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joelsartore joelsartore

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Joel Sartore- Photo Ark  Founder of the Photo Ark, a 25-year project to show the world the beauty of biodiversity in all its forms, and inspire action to save species.

http://pbs.com/rare

This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth!
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#pollinatorhero #cuteanimals #NOTAPET #honeybear #wildlifephotography #nature #animalfacts #kinkajou #adorable #natgeo #photoark #savetogether

This handsome bird photographed at @theomahazoo is a tufted puffin, a seabird native to the North Pacific Ocean. During breeding season, these birds’ bills turn from a dull red to a vibrant orange and they develop their distinctive golden feather tufts. Tufted puffins are excellent flyers, capable of reaching 40 mph (64 kph) and beating their wings 300-400 times per minute. They are also remarkable swimmers. To catch fish, tufted puffins dive as deep as 80 feet (24 meters) and use their hooked beaks to hold multiple fish at once.
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#tuftedpuffin #seabirds #birds #handsome #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

This red-bellied lemur named 'Iroquiois' at the @dukelemurcenter is a species endemic to eastern Madagascan rainforests. Research suggests that these lemurs form pair bonds and males have been known to hold their babies just as often as their female counterparts. They are social animals and usually remain in their family groups for their whole lives. Red-bellied lemurs are currently listed as vulnerable on the #IUCN Redlist due to major habitat loss caused by illegal logging in Madagascar and the slash and burn agriculture that follows.
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#lemurs #primates #redbelliedlemur #cuteanimal #NOTAPET #adorable #vulnerablespecies #rareanimals #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

Barn owls like this one photographed at @penangbirdpark are the most widespread of any owl species, thriving in six continents and on many islands. This bird’s ghostly appearance, eerie call, and habit of roosting in places like church belfries and abandoned buildings has provoked a lot of negative superstition. However, since barn owls prey mainly on rats and mice, their presence has actually proven to be quite beneficial for some. Barn owls have very soft feathers, which help them fly silently while on the hunt. Their ears are lopsided on the sides of their heads, one higher than the other, which helps them to triangulate the sound made by prey, and detect its exact location, even in total darkness.
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#owl #barnowls #birds #owls #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

California giant sea cucumbers, like this one photographed at @montereybayaquarium, can regenerate any part of their body if they are harmed. In fact, as a defense mechanism these invertebrates will violently discharge their inner organs along with a sticky substance to both entangle and confuse their attacker. The sea cucumber remains alive and their organs eventually regrow.
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#seacucmber #invertebrates #sealife #marinelife #underwater #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

This insect may look like forest debris from afar, but this Malaysian dead leaf mantis is very much alive. Photographed at @theomahazoo, this species is specialized to resemble a dried leaf so that hungry predators will ignore it as they search for a meal. When threatened, nymphs of this species will freeze and curl their legs in under their leaf-like backs in order to play dead. Adults, however, will raise their their wings and display the bright orange pattern underneath to fend off a predator.
To see a video of this mantis, check out @natgeo.
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#insects #bugs #mantis #deadleafmantis #mantid #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

Bald eagles aren’t born with that 'bald' look. When they’re young, these birds have a fully brown plumage and don’t develop the white feathers on their heads for another four or five years. During courtship, bald eagles display an incredible aerial dance wherein they grasp each other by the talons and spin in mid-air. After this strange display, those who mate will stay together for their entire lives, which can last up to 38 years! The two eagles will work together to build their record-breaking, 4.5 foot wide nests, and even take turns incubating their eggs.
Bald eagles are a true conservation success story. They were once abundant in the United States, but when European settlers arrived, their numbers dropped drastically. In 1940 Congress passed an act to protect them, and though the act was helpful in protecting eagles, their populations didn’t really start to grow again until the early 1970s when a deadly insecticide called DDT was finally banned. In 2007, bald eagles were removed from the endangered species list and there are now about 9,700 nesting pairs in the lower 48 states.
This bald eagle was photographed at the @suttoncenter. To see a video of a bald eagle, check out @natgeo.
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#baldeagle #eagles #birds #ealge #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

The queen of this #pollinatormonday is this no-spot ladybug from Salt Lake City, Utah. Did you know that there are more than 5,000 species of ladybug in the world? These industrious pollinators are highly desired by gardeners and farmers alike, as they feed on pests such as mites, mealybugs, and aphids. The name "ladybug" was coined by farmers in Europe during the Middle Ages who prayed to the Virgin Mary when pests began eating their crops. After ladybugs came and wiped out the invading insects, the farmers named them "beetle of Our Lady." This eventually was shortened to "lady beetle" and finally "ladybug”. Even today, many gardeners order ladybugs as a natural way to combat pests and improve crop yields. In addition to fighting pests, these beetles secondarily feed on both pollen and nectar, and thus pollinate many different kinds of flowering plants and legumes.
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#nature #wildlife #photoark #savetogether #ladybug #insects #pollinatorhero

Many animals who typically choose fight as opposed to flight against predators have markings that proudly display their most useful weapon of defense. This is why skunks have white stripes pointing directly toward their rear end. Though emitting a controlled stream of smelly, oily spray up to ten feet (3 meters) toward an opponent is a powerful defense mechanism, it’s not usually a skunk’s first means of deterrence. Since spraying will leave them helpless until they can “reload”, skunks will first try to scare their attacker off by locking eyes and standing on their front paws, pointing their tail directly at the predator. Most skunks are not aggressive and their spray causes no harm to humans other than a lingering smell that might last for a couple days.
The baby skunk pictured here was orphaned and rescued in Dunbar, Nebraska.
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#skunks #babyanimals #adorable #cute #skunk #cuteanimals #babyskunk #animalrehabilitation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

In south and southeast Asia, Malayan porcupines like this one photographed at Night Safari, part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (@wrs.ig), can be found foraging for roots, tubers, bark and fallen fruits at night. These rodents live in underground dens in forest habitats and are typically found alone or in pairs. Malayan porcupines have a back full of stiff, sharp quills, which are actually just modified hairs. As babies those quills are soft, but with age they harden and are used as defense against predators.
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#porcupine #malayan #malayanporcupine #rodents #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

This gould’s monitor lizard, photographed at @theomahazoo belongs to a species of reptile found throughout most of Australia. These lizards are ground-dwelling and make their homes in underground burrows. They are diligent foragers, consuming almost anything in their paths that is smaller than themselves including mice, birds, large insects and small lizards. They’ve even been known to kill and eat extremely venomous snakes with no health repercussions.
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#monitor #lizards #reptiles #herps #animalfacts #biodiversity #wildlife #nature #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

I am thrilled to announce that with this image of the Leadbeater’s possum at @ZoosVictoria, the Photo Ark has surpassed the 7,000 species milestone!
This adorable marsupial was missing in action for more than 50 years before being rediscovered in 1961. The tiny possums are speedy and feisty, and, with estimates as low as 50 for the Lowland population, their status has recently been upgraded to critically endangered. Zoos Victoria has led extensive research on the possum for a number years and has hopes to soon begin a breeding population.
The possums are nicknamed ‘forest fairies’, referencing the way these little critters navigate the forest understory at night and the fact that they nest in hollow-bearing trees. These unique animals are threatened due to the loss of these types of trees, the threat of wildlife and the loss of suitable habitat due to land clearing which has led to smaller and fragmented populations.
Join the conversation and follow the rest of the #PhotoArk journey by using the hashtag #SaveTogether.

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