pascalbaudar pascalbaudar

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Pascal Baudar  Author, wild food research, traditional food preservation methods, culinary alchemist, entomophagy. Naturalist - Los Angeles.

http://www.urbanoutdoorskills.com/

Project of the day - fermenting some of my wild radish pods with red cabbage and wasabi.

These days I'm a bit obsessed at experimenting with spices and condiments in fermentation. There is nothing wrong with your regular sauerkraut or kimchi but I think there is so much more flavors that can explored, mostly with wild edibles.

My best result so far was with my wild radish pods fermented with regular cabbage and my own homemade mustard with foraged seeds. I'm totally in love with the flavors. My second favorite was to ferment with curry powder.
I currently have a fermentation going on with soy sauce instead of salt, tasted it today and I have no idea if it will be good, it could go both ways. I'll find out in a week or so.

But encouraged by my mustard experiment, I have the feeling that wasabi may work, unless the wasabi flavors change too during the fermentation process.

Will see... not sure what color my pods will end up too.

Wild radish is a super invasive plant in Southern California so finding ways to turn them into a gourmet condiment is a good thing. #fermentation #wildfermentation #experimentalcuisine #condiments #wildfoodlove #chefs #wasabi #radish

Another breakfast featuring local flavors.

Feral figs, yogurt, preserved local blackberry in syrup, ripe white elderberries, manzanita powder (taste like apple), California juniper sugar and pine pollen.
Local passion fruit seeds (crunchy and sugary). We're kind of lucky around the Los Angeles area as we can find tons of figs in the environment.
They're not really native, originally planted but birds love eating them then they fly and poop, spreading seeds in the local forests. Same goes with the local passion fruits (Passiflora caerulea) which is another introduced fruit.

These days, I'm thinking about how it could be interesting to create a cuisine that feature a local terroir (all the edible plants that can exist in an environment - non-native, invasive, natives, etc...) but would put emphasis on non-native plants and then use native ones, which can be planted, as just flavor accents. Basically create a cuisine that could help the environment.
I think that could be an interesting concept worth exploring. I have more questions than answers at this point but i think we are at a stage when we must take a look at how we can live more harmoniously with our surrounding.
Time to eat... #wildfoodlove #chefs #eatwell #sustainable #localcuisine #foodforthoughts #chefsoninstagram #feedfeed @thefeedfeed #latimesfood #eaterla #herbalism #preserves

And what if you break down the rules and your fermented beverage is made with malted grains, molasses, local raw honey, insect honeydew and wild berries juices?

What is your yeast comes from the local mountains and desert and not classified as a beer, wine or champagne yeast?
And what if you fermented your "mead", country wine and wild beer separately and combined them for a final fermentation, blending all the elements into a unique drink?

Add to the final fermentation stems, plants and barks. Is is now a fermented infusion?
Or maybe you could you then call it a cocktail?
Why do we need labels like meads, beers and wines? The more I delve into the subject of wild fermentation, the more I realize the ancestral fermented drinks didn't need any labels. People used to make their sacred boozy concoctions with what nature was offering to them. The plants, barks, leaves and berries would talk to them through their effects - dreamy for mugwort and healing for willow bark.

Primal fermentation! Without labels, you can't tax it, you can't forbid it, you can't make laws prohibiting it (like distillation). There is a tremendous freedom in going back to wild yeasts and what nature is offering us!
In the photo:
Aged mugwort mead (5 years), elderberry wine (2015), fresh horehound beer, added currant molasses, new yeast from local juniper berries, yarrow full grains beer. Blend re-fermented and mugwort, sagebrush and black sage stems, willow bark added to the final fermentation.

All coming from my new wild beer garden in the Angeles Forest (private property)

#beer #mead #wine #fermentation #booze #herbalism #herbs #brewing #wildfermentation #yeast #wildfoodlove #wildcrafting #mixology #mixologyart #cocktails #chefs #wilddrinks #bartenders #cookingschool #culinaryresearch8

Breakfast...Acorn/Chickpeas hummus (maybe 10% acorn flour), pinyon pine nuts, black nightshade berries, pequin peppers, feral fermented olives, epazote, Thai chili peppers, mealworms (my own farm), local crickets, habanero infused salt.

Spicy and yummy!

#entomophagy #wildfoodlove #eatbugs #eatwild #chefs #acorn #hummus #wildcrafting #yummybugs #breakfast #foraging

Sometimes simple is awesome and good for the environment. Fingerling potatoes sauteed with good butter, sweet white clover, homemade sea salt (from sea water) and peppercorn.

All the flavors comes from the sweet white clover (Melilotus albus), a plant native to Europe and Asia which has become invasive and outcompete native plant species especially near water streams.
If you eat it fresh, the plant is too bitter. The secret is to use it as a flavor additive. The taste is hard to describe: Hint of vanilla, grassy, touch of cinnamon, it's truly fascinating how the flavors come out when you cook with it. It's also great to place inside a fish (trout for example). For this dish, I simply steamed the potatoes for around 15 minutes then placed them in a pan with good butter and around 3small sprigs of sweet white clover. Added the salt and pepper. You can add a touch of garlic too.

Sauteed everything for 4-5 minutes, add a couple of fresh sprigs one minute before you serve. Remove the potatoes, place the sticks inside and add some of the cooked (crunchy) sweet white clover. Add a bit of peppercorn if you want.

Simple...awesome. #foraging #wildfoodlove #herbalism #chefs #sustainability #wildedibles #chefsoninstagram #artofplating #feedfeed @thefeedfeed #barfood

Spending the morning expanding my native plants garden - white sage, black sage, yerba santa, wild currant, coffee berries and much more.
This year my wild beer plants garden really took off and is looking fantastic, I want to expand it a bit to include aromatic plants for teas, infusions and spices.

#wildcrafting #beergarden #spices #infusions #herbalism #planting #nativeplamtsgarden

Friend of the day - beautiful encounter during my hike. We chilled for a few minutes together and he posed for a few photos. Not aggressive at all. Rattlesnakes really don't want to bite you, keep your distance, show them the proper respect and be nice to them. This one was probably 5 feet long. #rattlesnake #beauty #nature #friend

Sourdough bread baked in my solar oven - True Flavors of Southern California.

A few months ago I posted pictures of taking my sourdough with me into the mountains, deserts and forest to gather the local yeast and flavors. The result is fantastic!

I've kept that sourdough going for over 6 months now, feeding him every week.
I kneaded this bread yesterday, pretty much 50% sourdough and 50% regular flour and let it rise overnight. In the morning it was double in size. I took that dough, folded it a few times with a small amount of new dough, made it into a bread ball and within an hour it started rising again.

The bread was then placed into a pot and into the solar oven. The temperature reached 350 degrees! The bread was cooked for around 75 minutes.
Fantastic for the environment too - just plain solar power.
The flavors are not overwhelming at all, hints of cheese and a bit sour. It's an amazing sourdough - super happy!
Now I just need some good butter and cheese :) #bread #tartine #fermentation #wildfermentation #baking #wildyeast #wildbread #foraging #breadmaking #solarenergy #solar

Smoky, Spicy WaterKraut - Fermented forest watercress with cabbage, homemade mustard from locally foraged seeds (Black mustard) and smoked mesquite wood chips.
Again super good for the environment as you remove some invasive plants to turn them into gourmet food (black mustard and non-native watercress). To make a quart:

3/4 large cabbage shredded
2 1/2 cups chopped watercress
3 tablespoons homemade or store bought mustard (stone-ground)
1 chopped hot jalapeno (with seeds)
Handful of mesquite wood chips

Ended up with 1 1/2 pounds so I used 1 1/2 teaspoon of pure sea salt.

Method:

First mix the cabbage, watercress and the salt, massage forcefully for 5 minutes to extract the juice then set aside 10-15 minutes

While this was going on, I had the mesquite chips being roasted in the oven on a metal tray covered with aluminum paper for maybe 15 minutes. I finished the roasting of the chips with a kitchen torch.
Now, add around 2-3 tablespoons of stone ground mustard to your mixed cabbage/watercress mix again with clean hands.

In a quart jar, place your smoked mesquite wood chips at the bottom of the jar, then a layer composed of the sliced jalapeno and a couple of cabbage leaves. You basically don't want your wood chips to start floating inside your waterkraut, you just want the flavor.

Now place your shredded juicy mix (cabbage, watercress, mustard) in the jar on top of the wood chips and jalapeno. With clean hands, push down to make sure everything is covered with the juice/brine

Add a folder large leaf of cabbage above everything and a pasteurized stone on top of the leaf. The goal is to keep everything under the brine.

If necessary, you may need to add some brine so it covers the ingredients inside ( I had to add 3/4 cup of brine). If so, make a brine composed of 1 tablespoon of salt for 2 cups of water.
Pour the brine inside the jar until it reaches the stone.

Close the lid but not too tight so that fermentation gases can escape.

3 times a day, using clean fingers or a clean spoon, push down the ingredients as the bubbles will have a tendency the push the ingredients up the jar. #wildfermentation #canning #ferments #wildcood

Forest beer in progress. For my wild beer workshop this SUNDAY! (Los Angeles)

A good representation of the season and what nature is providing us. Mugwort (0.3 oz), a few willow leaves, sagebrush stems, turkey tail mushrooms from last winter, bigberry manzanita (skin taste like lemons), sumac berries, fermented limes, 2 lemons.
Sugar sources: Piloncillo sugar (pure cane sugar), forest honey from my friend's hive in the forest, insect honeydew (Lerps sugar). 1 pound of the cane sugar and 1/4 pound of the honey and honeydew.

Wild Yeast from local elderberries.

Pretty much all ingredients came from my wild "beer" garden on a private property in the Angeles Forest.
Boil everything for 30 minutes, cool it down and add the yeast.
Fermenting it for 10 days (bottle with airlock) then bottling it for 3 weeks before enjoying. Flavor profile is between a beer and a cider.

I have a wild beer workshop this Sunday and another one the week after that in OJAI. So if you live in Los Angeles, check my schedule. Link in the profile.

#fermentation #beer #brewing #wildfermentation #wildfoodlove #wildbeers #feedfeed @thefeedfeed #foodart #localflavors #mixology #bartenders #cocktails #history #primirivebrewing #gruits #nohops #apothecary

Squids marinated for a day in lime juice, elderberry wine, pickled wild seeds, sweet white clover, garlic, shallots, foraged watercress, homemade salt, pepper and about to go into the oven for roasting.

475 degrees for 12 minutes, this is going to be good.
I'll add a bit of bread crumbs and fresh watercress to the cooked marinade and stuff it back inside the squid.

Good for the environmet _ foraged invasives plants and native plants from my native plants garden.

Work in progress for my wild food tasting class at the end of each month. Exploring the flavors of Southern California. #cooking #wildfoodlove #squids #seafood #experiments #cooking #feedfeed @thefeedfeed #chefs

Eat the invasives! Fermented wild radish pods and leaves, curly dock (Rumex crispus), perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) with homemade mustard from local black mustard seeds.

Taste fantastic; tangy, spicy, rich flavors and this is another example of how foraging can help the environment by using local non-natives and invasive plants and turn them into gourmet food.

Ingredients: (to make a quart jar - around 1 1/4 pounds)

1 large cabbage
2 cups radish pods
1 cup shredded leaves (wild radish, pepperweed and curly dock)
2 tablespoons stone-ground mustard (foraged or not).
1 teaspoon ground peppercorn
3/4 tablespoon sea salt

My mustard was made with mugwort beer vinegar, elderberry wine, local black mustard seeds and sea salt.

Method:
First mix the cabbage, radish pods, leaves watercress and the salt, massage forcefully for 5 minutes to extract the juice then set aside.

Add around 2-3 tablespoons of stone ground mustard

Place everything in your jar and fill the jar leaving 1 inch headspace.

Add a folder large leaf of cabbage above everything and a pasteurized stone on top of the leaf. The goal is to keep everything under the brine.

If necessary, you may need to add some brine so it covers the ingredients inside ( I had to add 3/4 cup of brine). If so, make a brine composed of 1 tablespoon of salt for 2 cups of water.
Pour the brine inside the jar until it reaches the stone.

Close the lid but not too tight so that fermentation gases can escape.

3 times a day, using clean fingers or a clean spoon, push down the ingredients as the bubbles will have a tendency the push the ingredients up the jar. It’s a good idea to place the jar on a plate in case some brine escape during the fermentation process.
Ferment for 7-10 days at room temperature then place in the fridge. #fermentation #helpnature #wildfermentation #wildfoodlove #foraging #mustard #food #pickling #pickles #chefs #foodpreservation #preserves

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