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LensCulture  Now Open: LensCulture Portrait Awards 2018! Selected photographers shown at Photo London in May and in Arles this July. Enter today! >>

http://lensculture.co/Portrait-Awards-2018

Budget Day, Leeds Civic Hall Council Chamber, West Yorkshire, February 23, 2011

In the wake of major funding cuts agreed by the coalition government, and in response to Eric Pickles’s Localism Act 2011, which devolved greater powers to local government, councils across England were forced to make drastic decisions over their annual budgets. The ruling Labour Council in Leeds met to consider its 2011–12 budget and manage a £90-million shortfall. It was interrupted when protesters stormed their way into the council chamber where they hung anti-cuts banners. Police were eventually called to clear the protesters from the building, although none were arrested. The council had to decamp to another chamber, whereupon it did get a series of its cuts approved: the loss of 1,500 council jobs, closure of several adult social care buildings, savings in back- office operations, and a 15% cut in grants to arts organizations.
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For over a decade, Simon Roberts (@simoncroberts) has photographed events and places across Britain that have drawn people together in public, reflecting on the nature of our shared histories and communal experiences. “Merrie Albion - Landscape Studies of a Small Island” brings together iconic images and many previously unpublished photographs, recording social practices and customs linked to the British landscape.
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All images are © Simon Roberts, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery (@flowersgallery), London and New York.

An exhibition of this work is on view at Flowers Gallery, London E2 from January 19 – 10 March 2018. A new book with the same title has been has been published by Dewi Lewis Publishing to accompany this exhibition.

Cotswold Olimpicks, Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire, May 30, 2008

Created by lawyer Robert Dover in the early 1600s, with the support of King James, the Cotswold Olimpicks claim to be at the origins of modern Olympic games. A temporary wooden structure called Dover Castle was erected in a natural amphitheatre on what is now known as Dover’s Hill, complete with small cannons that were fired to begin the events. Original events like sledgehammer throwing and wrestling have since given way to Shin-Kicking, piano smashing, and Static Jump competitions.

Here men compete in Championship of the Hill, where teams of six vie against each other in a series of increasingly wet games, carrying buckets of water between water barrels and teammates.
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For over a decade, Simon Roberts (@simoncroberts) has photographed events and places across Britain that have drawn people together in public, reflecting on the nature of our shared histories and communal experiences. “Merrie Albion - Landscape Studies of a Small Island” brings together iconic images and many previously unpublished photographs, recording social practices and customs linked to the British landscape.
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All images are © Simon Roberts, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery (@flowersgallery), London and New York.

An exhibition of this work is on view at Flowers Gallery, London E2 from January 19 – 10 March 2018. A new book with the same title has been has been published by Dewi Lewis Publishing to accompany this exhibition.

For over a decade, Simon Roberts (@simoncroberts) has photographed events and places across Britain that have drawn people together in public, reflecting on the nature of our shared histories and communal experiences. “Merrie Albion - Landscape Studies of a Small Island” brings together iconic images and many previously unpublished photographs, recording social practices and customs linked to the British landscape.
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This photo: London Olympics Opening Ceremony, Olympic Stadium, Stratford, London, July 27, 2012

The 2012 London Olympic Games was held on the fifth anniversary of the credit crunch, against the backdrop of continued economic uncertainties, Eurozone turmoil, and predictions of a long, slow financial recovery. The previous seven years of Olympic planning had also seen the end of the debt-fuelled boom, and London 2012 presented an opportunity for the British public to momentarily forget the economic cloud that pervaded.

At the heart of the opening ceremony were thousands of volunteers—men and women, mostly not actors and dancers—who turned up to hours of rehearsal in a car park in Dagenham for no pay. One of the most striking aspects of the 2012 Olympiad was the success of the volunteering program. In addition to the opening ceremony, nearly 70,000 people took part as “game makers,” a high proportion of whom had hailed from Newham, home of the Olympic Park, one of London’s poorest boroughs and also its most ethnically diverse.
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All images are © Simon Roberts, Courtesy of Flowers Gallery (@flowersgallery), London and New York.

An exhibition of this work is on view at Flowers Gallery, London E2 from January 19 – 10 March 2018. A new book with the same title has been has been published by Dewi Lewis Publishing to accompany this exhibition.

Now open—the LensCulture Portrait Awards! For the first time ever, we’re offering two exceptional exhibition opportunities: our winners, jurors’ picks, and finalists will show their work at Photo London in May and during the opening week in Arles this July. These are two of the world’s most important photo events—don’t miss this incredible opportunity to be seen alongside the biggest names in photography!

More info: www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018
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Photo by Ethan James Green, @ethanjamesgreen. From the series "Young New Yorkers." In the vein of portraits by Diane Arbus and Nan Goldin, these intimate photos capture the fresh, raw vibrancy of young people in New York who are living outside the ordinary.

Seeking the New Photographic Portrait! Our esteemed jurors are seeking compelling portraits from all over the world. Benefits include exhibitions at Photo London and Arles, projection of your work at international festivals, written feedback, worldwide media coverage, and exposure to our audience of 2.8 million. Participate in our global photography community—enter today!

More info: www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018
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Photo by Ken Hermann, @kenhermann. From the series "Flower Men," a visit to the renowned Malik Ghat Flower Market in Kolkata through a series of portraits that capture the proud vendors posing alongside their spectacular, delicate flora. Recently published as a book, as well. More info @kenhermann

Looking to exhibit your work? Want to receive written feedback on your photographs? The LensCulture Portrait Awards are dedicated to offering you the best opportunities for exposure, engagement, recognition, and critical feedback. London & Arles exhibitions plus much more. Don’t miss this opportunity—start your entry today!

More info: www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018
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Photo by Emily Sheffer, @emilysheffer. From the series "The Old World." Self-portraits that probe the duality within each individual—solitude and stillness against wild, unconscious dreams and uncontrollable anxieties. Discover what rules behind the thick curtain of mystery surrounding our own being.

Now open—the LensCulture Portrait Awards! For the first time ever, we’re offering two exceptional exhibition opportunities: our winners, jurors’ picks, and finalists will show their work at Photo London in May and during the opening week in Arles this July. These are two of the world’s most important photo events—don’t miss this incredible opportunity to be seen alongside the biggest names in photography!

More info: www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018
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Photo by Candace Karch, @sugarbeam. From the series "Ms. Ulmer," a touching portrait of a woman whose life-long companion has been art. Each day, for 90 years, she has drawn, illustrated, posed and created—doing her small part to bring a little more beauty into the world.

We’re thrilled to announce the LensCulture Portrait Awards! For the first time ever, we’re offering two exceptional exhibition opportunities: our winners, jurors’ picks, and finalists will show their work at Photo London in May and during the opening week in Arles this July. These are two of the world’s most important photo events—don’t miss this incredible opportunity to be seen alongside the biggest names in photography!

www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018

Our esteemed jurors are seeking compelling portraits from all over the world. Benefits include projection of your work at international festivals, written feedback, worldwide media coverage, and exposure to our audience of 2.8 million. Participate in our global photography community—enter today!

Deadline: February 27, 2018

Photo by Romina Ressia, @rominaressia
More at www.facebook.com/rominaressia1

Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past thirteen years exploring human relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015) and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy!
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Holbeach Bank. From the series “Farmed,” which explores a wide-open landscape in which monoculture is at the core. This environment is comprised primarily of straight lines with a flat horizon. Hart’s narrative pinpoints the objects that remain, when the surrounding have all been cleared by modern agricultural practice. He conveys nature’s vulnerability within this unsheltered and unprotected state.

For more, see @paulhartartist

Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past 13 years exploring human relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015) and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy!
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Hurn’s End. From the series “Drained,” which concentrates on an area of land lying barely above sea level. Located a few miles from the coastal area known as The Wash in the UK, the series is a personal interpretation of a region imbued with a very specific and unique character.

For more, see @paulhartartist

Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past 13 years exploring our relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015), and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy!
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Portal. Silver gelatin print, made by Hart. From the series “Truncated,” a tightly focused portrayal of an aging pine forest plantation in Derbyshire, England.

For more, see @paulhartartist

“Critical Archives III: Identities” is the main exhibition of MedPhoto Festival 2017-2018, which is taking place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rethymno, Crete from December 20th until March 20th, 2018. This year’s MedPhoto (@medphoto_festival) hosts a mosaic of photographic projects from or about Europe that depict the old and the new face of people in Europe and capture European societies in this procedure of transformation.

Today, we will be posting images from three of our favorite projects shown at the festival. Learn more via each photographer’s Instagram/website or through the festival. Enjoy!
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In 2010, as politicians discussed austerity measures with EU officials, TV were broadcasting scenes of rioting and unrest in the streets of Athens. Reacting to those images and playing the game of disinformation abuse, photographer Petros Efstathiadis sets up a parallel and ironic universe created out of that sudden "peur du Grec." He makes up an armour of artifacts and stand-in heroes. He styles models as rebels impersonated by the locals of his small village. They pose as anonymous partisans or prisoners, in garages, warehouses or living rooms. These are pictures of anonymous people, lost in the battle, rebels without a name or face, standing for potential heroes or unknown soldiers who didn’t choose their side, like a small troop in the middle of the battlefield, simply fighting to resist.

From the series "Lohos" by Petros Efsthadiades, courtesy CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery
www.petrosefstathiadis.com

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