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Lion's Roar  The Lion’s Roar Foundation is a mission-driven, reader-supported publisher of Buddhist teachings, news, and perspectives.

https://www.lionsroar.com/on-death-row-creating-art-from-pain/

Sixteen years ago, at the age of 18, Moyo was convicted of murder and sentenced to death. From his cell in solitary confinement, he began to study the image of the Buddha. With the help of his pen pal, Maria, who lives over 5,000 miles away, his series of Buddha portraits have now become the art exhibition, “Buddhas On Death Row.”
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“I don’t expect to ever be let out of solitary confinement alive,” writes Moyo. “I am a healthy male. When I am executed, I won’t be able to donate any of my organs because at that point they will be ruined by the chemicals that the state goes to all sorts of lengths to acquire to kill me and others. So my protests are my donated organs. My speaking out are my donated organs. My art is my donated organs.”
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Read the full story of “Buddhas On Death Row,” on Lion’s Roar. Link in bio.
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Artwork by Moyo. Photos courtesy Maria Jain.

What makes us happy?
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Economics professor Clair Brown says this question underscores the key difference between free-market economics 💸 and Buddhist economics 📿. The former argues that humans are fundamentally selfish. The latter suggests that “human nature is generous and altruistic, even as it also cares about itself.”
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Read about how Buddhist economics could radically change society, on LionsRoar.com (link in bio).

“Buddhism teaches that we have ‘no fixed self.' There is nothing permanent about us. During the depression, I wasn’t my ‘self,’ as we say. I didn’t seem to have a self at all, in a way that cruelly mimicked this central point in Buddhist teaching,” writes Susan Moon in a moving account of her journey back from depression.
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“You’d think that it would be painless to have no self, because without a self, who was there to be in pain? And yet there was unbearable pain. Like a wind-up doll, I went stiffly through the motions of being Sue Moon, but there was no person present, no aliveness—only a battery that was running down.”
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“I felt angry at Buddhism, as if to say: ‘You told me there’s no fixed self, and I believed you, and look where it got me!’ I knew the yang of it but not the yin—the balancing truth that there was no separation.”
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Read “I Want to Tell You About Coming Apart and Struggling Through Depression" on LionsRoar.com. Link in bio.

Buddhist teachings contain a wealth of tools for fostering diversity. In a new spotlight on Lion’s Roar, we’ve collected powerful advice, wisdom, and anecdotes from pioneers of inclusivity. Click on the link in our bio to find out more.
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Pictured here: Member of @ebmc_oakland — a pioneer of Buddhist diversity initiatives — march in the 2015 “Reclaiming Dr. King’s Legacy” demonstration. 📷 by @outtatheshadows.

“Sometimes as an actor you’re looking for the infinite. If you can hold that, if you can remember that in the chaos, it will anchor you and give you grace and ease.”
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On Lion’s Roar, Benedict Cumberbatch talks about the leading role Buddhism has played in his life and career (link in bio).

Tomorrow is the final day of the Spring Sale in the Lion's Roar online store! One of the items featured is this print of a seated Guanyin Bodhisattva statue, which was on our May 2006 cover. Link in bio.
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The Seated Guanyin Bodhisattva depicted in this print comes from the Liao Dynasty (907-1125) in China, and is currently in the South and Southeast Asian Collection of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. The original 95” by 65” wooden figure is possibly the best-preserved and most magnificent sculpture from this period of Chinese Buddhist art.

#Repost @acnjustice
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"Anytime we do the work of love, we do the work of ending domination." -#bellhooks w @sharonsalzberg thru @lionsroarbuddhism

“Buddha” is not a person’s name. It’s a title, meaning “one who is awake.” The Buddha was not a god (in fact, he disapproved of worship); he was an ordinary man named Siddhartha Gautama.
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Learn more about the Buddha and what he realized in our essential guide, “Who Was the Buddha” (link in bio). 📷 courtesy of The Met.

Happy International Women’s Day! Though women have always played an important role in the dharma, they haven’t always been given the recognition or rights they deserve. Today, we have many examples of women — historical and contemporary — who’ve paved their own way on the Buddhist path, achieved titles and honors previously reserved for men, and dedicated their lives to spreading the dharma.
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In honor of today, we invite you to explore a collection of our best teachings from, profiles on, and conversations with women in Buddhism. Link in bio.
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📸 of "Tara, the Buddhist Savior,” 12th–early 13th century Nepal. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Zen practitioner David Gabriel Fischer describes his photography as “a personal search for light.” Fischer maintains an online photo journal called “The Zen Diary,” in which he regularly posts meditative photos that encapsulate the life and mind of Zen. See more of Fischer’s photos and read his instructions for meditative photography on Lion’s Roar (link in bio).

”If we’ve practiced on the cushion, we’re more ready for life’s constant change,” writes Jeremy Mohler. Read his essay about how meditation helps us accept — and affect — change, on LionsRoar.com (link in bio).
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📷 by Thomas Hawk. Buddha 🖌 by Freepik.

A little Buddhist humor found in our office kitchen.

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