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Each week, the Design Museum in London announces a theme for #FontSunday, and enthusiasts search for interesting examples to share on Twitter. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR)

President Trump's status with the Conservative Political Action Conference has gone from "it's complicated" to a full-on committed relationship.

That turnaround was to be expected, given that the former reality TV star and billionaire businessman pulled off an unlikely upset last November that finally gave attendees at CPAC what they had been salivating over for more than a decade — control of the White House, Congress and a new conservative justice nominated to the Supreme Court to boot.

But to do that, attendees had to be willing to embrace Trump's brand of populist conservatism that hasn't always jibed with the more libertarian strain that's usually in command at CPACs of yesteryear.

The last person who did embody the group's perfect conservative ideal was one that Trump's team was quick to draw a comparisons to throughout the week — President Ronald Reagan. White House chief of staff Reince Priebus made sure the allusion to the 40th president was clear. "Some of the core principles of President Trump are very similar to those of Ronald Reagan," the former Republican National Committee chairman told CPAC attendees on Thursday. "When you look at peace through strength and building up the military ... Peace through strength, deregulation. You think about the economy, the economic boom that was created. And some of it is going to take a little time, I mean, to get the jobs back; to get more money in people's pockets. Those things are going to happen." But Trump's proclamation on Friday that "the era of empty talk is over" belies the struggles he's had in his first month in office — from blowback over the hurried implementation of his controversial travel ban to the anger Republican members of Congress are facing back home at recess town halls this week without a replacement plan if Obamacare is repealed.

Above: Scenes from CPAC 2017 at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Maryland. Follow the link in our bio for more photos and the full story. (Credit: @mariancaa | Marian Carrasquero/NPR)

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

The North Dakota Joint Information Center reports that 46 people were arrested on Thursday. Others left the camp voluntarily throughout the day, according to a news release from the center. The arrests were nonviolent, though in several instances small groups of protestors stood peacefully in front of police lines until they were detained.

Follow the link in our bio for the full story and more photos. (Credit: @angusmordant | Angus Mordant for NPR)

A protestor leaves the Oceti Sakowin camp to stand in front of the police lines on Highway 1806 near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Wednesday afternoon. Local law enforcement officers arrested some people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Most protesters had left earlier. ⠀

In December, the Obama administration announced it would not allow construction to go forward until the Army Corps conducted a full environmental review of the route. It was a win for the protest movement.⠀

The Corps officially began the review process in January, opening up the pipeline route plan to public comments, but that process ground to a halt when President Trump signed an executive memorandum directing the Corps to expedite the permitting consideration.⠀

The Corps subsequently approved the river crossing on Feb. 7, and suspended its environmental review and construction resumed.⠀

Follow the link in our bio for the full story and more photos. (Credit: @angusmordant | Angus Mordant for NPR)

Local law enforcement officers have arrested people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The governor of North Dakota had set Wednesday as the evacuation deadline for the largest protest camp, which is on a flat area north of the Cannonball River. He cited flooding concerns.⠀

Protesters supporting members of the Standing Rock Sioux, many of whom believe the pipeline's route under a section of the Missouri River known as Lake Oahe will endanger drinking water, have been living on the land for six months or more. They have erected shelters and organized supply systems for food and water, even as winter brought freezing temperatures and feet of snow.⠀

As the 3 p.m. ET deadline approached, some demonstrators prayed while others took down some shelters and set fire to things they were not carrying out. Rain falling on law enforcement and demonstrators turned to fat snowflakes.⠀

For more coverage, follow the link in our bio. (Credit: @angusmordant | Angus Mordant for NPR)

The world of infectious diseases has more than a few words and phrases you might want to know more about. Like vector, which we define as any living creature that can pass an infection to another living creature. Humans are technically vectors, but the term is more commonly applied to nonhuman organisms. Follow the link in our bio for the full list of terms. (Credit: Katherine Du/NPR)

A study tracking depression rates among U.S. teens from 2005 to 2014 finds an increase — especially among girls. A steady diet of harsh judgments from social media may play a role, researchers say. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @nicolexu_ | Nicole Xu for NPR)

Joseph Funn (center) experienced homelessness for almost 20 years, until he moved into an apartment in Baltimore in December. Last winter, Funn was living outside and trudging through deep snow for days. His left foot got so swollen, he could hardly walk. Funn visited a Health Care for the Homeless clinic and was treated for frostbite. The clinic staff also signed him up for Medicaid, the government's health insurance program for the poor and disabled. ⠀
Like many people who are homeless, Funn was uninsured. But under the Affordable Care Act, Maryland is one of 31 states and the District of Columbia that expanded Medicaid to cover nondisabled childless adults.⠀

Everyone expects Congress to change the Affordable Care Act, but no one knows exactly how. The uncertainty has one group of people, the homeless, especially concerned. Many received health coverage for the first time under Obamacare; now they're worried it will disappear. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @mererizzo | Meredith Rizzo/NPR)

As the cost of college grows, research shows that so does the number of hungry and homeless students at colleges and universities across the country. Still, many say the problem is invisible to the public. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @thelajohnson | LA Johnson/NPR)

The hours are long as a pig farmer. The work is hard, and dirty. But Ryan Kress, of Independence, Iowa loves what he does. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @elissanad | Elissa Nadworny/NPR) #OurLand

No snark or anti-commercialism rantings here, just a dose of simple sweetness on Valentine's Day. Readers shared stories and photos — and an NPR illustrator re-created a couple of valentines that live on only in memories.⠀

Renae Quinn’s favorite valentine ever was from her late husband on the Valentine's Day before they were married. She sent us this story:⠀

He gave me a box and lined up in the box were a drawing of an eye, a paper heart on a spring that popped up when I opened the box, a pink foam letter U, a chocolate-covered strawberry, and a baggie full of dirt from the garden in front of our apartment.⠀

I was mystified. I mean I got the "I love you so very" part clearly enough, but the dirt? I said, "You love me so very dirty?" I didn't care for that! He kept saying, "No, think about it."⠀

But all I could come up with was, "I love you so very dirt."⠀

He finally told me, "MULCH! It's mulch!"⠀

So it said, "I love you so very much." Duh.⠀

Follow the link in our bio for more valentines. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) #valentines

No snark or anti-commercialism rantings here, just a dose of simple sweetness on Valentine's Day. Readers shared stories and photos — and an NPR illustrator re-created a couple of valentines that live on only in memories. ⠀

Francha Menhard’s favorite valentine came from a second-grader in her English class. "I was teaching them similes to describe things. 'You are as quiet as a mouse,' 'You are tall as the ceiling,' etc.," Menhard said. ⠀
On Valentine's Day, Menhard's wild and crazy student, J.R., gave her a heart cut out of plain white paper and he wrote: "You are as beautiful as Wonder Woman. You are as fun as clowns. You are as smart as God. Love JR.”⠀

Menhard kept the valentine on her fridge until the sun completely bleached it, some 14 years later.⠀

Follow the link in our bio for more valentines. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) #valentines