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NASA Goddard  The official Instagram account of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Twitter: @NASAGoddard & @NASAGoddardPix

Happy Earth Day from @NASAGoddard!

Spring arrived in the United States on March 20, but that did not stop a winter storm from dropping snow across the Upper Midwest a month later. On April 19, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this image of the snow dropped by the storm.

Credit: NASA images by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response #nasagoddard #earth #snow #spring

The Tasmania Fire Service webpage shows that all fires captured in this Aqua image from April 20, 2018 are, in fact, fires deliberately set for land management. This is a very important part of making sure that vast swaths of land don't burn during a lightning strike. In order to guard against this, firefighters take out areas of scrub, dead grasses, underbrush, and other flammable detritus so that if the area is hit by lightning or someone carelessly starts a fire, that fire does not get out of control quickly using that detritus as kindling for exacerbating the fire. .
In fact prescribed fires are actually used for more than just fire management. These fires help in these ways:
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After many years of fire exclusion, an ecosystem that needs periodic fire becomes unhealthy. Trees are stressed by overcrowding; fire-dependent species disappear; and flammable fuels build up and become hazardous. The right fire at the right place at the right time:
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Reduces hazardous fuels, protecting human communities from extreme fires; minimizes the spread of pest insects and disease; removes unwanted species that threaten species native to an ecosystem; provides forage for game; improves habitat for threatened and endangered species; recycles nutrients back to the soil; and promotes the growth of trees, wildflowers, and other plants;
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This image was captured by NASA's Aqua satellite using the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument onboard on April 20, 2018. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS’s thermal bands, are outlined in red. .
NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, GSFC #nasagoddard #fire #Tasmania #earth

This colorful image, taken by @nasahubble, celebrates the Earth-orbiting observatory’s 28th anniversary of viewing the heavens, giving us a window seat to the universe’s extraordinary tapestry of stellar birth and destruction.
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At the center of the photo, a monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust.
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This mayhem is all happening at the heart of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery located 4,000 light-years away and visible in binoculars simply as a smudge of light with a bright core.
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The giant star, called Herschel 36, is bursting out of its natal cocoon of material, unleashing blistering radiation and torrential stellar winds (streams of subatomic particles) that push dust away in curtain-like sheets. This action resembles the Sun bursting through the clouds at the end of an afternoon thunderstorm that showers sheets of rainfall.
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Credit: NASA, ESA, and STScI
#nasagoddard #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #star #nebula

A monster young star 200,000 times brighter than our Sun is blasting powerful ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds, carving out a fantasy landscape of ridges, cavities, and mountains of gas and dust.
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This video zooms into the core of a rich star-birth region called the Lagoon Nebula, located in the constellation Sagittarius in the direction of our Milky Way galaxy’s central bulge.
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Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon, D. Player, J. DePasquale, F. Summers, and Z. Levay (STScI)
Acknowledgement: A. Fujii, Digitized Sky Survey, ESO/VPHAS, and R. Crisp
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#NASAGoddard #space #science #star #nebula #Sagittarius

The Moon's Aristarchus Plateau

The Aristarchus plateau is an area of the Moon ripe for future exploration due to the diversity of its impact and volcanic materials. It features a prominent crater so bright it’s not only visible through telescopes, but also to the naked eye. This region can tell us a lot about the rich volcanic history of the Moon. The river-like structure is actually a channel made from a long-ago lava flow.
More info: Take a virtual tour of the Moon in all-new 4K resolution, thanks to data provided by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. As the visualization moves around the near side, far side, north and south poles, we highlight interesting features, sites, and information gathered on the lunar terrain. Watch the full video at: http://bit.ly/TourTheMoon

Credit: NASA/Goddard/LRO #nasagoddard #moon #space #science #TourTheMoon

The Moon’s Tycho Crater

For scientists, parts of the Moon’s Tycho crater remain a mystery. It’s around 100 million years old, which is young in geologic time. Here, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera captured the central peak with a 120 meter-wide boulder at the summit – the origins of which are unknown.
More info: Take a virtual tour of the Moon in all-new 4K resolution, thanks to data provided by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. As the visualization moves around the near side, far side, north and south poles, we highlight interesting features, sites, and information gathered on the lunar terrain. Watch the full video at: http://bit.ly/TourTheMoon

Credit: NASA/Goddard/LRO #nasagoddard #moon #space #science #TourTheMoon

Who wins the celestial showdown of galaxy clusters vs. superclusters? .
This @NASAHubble image shows a massive galaxy cluster glowing brightly in the darkness. Despite its beauty, this cluster bears the distinctly unpoetic name of PLCK G308.3-20.2.
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Galaxy clusters can contain thousands of galaxies all held together by the glue of gravity. At one point in time they were believed to be the largest structures in the universe — until they were usurped in the 1980s by the discovery of superclusters. These massive formations typically contain dozens of galaxy clusters and groups and span hundreds of millions of light-years. However, clusters do have one thing to cling on to: superclusters are not held together by gravity, so galaxy clusters still retain the title of the biggest structures in the universe bound by gravity.
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One of the most interesting features of galaxy clusters is the stuff that permeates the space between the constituent galaxies: the intracluster medium (ICM). High temperatures are created in these spaces by smaller structures forming within the cluster. This results in the ICM being made up of plasma — ordinary matter in a superheated state. Most luminous matter in the cluster resides in the ICM, which is very luminous in X-rays. However, the majority of the mass in a galaxy cluster exists in the form of non-luminous dark matter. Unlike plasma, dark matter is not made from ordinary matter such as protons, neutrons and electrons. It is a hypothesized substance thought to make up 80% of the universe’s mass, yet it has never been directly observed.
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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS #nasagoddard #space #galaxy #stars #science #galaxy #superclusters

Send your name to the Sun! 🛰☀️ go.nasa.gov/HotTicket
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@NASA's Parker Solar Probe will revolutionize our understanding of the Sun; it will swoop to within 4 million miles of the Sun's surface, facing heat and radiation like no spacecraft before it. Launching in 2018, Parker Solar Probe will provide new data on solar activity and make critical contributions to our ability to forecast major space weather events that impact life on Earth.
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Be a part of the first mission to touch the Sun! Submit your name to be included on a memory card that will fly aboard the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft at go.nasa.gov/HotTicket. Deadline April 27, 2018.
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Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein
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#nasa #sun #beautiful #space #science #astronomy #nasagoddard

Do you think you have what it takes to be NASA's next great photographer? Then we've got the perfect paid photography internship for you. .
This internship is located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and is open to current students and individuals accepted for enrollment in qualifying educational programs. Preferred majors: photography, photojournalism, mass communication/media. Applications will be accepted through April 9.
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This position in NASA's Pathways Intern Program provides students with the opportunity to explore NASA careers and gain meaningful developmental work experience.
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To apply, visit: https://bit.ly/2JfiFnj or go to usajobs.gov and search for announcement GS18I0019.
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Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #intern #photography #space #internship #nasa #photographer

@NASAHubble shows the spiral galaxy NGC 5714 about 130 million light-years away in the constellation of Boötes (the Herdsman). Its spiral arms are hard to see as NGC 5714 presents itself at an almost perfectly edge-on angle.
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Discovered by William Herschel in 1787, NGC 5714 was host to a fascinating and rare event in 2003. A faint supernova appeared about 8,000 light-years below the central bulge of NGC 5714. Supernovae are the huge, violent explosions of dying stars. It was particularly interesting because its spectrum showed strong signatures of calcium.
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Calcium-rich supernovae are rare and hence of great interest to astronomers. Astronomers still struggle to explain these particular explosions as their existence presents a challenge to both observation and theory. In particular, their appearance outside of galaxies, their lower luminosity compared to other supernovae, and their rapid evolution are still open questions for researchers.

Credit: Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #HubbleFriday #galaxy #spiral #supernova

First-Ever 3-D Model of a Melting Snowflake
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Move over Elsa. For the first time ever NASA scientists have created a 3-D model of a melting snowflake. How might this research improve predictions of hazardous heavy and wet snow?
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NASA has produced the first three-dimensional numerical model of melting snowflakes in the atmosphere. Developed by scientist Jussi Leinonen of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the model provides a better understanding of how snow melts can help scientists recognize the signature in radar signals of heavier, wetter snow -- the kind that breaks power lines and tree limbs -- and could be a step toward improving predictions of this hazard.
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Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/ LK Ward #nasagoddard #elsa #frozen #ice #snow

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