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The Nature Conservancy  Worldwide conservation organization protecting lands and waters.

A Marine Conservation ranger holds a hawksbill turtle egg in hopes to guide it towards the ocean when hatched (swipe to see the little hatchling and a peek into their journey back to the ocean). Have you ever participated in something like this before?
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#WorldTurtleDay 🐢has a special place in our hearts as we celebrate the work being done in the Arnavon Islands for these remarkable species. Through research, TNC found that most nesting turtles spend their entire nesting season within the Arnavons' protected boundaries, and the majority of these turtles return to the Great Barrier Reef to forage in highly protected waters, moving from one sanctuary to another. This highlights the need for an interconnected approach to establishing marine sanctuaries, which can also help to conserve shared resources.
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This initiative to save nesting hawksbill turtles is a window into the future of conservation—one that combines community involvement and pride for local lands, waters, and wildlife with broader conservation goals, scientific research, and emerging technologies. Together, we can secure a brighter future for these majestic creatures. .
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Photos by: @timcalver

Today is #BiodiversityDay. 🐠🐜🦋🌱
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Let’s look at just one family of species you probably never knew you needed – that of the dung beetle. These little insects are the sanitation workers of the animal kingdom, always up to their elbows in poo. Yet what they do for the planet is enormously important. In cattle pastures, they’ve been known to bury more than 80 percent of the dung pats. At the same time, they loosen and nourish the soil, improve its ability to hold water, prevent the plants under the cow pies from dying, and keep the fly population down, all of which keep pastures and cattle healthy and growing. They keep air pollution down, as well – researchers have found that some dung beetles reduce the methane emitted by cow pies by 40 percent.
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Scientists are finding that many species of dung beetle are endangered. In Colombian cattle pastures they are slowing their soil-enriching activities because, as tree cover has disappeared, they must avoid dehydration in the relentless sun.
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As their population diminishes, the manure stays above ground and hardens, and the pasture becomes a barren, smelly, GHG-emitting and fly-infested mess. The health of the soil drops, and so does the productive value of the farmland, leaving ranchers looking to convert more forest to rangeland, thereby further diminishing the biodiversity that keeps their land productive and their agricultural GHG emissions from increasing. See a pattern here?
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The decline of biodiversity is an urgent environmental problem facing humanity. Why? Because once a species goes extinct, then it’s game over. There is no going back.
And while most people understand that we are losing the world’s tigers, rhinos and elephants, there is something just as disturbing going on among the millions of different types of plants, animals and microorganisms that together make Earth a livable place for us humans.
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Words by: Ginya Truitt Nakata

What's the buzz 🐝 about World Bee Day? Well, for one, did you know that bees have been producing honey for *at least* 150 million years? Un-bee-lievable, right?
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In honor of #WorldBeeDay, we're partnering with @comvitausa this month to keep these essential little guys (and queens) around. From now until May 31, post your favorite bee, honey or flower video or photo. Use #WeCanBEEHeroes in the caption and tell us why these pollinators matter to you. For every use of the hashtag, Comvita will donate $2 up to 10K.
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And - make sure to tune into our stories today for more bee facts!
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📸: Bridget Besaw

An overhead view of zebras in the Phinda Game Reserve, Kwa Zulu-Natai, South Africa.
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Photographer statement: After volunteering in South Africa for months, I couldn't imagine life without the African Bush. Every second there was something new to experience and see. It was magic."
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We love a good magical sight in nature–which is your favorite? ✨
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📸: Nadia Sheikh

Heads up!! The votes have been tallied and our #WinForEarth winners are in featured in our story today.
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Thank you to all who participated in making our planet a little greener throughout April. A win for the natural world is a win for everyone! 💯
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📸: Andrew Peacock

Did you give your mom a bear-y tight hug today? 💕#happymothersday
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📸:Kathleen Patricia Turner

The cerulean warbler weighs only 8-10 grams, yet each year it migrates to the Great Lakes all the way from South America.
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Happy #WorldMigratoryBirdDay! What’s your favorite migratory bird?
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📸: Marja Bakermans

“In a recent paper, my colleagues and I assembled tree cover maps for 97 US cities, housing 59 million people, and analyzed how much current urban tree cover reduces summer air temperatures and associated heat-related health impacts and electricity consumption. In these 97 cities, trees prevent around 300 heat-related deaths per year. If this rate holds true for all Americans in cities, trees are preventing around 1,200 heat-related deaths annually.
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In other words, there would be about twice as many deaths every year due to heat waves if our urban forests weren’t there to protect us. Our results also show that urban forests also help prevent more than 100,000 doctor visits for heat-related symptoms. Urban tree canopy and its ability to cool the air will get more important in the coming decades. Climate change will continue to make our summers hotter, and our heat waves more intense and more frequent. Maintaining and expanding tree cover will be an increasingly important investment to protect public health, one part of how cities can adapt to a hotter world.”
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Words by: Rob McDonald
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📸: Devan King

A spotted emerald glass frog in Oiapoque, in the northern Brazilian Amazon.
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Yesterday, the Intergovernmental Panel for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, or IPBES, released its first report detailing past biodiversity losses and prospects for people and nature. The average abundance of native species in most major land-based habitats has fallen by at least 20%, mostly since 1900. More than 40% of amphibian species, almost 33% of reef-forming corals and more than a third of all marine mammals are threatened. The report adds that one million species could be extinct within decades. It's time we find a more sustainable path. TNC scientists have run the numbers: this is possible if society makes big changes within the next decade.
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Our natural world is on life support. Wondering what you can do to stop biodiversity loss and defend earth species? Link in bio to help.
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📸: Fabio Maffei

What adventure will you get lost in today?
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📸: Tanner Latham
#nature #getoutside

Around the world, bees are the most ecologically important creatures when it comes to pollination. Roughly 87 percent of all flowering plants require pollination, and the vast majority are pollinated by bees.
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Because so much of our food depends on pollination, bees are fundamental to the production of our crops. And as a side note, they're non-aggressive and uninterested in people. So the next time you see one flying around, remember to bee kind. 😉🐝
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This month, we're partnering with @comvitausa to help protect these essential pollinators. Post your favorite bee, flower or honey photo/video, use the hashtag #WeCanBEEHeroes and Comvita will donate $2, up to $10K!
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📸: Greg Tucker

Margaret Lou-Vike (Kia village, Isabel Province) plants a coconut tree in the Solomon Islands. Margaret is the mother of five and a key member of the Mothers Union, a group of Kia women who have worked with the Conservancy to raise conservation awareness. The group successfully protested logging operations in the traditionally owned Barora Faa forest.
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Women across the Pacific are taking action to protect their lands and waters, maintain their cultural traditions, and securing their future and their children’s future in the face of climate change. TNC supports and amplifies their efforts as workers and leaders in their communities around the world.
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📸: Bridget Besaw

#internationalworkersday #pacificislands #conservation #womeninconservation

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