lynseyaddario lynseyaddario

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Lynsey Addario  Pulitzer prize-winning photojournalist and author of ‘It’s What I Do’. My new book ‘Of Love & War’ with @penguinpress is available on Amazon.

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, migrants arriving in the port city of Augusta, Italy. September 2014. Between January and September 2014, roughly 120,000 refugees landed in Italy, more than double the total for the entire year of 2013. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, Children play on fallen trees during a drought in Turkana, Kenya. August 2011. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Pictured above, Iraqis suspected of being part of the insurgency are rounded up and detained by soldiers with the Fourth Infantry Division in Balad, Iraq, June 2003. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress.

I am honored to exhibit “Of Love and War” at @photoville LA this year, happening on two consecutive weekends on April 26-28 and May 2-5, 2019. I will be exhibiting images from my new book of photography, Of Love and war, a visual and written retrospective of my journey through war and humanitarian crises over the two decades: from Afghanistan under the Taliban shortly before 9/11 to the fall of Saddam Hussein and its aftermath, to the genocide in Darfur, the popular uprising and civil war in Libya, to the current Syrian refugee crises, which has displaced roughly half of the population of Syria. I’ve included short pieces by the journalists I have collaborated with over the years for The New York Times and Time Magazine, as well as letters to my mother from Baghdad, and an interview with a soldier I was embedded with in the Korengal valley. I hope this exhibition gives insight into the complexity of war. Thank you to @hahnemuehle_global and @epilogueinc @penguinpress

Such a great honor to speak about the importance of frontline journalism at @womenintheworld yesterday, with the great Nima Elbaghir from @cnn and Alexandra Ulmer from @reuters and the one and only @johnavlon. #WITW

My love, Lukas. Another sunset. Sorry. #fromwartosunsets

That amazing moment when I see my book, “It’s What I Do” in the hotel library in Mexico. #ItsWhatIDo @penguinpress #enelinstantepreciso

We made it. Thank you, @pauldebendern. This is heaven.

Women and children who have just surrendered to Syrian Defense Forces in the human corridor outside of Baghouz wait to be transported to al-Hol camp in Hasaka province. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. March 2019, shot on assignment for @natgeo.

A wounded man surrenders in the human corridor on the outskirts of Baghouz in the final days of the battle to oust the Islamic State from its last remaining stronghold of Baghuz, in Syria, March 9, 2019. The U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory in late March over the last remaining sliver of land controlled by the brutal Islamic state in the town of Baghuz, as tens of thousands of the fighters’ family members have surrendered through a human corridor set up by the SDF during the past six weeks under heavy bombardment and intense clashes. Women and children, most of whom continued to pledge their unwavering support of ISIS, and some who were likely being used as human shields, had been living in tunnels and caves with limited food, medicine, and sanitation. On assignment for @natgeo

Women and children, who by and large expressed unwavering support for the Islamic State, wait to be registered at al-Hol refugee camp after surrendering during the Islamic State's final days in Baghouz, Deir Ezzour province. Several thousand women and children arrived at the registration area of the camp in March 2019. On assignment for @natgeo in early March. Read the story at the link in bio.

#TURNUPTHEVOLUME! Driving away from the frontline with Zana, listening to Nina Simone’s Freedom, in the final weeks of ISIS’ last sliver of territory of Baghouz. From Iraq to Afghanistan to Darfur to Libya to Syria, Zana hands down had the best music I’ve ever heard near a frontline. #thelittlethingsinwar

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