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Pulitzer Center  Journalism and education for the public good. This week documentary photographer & storyteller @pabloa.photo takes over our account.

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta with collaboration of @engajamundo supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells 5 stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Jair Bolsonaro’s first 100 days have shown how damaging his presidency can be to very many people in Brazil. Communities in the Amazon region are continuously challenged by aggressive extractivist activities carried out by mining, logging, and agribusiness. The portrait of 5 young leaders from different communities in the Lower Tapajós River region tells a story of dignity, pride, courage and determination to resist. They lead us into their brave journeys to defend their territory and the rainforest standing up and confronting the attacks on the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples and the environment currently unfolding in the Brazilian Amazon.

Caption:
Dani (21) lives in a protected National Forest (FLONA) surrounded by menacing soya bean fields. But the protection that the FLONA so far grants her community does not protect its people from a conservative and repressed society. After years of struggle and personal suffering, Dani has been able to publicly declare her homosexuality. Being recognized as such is what now gives her an untameable force, which she projects not only in the fight against homophobia, racism and sexual abuse, but also against the surrounding threat of predatory agro-business.
Photo: Pablo Albarenga

#pulitzercenter #storytelling #documentaryphotography #pabloalbarenga #democraciaabierta #everydaylatinamerica #climatechange #amazonrainforest #rainforestjournalismfund

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta, in collaboration with @engajamundo, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells 5 stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Jair Bolsonaro’s first 100 days have shown how damaging his presidency can be to very many people in Brazil. Communities in the Amazon region are continuously challenged by aggressive extractivist activities carried out by mining, logging, and agribusiness. The portrait of 5 young leaders from different communities in the Lower Tapajós River region tells a story of dignity, pride, courage and determination to resist. They lead us into their brave journeys to defend their territory and the rainforest standing up and confronting the attacks on the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples and the environment currently unfolding in the Brazilian Amazon.

Caption:
Ednei (20) is a young Arapiun community leader who has recently joined the land guard team at the Indigenous Territory of Maró (TI Maró) in the Maró River. The team carries out regular surveillance beats across the rainforest, watching for illegal loggers and poachers stealing from their sacred land. TI Maró covers some 42,000 hectares of untouched, pristine rainforest. Under the strong leadership of chief Dadá Borarí, the community has been fiercely fighting to defend themselves from illegal loggers who extract wood from their ancestral land. Since their territory was officially recognized, they have been keeping a close watch. Right: 26 huge precious logs captured by the TI Maró team in one of their beats, now lying by the road track. Measuring 1 to 2 meters in diameter, the 26 logs rot to fertilize the land. Left: Ednei is portrayed lying on the road tracks left by logger trucks driving close to the borders of the Indigenous Maró Territory. Photo: Pablo Albarenga

#pulitzercenter #storytelling #documentaryphotography #pabloalbarenga #democraciaabierta #everydaylatinamerica #climatechange #amazonrainforest #rainforestjournalismfund

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta, in collaboration with @engajamundo, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells 5 stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Jair Bolsonaro’s first 100 days have shown how damaging his presidency can be to very many people in Brazil. Communities in the Amazon region are continuously challenged by aggressive extractivist activities carried out by mining, logging, and agribusiness. The portrait of 5 young leaders from different communities in the Lower Tapajós River region tells a story of dignity, pride, courage and determination to resist. They lead us into their brave journeys to defend their territory and the rainforest standing up and confronting the attacks on the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples and the environment currently unfolding in the Brazilian Amazon.

Caption:
Joane (20) is an indigenous woman who leads a group of youngsters in defending the rainforest from plastic contamination in her village, Suruacá, in the Extractivist Reserve of the Tapajós-Arapiuns, in the Lower Brazilian Amazon. Plastic pollution, which is killing the river and rainforest fauna, gets to Suruacá through different means: the packaging of food and beverages they buy to complement their shrinking traditional food chain, waste thrown from passing boats, and from the emerging tourist resort across the river. As waste management is nonexistent, Suruacá villagers burn plastic waste on a daily basis. The fires get often out of control and burn the surrounding rainforest. Joane is asking authorities to implement a waste collection system and promotes recycling in her village using organic waste to produce natural gas and compost to fertilize their orchards and lower their dependence on food coming in plastic wrappings from town. Right: Joane lying on the sand, by the Tapajos River shore. Left: Plastic waste reaches the river beach, close to Suruacá village. Photo: Pablo Albarenga. •
#pulitzercenter #storytelling

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta, in collaboration with @engajamundo, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells 5 stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Jair Bolsonaro’s first 100 days have shown how damaging his presidency can be to very many people in Brazil. Communities in the Amazon region are continuously challenged by aggressive extractivist activities carried out by mining, logging, and agribusiness. The portrait of 5 young leaders from different communities in the Lower Tapajós River region tells a story of dignity, pride, courage and determination to resist. They lead us into their brave journeys to defend their territory and the rainforest standing up and confronting the attacks on the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples and the environment currently unfolding in the Brazilian Amazon.

Caption:
Tupi (29) has become a rainforest defender. Embarked on her journey in rebuilding as a woman , she became the first woman in her village to assert that she had been sexually abused and had suffered violence. That was the first step to address the issue of gender violence in her village, San Francisco, in the Extractivist Reserve of the Tapajós-Aparapiuns. She has encouraged other indigenous women to tell their stories and fight gender violence embedded in a very patriarchal society. Tupi leads a women’s support group and has joined the Tapajós Suraras (warriors) group of indigenous women who defend their identity and the surrounding rainforest territory through activism and traditional music. Right: Tupi in her home village. Left: This is the territory Tupi defends: her body and indigenous identity.
Photo: Pablo Albarenga.

#pulitzercenter #storytelling #documentaryphotography #pabloalbarenga #democraciaabierta #everydaylatinamerica #climatechange #amazonrainforest #rainforestjournalismfund

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta, in collaboration with @engajamundo, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells 5 stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Jair Bolsonaro’s first 100 days have shown how damaging his presidency can be to very many people in Brazil. Communities in the Amazon region are continuously challenged by aggressive extractivist activities carried out by mining, logging, and agribusiness. The portrait of 5 young leaders from different communities in the Lower Tapajós River region tells a story of dignity, pride, courage and determination to resist. They lead us into their brave journeys to defend their territory and the rainforest standing up and confronting the attacks on the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples and the environment currently unfolding in the Brazilian Amazon.

Caption:
Drica (29) lives in Tapagem, a Quilombo up the Trombetas River, in the Brazilian Amazon. The territories known as Quilombos are home to descendants of escaped African slaves. Those who managed to escape, traveled deep inside the rainforest for protection. They have been established there since the 19th century. Drica is the first woman to have been elected as Quilombola Territory Coordinator and she represents the five communities living there. The first challenge these Quilombos face is loggers eager to strike deals with the community. A second challenge is a Bauxite mine down the river: it has been building dams taking no safety measures whatsoever which are putting the entire Trombetas River at risk. But for Drica, the greatest challenge of all is a huge hydroelectric dam project which has already been green-lighted by the government and which will not only destroy the river environment but also displace the communities from their homeland. Right: Drica portrayed lying in her ancestral land. Left: Aerial view of the Rio Norte Bauxite Mine next to the Quilombola territory, on the Trombetas River. Photo: Pablo Albarenga.

Pablo Albarenga @pabloa.photo here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. •
This week I will share Rainforest Defenders, a project by @demoabierta, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund, Pulitzer Center, which tells five stories of young leaders defending their territories in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

Today you will see the trailer, filmed, edited and directed by Pablo Albarenga with interviews and texts by Francesc Badia.
#pulitzercenter #storytelling ##documentaryphotography #pabloalbarenga #democraciaabierta #francescbadia #everydaylatinamerica #climatechange #amazonrainforest #rainforestjournalismfund

Jonathan Torgovnik @torgovnik here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. This week I will share images and reflections from my DISCLOSURE project in Rwanda. Rwanda’s children born of rape are coming of age — against the odds. At 24, these young men and women are reflecting on what it has meant to be born of such awful circumstances.
Valerie and her son Robert (2006 & 2018). “My mother discloses to me that I was born as a result of genocide rape, after my aunties the sisters of my mothers would call me Hutu, and said I was bad. She told me how I was born as a child of a killer and the man who raped her was a Hutu, and that she had no role in having me with this man but it was forced and that this man was not good, he killed many people, but my mother loved me as who I am, as her child. I broke down after she told me this and I cried and was traumatized. After she disclosed to me, I hated that man that was my father. I don't think I would ever forgive him. One of the effects of knowing I was born from genocide rape are psychological, I felt I was unwanted. Another effect is that I have no family, I only have my mother. The fact that my mother disclosed to me that I was born from genocide rape made me increase my love for her” — Robert. #jonathantorgovnik #genocide #pulitzercenterforcrisisreporting #pulitzercenter #photojournalism #photojournalist #disclosure #portraitphotography #documentaryphotography #foundationrwanda #rwanda

Jonathan Torgovnik @torgovnik here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. This week I will share images and reflections from my DISCLOSURE project in Rwanda. Rwanda’s children born of rape are coming of age — against the odds. At 24, these young men and women are reflecting on what it has meant to be born of such awful circumstances and to have been isolated as a result. They are sharing the challenges they face as they become young adults, in a judgmental society that adheres to traditions and rules that make it difficult for them to avoid discrimination and harassment

Thomas — ”I used to feel bad knowing that my father is a killer and rapist, and I used to feel stigma about being born from a person that killed people. We all want to be identified as good people, and being identified as the son of a bad person used to hurt me very much, but most recently I decided that I consider him as never existed, like he is not my father.” #jonathantorgovnik #genocide #pulitzercenterforcrisisreporting #pulitzercenter #photojournalism #photojournalist #disclosure #portraitphotography #documentaryphotography #foundationrwanda #rwanda

Jonathan Torgovnik @torgovnik here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. This week I will share images and reflections from my DISCLOSURE project in Rwanda. On the occasion of the 25th commemoration of the Rwandan genocide against Tutsi, I returned to Rwanda several times to revisit some of the families I met 12 years before when I began a project documenting the stories of women who were raped during the 1994 genocide, and the children born of those horrific encounters. The mothers have now disclosed to their children the circumstances of how they were conceived, and the children are speaking for the first time, as young adults, reflecting on the years of growing up while being called ‘children of the killers’. In this image: Alice daughter of Justine: "I always asked my mother about my father and about how I was born, but she would avoid telling me. One day she called me and said “today I wanted to tell you about who your father is because I was raped during the genocide and as a result you were born”. After she told me this I felt sad but I pretended to be strong because I didn't want her to feel more depressed, I was sad, at the same time I was happy to know the truth. I do not feel the need to know who my father is. The fact is, my father was among the killers and did things worst than animals can do. I would not want to identify with him, I don't think he is a normal human being, I prefer not identifying with him”. #pulitzercenter #jonathantorgovnik #documentaryphotography #photojournalism #genocide #rwandangenocide #trauma #survivor #testimony #disclosure #rwanda

Jonathan Torgovnik @torgovnik here, taking over the @pulitzercenter instagram feed. This week I will share images and reflections from my DISCLOSURE project in Rwanda. On the occasion of the 25th commemoration of the Rwandan genocide against Tutsi, I returned to Rwanda several times to revisit some of the families I met 12 years before when I began a project documenting the stories of women who were raped during the 1994 genocide, and the children born of those horrific encounters. The mothers have now disclosed to their children the circumstances of how they were conceived, and the children are speaking for the first time, as young adults, reflecting on the years of growing up while being called ‘children of the killers’. Alice and her mother Justine, Kayonza, Rwanda “The fact is, my father was among the killers and did things worst than animals can do. I would not want to identify with him, I don’t think he is a normal human being... The effects on me are that I feel that my father contributed to the horrible things that happened in Rwanda and I don’t feel good about having been born from someone like that. Life has improved and still getting better, I have completed secondary school and started university and I am a strong young woman. I used to be so sad. Now I feel free.” —Alice #pulitzercenter #jonathantorgovnik #documentaryphotography #photojournalism #genocide #rwandangenocide #trauma #survivor #testimony #disclosure #rwanda

Raghunath Manwar examines an X-ray of one of several workers who has been diagnosed with asbestosis in Ahmedabad, India. Raghunath is the secretary of an NGO, the Occupational Health and Safety Association, that assists employees affected by asbestos from a power-generating company and a cement factory.

@louiepalu on a @pulitzercenter IG takeover sharing this work from my 15-year study on #asbestos now published by @yoffypress as the book A FIELD GUIDE TO ASBESTOS on the effects of the carcinogenic material on humans and the environment. Thousands of people die a year from asbestos related disease. #mesothelioma #photojournalism #mining #cancer #carcinogen

Workers outside an auto parts plant in New Delhi, India, that uses asbestos in the manufacture of car components. These workers wear no safety equipment while working and have no access to any equipment to prevent the inhalation of dust and asbestos.

@louiepalu on a @pulitzercenter IG takeover sharing this work from my 15-year study on #asbestos now published by @yoffypress as the book A FIELD GUIDE TO ASBESTOS on the effects of the carcinogenic material on humans and the environment. Thousands of people die a year from asbestos related disease. #mesothelioma #photojournalism #mining #cancer #carcinogen

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