26, we’ll be debunking myths about the big, bad wolf — and telling the truth about the real wolf!
Myth: Wolves kill for sport.
Truth: Wolves were brutally exterminated from the continental US based on the myth of a ravenous, cruel wolf that exercises its predatory lust on a whim and at will. But reliable science tells us that most hunts fail and starvation and injuries are common for wolves — and without them nature's balance is disturbed and ecosystems suffer.
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Photo by Doug Smith, NPS

Gray wolves roamed the snow-capped peaks, rim rock canyons, and primeval forests of Western Colorado for centuries, bringing balance to the ecosystems that surrounded them. Their elusive nature kept them from heavily populated areas, and humans and gray wolves to coexisted peacefully for generations. It's time #RestoreTheWolf. Learn how you can help by following our @natgeoyourshot assignment launching February 26 and learn more about the real wolf → http://bit.ly/2BI6heq

We’ve got some exciting stuff in the pipeline for later this week! Sign up at RockyMountainWolfProject.org to be the first to know.
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Photo by @grizzlycreekfilms

Wolves employ a variety of non-vocal forms of communication to express and maintain their status — including using their posture, facial expression and ear and tail positioning.
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Info from @living_w_wolves / photos by @international_wolf_center

All elements of an ecosystem — from plants to songbirds to other predators — stand to benefit from a wolf reintroduction. In Yellowstone, left over wolf kills (carrion) often provide food for Yellowstone’s other predators, like grizzlies, ravens, foxes, bird of prey and golden eagles.
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Video by Krisztina Gayler

Look closely 💕Prolactin is a hormone that induces parental behavior in mammals. In wolf packs, prolactin peaks when puppies are born and runs high in both males and females — everyone digs dens and any female can produce milk. The Lone Wolf, the Big, Bad Wolf... it’s time we tell the story of the Real Wolf.
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Photo by Matt Metz, Agate Creek Pack

Can you feel the love tonight? 🎼💘 A pack is led by an alpha male and female – a duo bonded by a long-lasting, affectionate relationship. The alphas breed once a year and are mainly monogamous, although a widowed mate may breed with another wolf. It’s time we tell the truth about wolves — and restore the #MissingHowl to Colorado!
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Photo by Dan Stahler, Druid Pack in YNP

This week, we celebrate the ones we love 💕 Like us, wolves are highly social animals that depend on their family — or pack — for survival. They work together to gather food, take care of the young and nurse the injured — and, within packs, wolves develop deep bonds and display affection for their mates.
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Photo by Doug Smith, Yellowstone National Park

There’s a chorus we sing here in Colorado... but something’s gone missing 🐺

@grizzlycreekfilms spoke to the team at the @jacksonholewild about “Chorus of Colorado.” Asked about the challenges of making this film, director Thomas Winston said: “The issue of wolves in Colorado can be contentious and polarizing, our goal with this short film was leverage the aspects of the state that all Coloradan’s love, from the natural beauty to the Broncos at Mile High. Then we ponder the questions: What’s missing from the nearly perfect picture?”

Wolves have many names: Lobo in Spanish, Loup in French, Lupo in Italian, Varg in Swedish, Ulv in Norwegian... In Colorado, we can add another: native. Let’s restore the #MissingHowl to our state.
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Photo by @liannarose, used with permission

Can you imagine hearing the #MissingHowl in Colorado again? Wolves howl to communicate with other packs, coordinate social activities and advertise their territory (NPS). In a forest, a howl can be heard as far as 11km (6.6 mi) away and nearly 16km (9.6 mi) away in open areas.
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Photo by @grizzlycreekfilms

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