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NPR  Black And Gray ... And Brown: A Tattoo Style's Chicano Roots

Chuey Quintanar (@chueyquintanar) is tattooing a portrait of his client's first born daughter. A style of tattooing called "black and gray realism" has its roots in East Los Angeles' Chicano culture. It moved from penal institutions, to the barrios, to high-end tattoo shops around the world. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR)

A team of contractors works on the renovation of a home in Phoenix. A decade after the U.S. housing crisis, some old habits are back, including house flipping, which is at an 11-year high. New research shows borrowers with good credit like flippers, and not subprime borrowers, were mainly responsible for the crash. Is another bust coming? Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @caitlin_oh | Caitlin O’Hara for NPR)

Najai McKenzei Robinson, 16, (center) and Nancy Carvalajo, 16, (right) participate in a national walkout for gun safety in downtown Austin, Texas, to the steps of the State Capitol on Friday. Some 2,600 school walkouts are planned across the country. (Credit: @cperezgabriel | Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT) #nationalwalkoutday

Students walk out of Churchill High School in San Antonio, Texas on Friday. At schools across the country today, students are walking out of class when the clock strikes 10 a.m. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence. (Credit: Camille Phillips/Texas Public Radio) #nationalwalkoutday

In the womb, you got oxygen from your mother through the umbilical cord. But birds and reptiles are isolated from their mothers — so how do they get oxygen? Why don’t they suffocate? Skunk Bear uses the magic of animation to take you inside a developing chicken egg and show you the delicate system that makes it all possible. 🐣 (Credit: Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman/NPR)

As more schools band together to commit to recruiting and graduating 50,000 more low-income students, four college presidents discuss what it will take to get there. (Credit: @viv.shih | Vivian Shih for NPR)

Scholar and activist David Scobey believes the focus shouldn't be "quick-and-dirty" paths to a degree for adult learners, but deep learning experiences and strong support.⠀

Since 2014, Scobey has been listening to adult learners to find out their aspirations. And what they've told him is that they tend to thrive on the same kinds of high-quality learning opportunities that all college students do: small seminars, capstone projects, internships, a broad liberal arts curriculum.⠀

He argues teaching adults this way might be the most practical approach, and that adult learners are actually less expensive to serve than traditional students. (Credit: @jeanniephan | Jeannie Phan for NPR)

In his new book, ‘A Higher Loyalty,’ Former FBI Director James Comey describes President Trump as unfit for the nation's highest office, but stops short of concluding there's a strong case against the president for obstructing justice. There's some evidence of it, though, Comey said, citing his surprise dismissal in May 2017 after the president asked him to go easy on an investigation of former national security adviser Michael Flynn. (Credit: @elias.williams | Elias Williams for NPR)

This is Ed Hoffman, from Pennsylvania. This is his 20th Boston.
Ed runs because it makes him feel good: “I could have the worst day of work. I’d go out for even a mile-and-a-half run and it’s all good, everything is good.” We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with @wbur in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

(from left) Brian Cronin, Sal Mastasi, Aly Schneider, and Boyd Carrington are running together. Schneider has non-verbal autism and runs with guides who help him navigate the course. (Elizabeth Gillis/WBUR)

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with @wbur in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

This is Debbie Cook’s first Boston Marathon. She’s originally from Basingstoke, England and has run three world major marathons in the past: New York, London, and Berlin. When thinking about the victims of the bombings five years ago, she gets very emotional. In a way, she says, she’s running for them. (Credit: Elizabeth Gillis/@WBUR)

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing, in collaboration with local radio stations in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

Runners cross the finish line during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon. It marks the 50th consecutive year the race has been held on a Monday. Meredith Nierman/WGBH

We’re doing a ‘Why Do You Run’ special in remembrance of the Boston Marathon bombing in collaboration with local radio stations in Boston. Tell us in the comments: why do you run? #bostonmarathon

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