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NPR  100 Top Colleges Vow To Enroll More Low-Income Students

As more schools band together to commit to recruiting and graduating 50,000 more low-income students, four college presidents discuss what it will take to get there. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @viv.shih | Vivian Shih for NPR)

Scholar and activist David Scobey believes the focus shouldn't be "quick-and-dirty" paths to a degree for adult learners, but deep learning experiences and strong support.⠀

Since 2014, Scobey has been listening to adult learners to find out their aspirations. And what they've told him is that they tend to thrive on the same kinds of high-quality learning opportunities that all college students do: small seminars, capstone projects, internships, a broad liberal arts curriculum.⠀

He argues teaching adults this way might be the most practical approach, and that adult learners are actually less expensive to serve than traditional students. (Credit: @jeanniephan | Jeannie Phan for NPR)

In his new book, ‘A Higher Loyalty,’ Former FBI Director James Comey describes President Trump as unfit for the nation's highest office, but stops short of concluding there's a strong case against the president for obstructing justice. There's some evidence of it, though, Comey said, citing his surprise dismissal in May 2017 after the president asked him to go easy on an investigation of former national security adviser Michael Flynn. (Credit: @elias.williams | Elias Williams for NPR)

This is Ed Hoffman, from Pennsylvania. This is his 20th Boston.
Ed runs because it makes him feel good: “I could have the worst day of work. I’d go out for even a mile-and-a-half run and it’s all good, everything is good.” We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with @wbur in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

(from left) Brian Cronin, Sal Mastasi, Aly Schneider, and Boyd Carrington are running together. Schneider has non-verbal autism and runs with guides who help him navigate the course. (Elizabeth Gillis/WBUR)

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with @wbur in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

This is Debbie Cook’s first Boston Marathon. She’s originally from Basingstoke, England and has run three world major marathons in the past: New York, London, and Berlin. When thinking about the victims of the bombings five years ago, she gets very emotional. In a way, she says, she’s running for them. (Credit: Elizabeth Gillis/@WBUR)

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with local radio stations in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

Runners cross the finish line during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon. It marks the 50th consecutive year the race has been held on a Monday. Meredith Nierman/WGBH

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing in collaboration with local radio stations in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

Mohamed Hamza, a Bronx-based cellphone shop owner, is a U.S. citizen from Yemen. His 3-year-old son is also a U.S. citizen, but Hamza's wife and another child are not — and have not received visas to travel to the U.S. Hamza's wife and the two children are stuck for now in Djibouti.⠀

Trying to flee the war in Yemen, some U.S. passport holders are stuck in Djibouti due to slow immigration processes and the Trump administration's ban on travel from countries including Yemen. (Credit: @hellobunni | Melissa Bunni Elian for NPR)

There can be unintended consequences when doctors and med students volunteer to improve local health care in developing countries. A recent position paper offers up ethical guidance. (Credit: @itschrisnickels | Chris Nickels for NPR)

In 1968, Congress passed the Fair Housing Act that made it illegal to discriminate in housing. Gene Demby of NPR’s Code Switch explains why neighborhoods are still so segregated. To watch the full video, visit npr.org/livingapart (Credit: NPR)

American Muslim college students in Ohio (front row: left to right) Halimah Muhammad (in brown hijab), Fatima Shendy, Zaina Salem, Ruba Abu-Amara, (back row: left to right) Arkann Al-Khalilee (in gray hijab), Nora Hmeidan and Lama Abu-Amara appear in an image that was featured in Uhuru, a Kent State University magazine in an issue on identity and race.⠀

Fashion designers. Community activists. Parents. Converts. High school students facing down bullies. Podcasters creating their own space to exhale.⠀

The newest generation of American Muslims is a mosaic, one of the most racially and ethnically diverse faith groups in the country. At a time when all religions are struggling to keep youth engaged, Islam is growing in the U.S., according to the Pew Research Center.⠀

Many American Muslims found themselves on the defensive after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. But this generation says it is tired of being expected to apologize. Instead, young Muslims are determined to take control of their own stories. And they are creating fresh paths for the estimated 3.45 million Muslims in America. (Credit: @_eslahlahlah | Eslah Attar for NPR)

The Finger Lakes Community Health staff in New York State, near the Canadian border, noticed that farm workers were struggling to get to clinics. So the staff decided to bring check-ups to them by home visits and through video calls. (Credit: @christinaillos | Christina Chung for NPR)

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